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Symptoms » Eating symptoms » Glossary
 

Glossary for Eating symptoms

Medical terms related to Eating symptoms or mentioned in this section include:

  • 18-Hydroxylase deficiency: A rare genetic, metabolic defect where a deficiency of the enzyme 18-Hydroxylase which results in a reduced amount of aldosterone and salt wasting.
  • 2-Methylbutyric Aciduria: A very rare genetic disorder where an enzyme deficiency prevents the break down of certain proteins into energy and results in a harmful accumulation of acids in the blood and body tissues. More specifically, there is a deficiency of an enzyme (2-methylbutyryl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase) needed to convert the amino acid isoleucine into energy. 2-methylbutyrylglycine levels build up in the body and may cause damage. Symptoms vary according to the degree of enzyme deficiency - can range from asymptomatic to life-threatening.
  • 2-methylbutyryl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase deficiency: A very rare genetic disorder where an enzyme deficiency prevents the break down of certain proteins into energy and results in a harmful accumulation of acids in the blood and body tissues. More specifically, there is a deficiency of an enzyme (2-methylbutyryl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase) needed to convert the amino acid isoleucine into energy. 2-methylbutyrylglycine levels build up in the body and may cause damage. Symptoms vary according to the degree of enzyme deficiency - can range from asymptomatic to life-threatening.
  • 22q11.2 deletion syndrome: A rare genetic disorder caused by the absence of a small portion of genetic material. A small section of chromosome 22 is missing at a location called q11.2. Chromosome 22 is one of 23 pairs of chromosomes that exist in humans.
  • 2p21 deletion syndrome: This syndrome is a more severe form hypotonia-cystinuria syndrome as a larger portion of genetic material from chromosome 2p21 is deleted. It is characterized by infant seizures, reduced muscle tone, developmental delay, lactic acidosis and unusual facial appearance.
  • 3 alpha methylcrotonyl-Coa carboxylase 1 deficiency: A rare inherited disorder where lack of a certain enzyme (3-methylcrotonyl-Coa carboxylase) stops proteins with the amino acid leucine being metabolized normally by the body. The leucine builds up in the body and causes damage to the brain and nervous system. The severity of the condition is variable with some cases being mild enough to be asymptomatic. The condition differs from type 2 in that it originates as a defect in a different gene (MCC1 gene) but it causes the same enzyme deficiency.
  • 3 alpha methylcrotonyl-coa carboxylase 2 deficiency: A rare inherited disorder where lack of a certain enzyme (3-methylcrotonyl-Coa carboxylase) stops proteins with the amino acid leucine being metabolized normally by the body. The leucine builds up in the body and causes damage to the brain and nervous system. The severity of the condition is variable with some cases being mild enough to be asymptomatic. The condition differs from type 1 in that it originates as a defect in a different gene (MCC2 gene) but it causes the same enzyme deficiency.
  • 3-alpha-Hydroxyacyl-CoA Dehydrogenase Deficiency: A rare inherited form of biochemical disorder characterized by the deficiency of a particular enzyme (3-Hydroxyacyl-CoA Dehydrogenase). The enzyme deficiency only affects certain body tissues, in particular the skeletal muscles. The lack of enzyme activity prevents some fats being converted into energy. Symptoms tend to be exacerbated during fasting as during fasting, the body tries to rely more heavily on fats for energy. Fatty acids that are not completely metabolized due to the enzyme deficiency may build up in various organs and cause serious complications.
  • 3-alpha-hydroxyacyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase deficiency: A rare inherited form of biochemical disorder characterized by the deficiency of a particular enzyme (3-Hydroxyacyl-CoA Dehydrogenase). The enzyme deficiency only affects certain body tissues, in particular the skeletal muscles. The lack of enzyme activity prevents some fats being converted into energy. Symptoms tend to be exacerbated during fasting as during fasting, the body tries to rely more heavily on fats for energy. Fatty acids that are not completely metabolized due to the enzyme deficiency may build up in various organs and cause serious complications.
  • 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase deficiency: A rare inherited disorder where lack of a certain enzyme (3-methylcrotonyl-Coa carboxylase) stops proteins with the amino acid leucine being metabolized normally by the body. The leucine builds up in the body and causes damage to the brain and nervous system. The severity of the condition is variable with some cases being mild enough to be asymptomatic.
  • ACAD8 deficiency: An extremely rare metabolic disorder where the body is unable to metabolize certain proteins properly. More specifically, an insufficient level of the enzyme (isobutyryl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase) needed to metabolize the amino acid valine. The onset and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • ACTH Deficiency: A rare endocrine disorder involving a lack of ACTH (adrenocorticotropic hormone) and low levels of cortisol and steroid hormones.
  • ACTH resistance: A rare inherited genetic disorder characterized by adrenal insufficiency due to the adrenal gland's inability to respond to ACTH and hence produce the hormone called cortisol.
  • APECED Syndrome: APECED is a recessively inherited genetic disease characterized by the presence of two of the following three conditions: impaired parathyroid function, yeast infection (candidiasis) and impaired adrenal gland function (Addison's disease). It is an autoimmune disease resulting from a genetic defect. The body's immune system malfunctions and attacks it's own body tissues.
  • Abdominal Cancer: Growth of abnormal cells (tumour) affecting the organs in the abdominal cavity; may be due to primary growth of a tumour or spread from another tumour (metastases, secondary tumour)
  • Abdominal Neoplasms: A tumor that occurs in the abdomen.
  • Abdominal swelling: Swelling or bloating of the abdomen
  • Aberrant subclavian artery abnormality: A rare defect where one the subclavian artery arises from an abnormal location on the aortic arch. The defect may cause compression of organs such as the airway and the voice box.
  • Abnormalities, Radiation-Induced: Conditions arising from the use of radiation therapy to treat various cancers. Radiation therapy can result in minor abnormalities such as dry, flaky skin or serious abnormalities such as cancer.
  • Absent patellae -- scrotal hypoplasia -- renal anomalies -- facial dysmorphism -- mental retardation: A rare syndrome characterized by absent kneecaps, underdeveloped scrotum, kidney anomalies, unusual facial appearance and mental retardation.
  • Abuse dwarfism syndrome: Retarded growth, intelligence and social behavior due to child abuse. The child abuse can take the form of mental or physical cruelty or neglect.
  • Acanthocytosis: A rare disorder where most of the red blood cells are abnormal with spiny projections due to lipid abnormalities. The blood abnormality is seen in conditions such as abetalipoproteinemia, severe liver disease and severe malnutrition. Symptoms and prognosis depend on the underlying disorder.
  • Accelerated silicosis: An occupation lung disease caused by breathing in silica dust over a long period of time. The lung damage becomes symptomatic and affects breathing and often causes weight loss as well.
  • Accessory navicular bone: An abnormal bone that develops in the arch in the middle of the foot. Often there are no symptoms but if the bone is large it may rub against shoes and cause problems.
  • Acetaminophen poisoning: Excessive ingestion of a drug called acetaminophen.
  • Achalasia: A rare condition where the patients muscles, such as the cardiac sphincter of the stomach, are unable to relax.
  • Achalasia -- adrenal -- alacrima syndrome: A familial disorder characterized by adrenal gland-related hormonal problems, swallowing difficulty (achalasia) and a lack of tears (alacrima). Neurological impairment and motor and sensory neuropathy is progressive. The adrenal glands in patients are resistant to the ACTH hormone and hence fails to operate normally.
  • Achalasia -- alacrimia syndrome: A rare disorder characterized by the association of achalasia (lack of peristaltic motion) and alacrimia (absent tears).
  • Achalasia, familial esophageal: A rare familial disorder where the esophagus lacks the normal peristaltic motions that help food move through the digestive system.
  • Achalasia, primary: A rare motor disorder of the esophagus characterized by inability of the lower esophageal sphincter and esophageal muscle to relax as well as dilation of the esophagus. The disorder is not associated with any other disease or disorder.
  • Achrestic anemia: Achrestic anemia is a form of anemia similar to that caused by Vitamin B12 deficiency but it doesn't respond to treatment with Vitamin B12. The condition tends to progress slowly and can result in death if not treated. There are a variety of possible causes.
  • Achromatopsia: Patients who have achromatopsia (sometimes called achromatopia) do not have normal "cone vision.". Although the term may refer to acquired disorders such as color agnosia and cerebral achromatopsia, it typically refers to an autosomal recessive congenital color vision disorder, the inability to perceive color AND to achieve satisfactory visual acuity at high light levels (typically exterior daylight).
  • Acid reflux / heartburn:
  • Acid regurgitation: The regurgitation of stomach contents
  • Acinic cell carcinoma: A usually slow-growing malignant tumor that that can occur in various parts of the body but is most often found in the pancreas, salivary glands, palate and upper lip. Symptoms are determined by the size and location of the growth.
  • Acquired agranulocytosis: A blood disorder characterized by low levels of white blood cells (granular leukocytes) in the circulating blood. The condition is usually caused by certain drugs especially chemotherapy drugs.
  • Acquired angioedema: A rare disorder characterized by recurring episodes of swelling of parts of the skin or mucous membranes. Sometimes internal organs may be involved. The disorder occurs in patients with lymphoproliferative or autoimmune disorders which result in the dysfunction of a complex blood protein called C1 inhibitor.
  • Acquired idiopathic sideroblastic anaemia: A rare disorder where iron is transported into a developing blood cells but because it is unable to be used, it builds up within the cell and tends to stop it from developing into a fully functioning red blood cell. Thus anemia can occur despite adequate or even high iron levels. Acquired cases can occur on exposure to excess alcohol, lead and drugs or can occur to nutritional problems involving a deficiency of folic acid or copper or an excess of zinc. The condition can also be caused by conditions such as kidney problems, endocrine dysfunction, metabolic disorders, rheumatoid arthritis and leukemia.
  • Acrodynia: A disease occurring in infants or young children. Symptoms include edema, pruritis, skin rash, extremities are pink, cheeks and nose are scarlet, profuse sweating, digestive disturbance, photophobia, polyneuritis, irritability, listlessness, apathy and failure to thrive.
  • Acrofacial dysostosis Catania form: One of a group of disorders characterized by defective limb and facial development. The Catania form is very rare.
  • Acrofacial dysostosis, Nager type: A rare genetic disorder characterized by underdeveloped thumbs, forearm and cheekbones as well as ear defects.
  • Actinomycetales infection: A bacterial infection from the order of Actinobacteria. The range of symptoms is variable depending on which bacteria from the order is involved.
  • Acute Pesticide poisoning -- xylene: Xylene is an ingredient used in certain insecticides. Exposure to the chemical can cause a range of symptoms depending on the level and route of exposure. Exposure can occur through inhalation, ingestion, the skin or eyes. Acute exposure involves a exposure over a short period of time whereas chronic exposure occurs over a longer period of time.
  • Acute Silicosis: An occupation lung disease caused by breathing in high levels of silica dust.
  • Acute adult T-Cell leukemia: A form of blood cancer affecting the T-cells which make up the body's immune system. The disease is caused by the HTLV-1 virus (human T-cell leukemia virus) which causes the proliferation of abnormal T-cells. The virus can be transmitted sexually and may lay dormant for decades. There are four subtypes: acute, chronic, lymphoma and smoldering. The acute and lymphoma subtypes have the poorest prognosis. The acute subtype tends to progress rapidly and is the most prevalent form of the condition.
  • Acute appendicitis: Infection of the appendix
  • Acute biphenotypic leukemia: A rare form of leukemia that has myeloid and lymphoid features.
  • Acute fatty liver of pregnancy: A rare complication of pregnancy that can occur in the second half of the pregnancy. It is characterized by excessive fatty deposits in the liver which can be fatal without prompt diagnosis and treatment which involves delivering the baby as soon as possible.
  • Acute heartburn after eating: food can be the precipitating factor to cause heartburn
  • Acute lymphoblastic leukemia: A malignant disease that starts suddenly and progresses quickly. It is characterized by a high number of immature cells in the organs, bone marrow and blood. Symptoms include fever, pallor, anorexia, fatigue, anemia, hemorrhage, bone pain, splenomegaly and frequent infections. Also called acute lymphocytic leukemia.
  • Acute lymphoblastic leukemia, Susceptibility to: Cancer of the white blood cells characterized by the presence of excessive lymphoblasts. Precursors to white blood cells are called blasts and are made by the bone marrow but in ALL the blasts are abnormal and do not develop into lymphocytes. Instead, the abnormal blasts or leukemic cells multiply rapidly and reduce the level of other types of blood cells such as red blood cells and platelets. There are two subtypes of leukemia linked to a genetic anomaly which increases a person's susceptibility to developing the cancer. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome 10q21 and type 2 is linked to a defect on chromosome 7p12.2.
  • Acute lymphoblastic leukemia, Susceptibility to, 1: Cancer of the white blood cells characterized by the presence of excessive lymphoblasts. Precursors to white blood cells are called blasts and are made by the bone marrow but in ALL the blasts are abnormal and do not develop into lymphocytes. Instead, the abnormal blasts or leukemic cells multiply rapidly and reduce the level of other types of blood cells such as red blood cells and platelets. There are two subtypes of leukemia linked to a genetic anomaly which increases a person's susceptibility to developing the cancer. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome 10q21.
  • Acute lymphoblastic leukemia, Susceptibility to, 2: Cancer of the white blood cells characterized by the presence of excessive lymphoblasts. Precursors to white blood cells are called blasts and are made by the bone marrow but in ALL the blasts are abnormal and do not develop into lymphocytes. Instead, the abnormal blasts or leukemic cells multiply rapidly and reduce the level of other types of blood cells such as red blood cells and platelets. There are two subtypes of leukemia linked to a genetic anomaly which increases a person's susceptibility to developing the cancer. Type 2 is linked to a defect on chromosome 7p12.2.
  • Acute lymphoblastic leukemia, adult: Cancer of the white blood cells. Precursors to white blood cells are called blasts and are made by the bone marrow but in ALL the blasts are abnormal and do not develop into lymphocytes. Instead, the abnormal blasts or leukemic cells multiply rapidly and reduce the level of other types of blood cells such as red blood cells and platelets.
  • Acute meningitis: Acute meningitis is an inflammation of the brain that presents in an acute fashion. The inflammation may be the result of infective agents such as bacteria, viruses and fungi as well as non-infective agents such as certain drugs. Acute forms of meningitis can develop in within hours or days whereas chronic meningitis develops over weeks or months.
  • Acute mountain sickness: A condition that occurs when an un-acclimatized person climbs to high altitudes.
  • Acute myelofibrosis: A rare condition where progressive scarring or fibrosis of the bone marrow impairs it's ability to make blood cells causing symptoms such as anemia and liver and spleen enlargement.
  • Acute myelosclerosis: A rare disorder where the bone marrow makes too many blood cells. The disease progresses rapidly with death usually occurring within 6 months of onset.
  • Acute panmyelosis: A rare condition where progressive scarring or fibrosis of the bone marrow impairs it's ability to make blood cells causing symptoms such as anemia and liver and spleen enlargement. The disease often progresses rapidly and results in death.
  • Acute pharyngitis: A condition which is characterized by an acute inflammatory reaction of the pharynx
  • Acute promyelocytic leukemia: A rare bone marrow cancer characterized by a lack of mature blood cells and excessive amounts of immature blood cells (promyelocytes).
  • Acute reflux-like regurgitation: acid reflux related disorders
  • Acute reflux-like regurgitation in pregnancy: Acute reflux-like regurgitation in pregnancy is the movement of the acid contents of the stomach through the gastro-oesophageal sphincter up into the oesophagus, causing a burning, pain or discomfort in the chest, commonly known as heartburn. The contents sometimes reach the mouth and may be swallowed or expelled.
  • Acute rheumatic fever: Bacterial joint infection with risk of heart complications.
  • Acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, short chain, deficiency of: A rare disorder where the body lacks enzymes needed to convert some fats (short-chain fatty acids) into energy. Symptoms are exacerbated by fasting or acute illness. The severity of symptoms is variable with some patients remaining virtually asymptomatic their whole life while other suffer symptoms from infancy.
  • Addiction symptoms: Symptoms related to addiction (physical or mental addiction)
  • Adducted thumb syndrome recessive form: A rare recessively inherited disorder characterized mainly by a small head, arthrogryposis (joint contractures), cleft palate and various other abnormalities.
  • Adducted thumbs -- arthrogryposis, Christian type: A rare recessively inherited disorder characterized mainly by a small head, arthrogryposis (joint contractures), cleft palate and various other abnormalities.
  • Adenitis: Involves the inflammation of a lymph node and usually occurs in conjunction with an oral pharyngeal or ear infection.
  • Adenocarcinoma of lung: A tumor that develops in the lining of the lung. The tumor is usually slow growing.
  • Adenocarcinoma, Bronchiolo-Alveolar: A form of lung cancer that develops in the bronchioles or alveoli.
  • Adenocarcinoma, Follicular: A type of cancer of the thyroid gland.
  • Adenoid cystic carcinoma: A malignant cancer in the form of cysts which may occur in the salivary glands, breast, mucous glands of the respiratory tract and sometimes in vulval vestibular glands. Also called adeoncystic carcinoma, adenomyoepithelioma, cribriform carcinoma or cylindroma.
  • Adenophorea Infections: A parasitic roundworm infection. Roundworms can be found in water and soil environments as well as on plants and in animals.
  • Adenovirus-related Cold: An Adenovirus-related cold is a relatively minor contagious infection of the nose and throat caused by the Adenovirus. Although colds can cause discomfort they are not considered a serious condition.
  • Adhesions: A fibrous band or structure by which parts abnormally adhere
  • Adhesive abuse: Adhesive abuse is the use of various inhalants for the purpose of achieving a "high". They are often used as a cheap, readily available alternative to street drugs but they can cause serious damage to the body. Adhesives include household glues, rubber cement and model aeroplane glue. These adhesives can be abused by sniffing them, spraying directly into the mouth, heating them and then inhaling them or injecting them directly into the body.
  • Adhesive addiction: Adhesive addiction refers to the compulsive need to abuse adhesives (e.g. sniffing them). Sufferers have withdrawal symptoms when attempting to stop the habit and feel unable to stop the habit despite knowing the harm it is causing their health. Aerosols are very damaging to the body and can readily result permanent brain damage and even death. Death can occur through chronic use and in rare cases can occur after one session of use. Children and teenagers are particular at risk for this type of addiction - it is readily available and users feel it gains them greater acceptance from their peers. Adhesives includes household glue, rubber cement and model airplane glue.
  • Adrenal Cortex Diseases: Diseases of the adrenal cortex. Examples includes Addison's disease, Cushing's syndrome and adrenal fatigue.
  • Adrenal crisis: A potentially fatal condition where the adrenal cortex slows or stops functioning resulting in reduced glucocorticoids, decreased extracellular fluid volume and hyperkalemia. Symptoms include shock, coma, low blood pressure, weakness and loss of vasomotor tone. Also called addisonian crisis.
  • Adrenal disorders: Disorders affecting the adrenal glands
  • Adrenal gland symptoms: Symptoms affecting the adrenal glands
  • Adrenal hyperplasia: A group of disorder that occur when there is a problem in the process of making adrenal corticosteroids.
  • Adrenal hypoplasia congenital, X-linked: A genetic disorder which affects the body tissues that produce hormones. It is characterized by underdeveloped adrenal glands which results adrenal insufficiency and hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism.
  • Adrenoleukodystrophy: A rare hereditary metabolic disease that only occurs in male children and is characterized by adrenal atrophy and extensive cerebral demyelination causing progressive loss of mental functioning, aphasia, apraxia and sometimes blindness. The patient usually dies within 5 years.
  • Adult SMA: Form of Spinal Muscular Atrophy in adults.
  • Adult T-Cell leukemia: A form of blood cancer affecting the T-cells which make up the body's immune system. The disease is caused by the HTLV-1 virus (human T-cell leukemia virus) which causes the proliferation of abnormal T-cells. The virus can be transmitted sexually and may lay dormant for decades. There are four subtypes: acute, chronic, lymphoma and smoldering. The acute and lymphoma subtypes have the poorest prognosis.
  • Adult T-Cell lymphoma: A form of blood cancer affecting the T-cells which make up the body's immune system. The disease is caused by the HTLV-1 virus (human T-cell leukemia virus) which causes the proliferation of abnormal T-cells. The virus can be transmitted sexually and may lay dormant for decades. There are four subtypes: acute, chronic, lymphoma and smoldering. The acute and lymphoma subtypes have the poorest prognosis. The lymphoma subtype is aggressive and tends to affect the lymph nodes more than the blood.
  • Adverse reaction: Term to describe unwanted, negative consequences sometimes associated with using medications, diagnostic tests or therapeutic interventions.
  • Aerosol abuse: Aerosol abuse is the use of various inhalants for the purpose of achieving a "high". They are often used as a cheap, readily available alternative to street drugs but they can cause serious damage to the body. Aerosols include air fresheners, hair spray, spray pain and deodorants. These aerosols can be abused by sniffing them, spraying directly into the mouth, heating them and then inhaling them or injecting them directly into the body.
  • Aerosol addiction: Aerosol addiction refers to the compulsive need to abuse aerosol (e.g. sniffing them). Sufferers have withdrawal symptoms when attempting to stop the habit and feel unable to stop the habit despite knowing the harm it is causing their health. Aerosols are very damaging to the body and can readily result permanent brain damage and even death. Death can occur through chronic use and in rare cases can occur after one session of use. Children and teenagers are particular at risk for this type of addiction - it is readily available and users feel it gains them greater acceptance from their peers. Aerosols includes spray pain, air freshener, deodorants and hair sprays.
  • Agenesis of the corpus callosum: Congenital absence of connective part of the brain.
  • Aglossia: A congenital condition where the tongue is absent.
  • Agyria: Abnormal condition where the body excessively absorbs silver salts and deposits it in the tissues. Symptoms include gray skin and mucous membranes.
  • Aksu von Stockhausen syndrome: A rare condition observed in a Turkish family and characterized by various head and neck malformations that have resulted from abnormal development of the branchial arches.
  • Al Murrah-induced lead poisoning: Al Murrah is a folk remedy used mainly by Saudi Arabian people to treat problems such as stomach pain, diarrhea and colic. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Alarcon-induced lead poisoning: Alarcon is a folk remedy used mainly by Mexican people to treat digestive or stomach problems including indigestion and diarrhea. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Albayaidle-induced lead poisoning: Albayaidle is a folk remedy used mainly by Mexican and Central American people to treat digestive or stomach problems such as vomiting and colic. It is also used to treat apathy and lethargy. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Albayalde-induced lead poisoning: Albayalde is a folk remedy used mainly by Mexican and Central American people to treat digestive or stomach problems such as vomiting and colic. It is also used to treat apathy and lethargy. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Alcohol abuse: Excessive alcohol as a symptom of other conditions
  • Alcohol-induced pseudo-Cushing syndrome: The excessive consumption of alcohol can result in symptoms similar to a condition called Cushing's syndrome. When alcohol consumption is stopped, symptoms regress.
  • Aleukemic leukemia cutis: A rare form of leukemia where the skin is involved before the leukemic cells appear in the blood. It is usually an early sign of leukemia.
  • Alexander Syndrome: Brain myelin disorder causing mental degeneration.
  • Alpha thalassemia: Thalassemia is an inherited blood disorder characterized by abnormal synthesis of hemoglobin. Hemoglobin consists of two main protein chains called alpha and beta. Alpha thalassemia involves defects in one or more of the four genes required to make each ? protein chain. The main symptom is anemia, the severity of which can vary amongst patients depending on how many defective genes are involved.
  • Alpha thalassemia -- Hemoglobin H disease: Thalassemia is an inherited blood disorder characterized by abnormal synthesis of hemoglobin. Hemoglobin consists of two main protein chains called alpha and beta. Hemoglobin H disease involves defects in three of the four genes required to make each ? protein chain. The main symptom is moderate to severe anemia.
  • Alpha thalassemia major: Thalassemia is an inherited blood disorder characterized by abnormal synthesis of hemoglobin. Hemoglobin consists of two main protein chains called alpha and beta. Alpha thalassemia major is very rare involves defects in all of the four genes required to make each ? protein chain. The condition leads to infant death before or soon after birth.
  • Alzheimer disease 10: An inherited form of Alzheimer's. Type 10 is caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 10p13.
  • Alzheimer disease 12: An inherited form of Alzheimer's. Type 12 is caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 8p12-q22.
  • Alzheimer disease 13: An inherited form of Alzheimer's disease that is linked to a defect on chromosome 1q21. Alzheimer's disease is a progressive disorder involving degeneration of the brain. The disease mainly affects brain functions involving thinking, memory, personality and behaviour.
  • Alzheimer disease 14: An inherited form of Alzheimer's disease that is linked to a defect on chromosome 1q25. Alzheimer's disease is a progressive disorder involving degeneration of the brain. The disease mainly affects brain functions involving thinking, memory, personality and behaviour.
  • Alzheimer disease 15: An inherited form of Alzheimer's disease that is linked to a defect on chromosome 3q22-q24. Alzheimer's disease is a progressive disorder involving degeneration of the brain. The disease mainly affects brain functions involving thinking, memory, personality and behaviour.
  • Alzheimer disease 16: Alzheimer disease 16 (late-onset) is a form of Alzheimer's disease that is linked to a defect on chromosome Xq21.3. Alzheimer's disease is a progressive disorder involving degeneration of the brain. The disease mainly affects brain functions involving thinking, memory, personality and behaviour.
  • Alzheimer disease 2, late-onset: Alzheimer disease 2 (late-onset) is a form of Alzheimer's disease that is linked to a defect on chromosome 19q13.2. Alzheimer's disease is a progressive disorder involving degeneration of the brain. The disease mainly affects brain functions involving thinking, memory, personality and behaviour.
  • Alzheimer disease 3, (early-onset Alzheimer disease): Alzheimer disease 3 is an early-onset form of Alzheimer's disease that is linked to a defect on chromosome 14q24.3. Alzheimer's disease is a progressive disorder involving degeneration of the brain. The disease mainly affects brain functions involving thinking, memory, personality and behaviour.
  • Alzheimer disease 5: An inherited form of Alzheimer's. Type 5 has a late onset and is caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 12p11.
  • Alzheimer disease 6: A genetic form of Alzheimer's. Type 6 has a late onset and is caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 10q24.
  • Alzheimer disease 7: An inherited form of Alzheimer's. Type 7 is caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 10p13.
  • Alzheimer disease 8: An inherited form of Alzheimer's. Type 8 is caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 20p.
  • Alzheimer disease 9: A genetic form of Alzheimer's. Type 9 has a late onset and is caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 19p13.2.
  • Alzheimer disease, early-onset, with cerebral amyloid angiopathy: An early-onset form of Alzheimer's disease that is linked to a defect on chromosome 21q21. Alzheimer's disease is a progressive disorder involving degeneration of the brain. The disease mainly affects brain functions involving thinking, memory, personality and behaviour.
  • Alzheimer disease, familial, 1: An inherited form of Alzheimer's disease that is linked to a defect on chromosome 21q. Alzheimer's disease is a progressive disorder involving degeneration of the brain. The disease mainly affects brain functions involving thinking, memory, personality and behaviour.
  • Alzheimer disease, familial, 11: An inherited form of Alzheimer's disease that is linked to a defect on chromosome 9p22.1. Alzheimer's disease is a progressive disorder involving degeneration of the brain. The disease mainly affects brain functions involving thinking, memory, personality and behaviour.
  • Alzheimer disease, familial, 3, with spastic paraparesis and apraxia: This form of Alzheimer's is an early-onset form of Alzheimer's that is linked to a defect on chromosome 14q24.3. It is characterized by features which are atypical for Alzheimer's - spastic paraparesis which occurs before the dementia symptoms and apraxia. Alzheimer's disease is a progressive disorder involving degeneration of the brain. The disease mainly affects brain functions involving thinking, memory, personality and behaviour.
  • Alzheimer disease, familial, 3, with spastic paraparesis and unusual plaques: This form of Alzheimer's is an early-onset form of Alzheimer's that is linked to a defect on chromosome 14q24.3. It is characterized by features which are atypical for Alzheimer's - spastic paraparesis which occurs before the dementia symptoms and unusual plaques in the brain. Alzheimer's disease is a progressive disorder involving degeneration of the brain. The disease mainly affects brain functions involving thinking, memory, personality and behaviour.
  • Alzheimer disease, familial, 4: An inherited form of Alzheimer's disease that is linked to a defect on chromosome 1q31-q42. Alzheimer's disease is a progressive disorder involving degeneration of the brain. The disease mainly affects brain functions involving thinking, memory, personality and behaviour.
  • Alzheimer's disease: A progressive degenerative disease of the brain of unknown cause
  • Amphetamine abuse: Use of the stimulant drugs known as amphetamines or "speed"
  • Amphetamine withdrawal: Symptoms that occur when amphetamine use is discontinued or reduced. Symptoms may vary depending on the level of dependence. Amphetamines include dexamphetamine (speed), Ritalin and MDMA (ecstasy).
  • Ampola syndrome: A rare genetic disease characterized primarily by mental retardation, facial anomalies, short stature, seizures and finger and toe abnormalities.
  • Amyloidosis: A disease characterized by the accumulation of insoluble amyloid protein in tissues and organs which in turn affects the functioning of these tissues and organs.
  • Amyloidosis AL: A disease involving the abnormal deposit of amyloid fibrils in virtually any part of the body - the heart, liver, kidney and peripheral and autonomic nerves are most commonly affected. The abnormal amyloid fibrils are produced abnormal plasma cells in the bone marrow. In some cases, the excess growth of abnormal plasma cells can result in a cancerous condition called myeloma resulting in bone pain and infections. A patient with myeloma may develop amyloidosis but it is rare for a patient with AL amyloidosis to go on to develop myeloma.
  • Amyloidosis beta2-microglobulinic: Amyloidosis is a rare group of metabolic disorders where a protein called amyloid accumulates in body organs and tissues where it can cause damage. The type of amyloid protein involved in this type of amyloidosis is beta-2-microglobulin. The abnormal protein tends to be deposited in parts of the body such as joints, bones and carpal tunnel but can also be found in the gastrointestinal tract and other organs.
  • Amyloidosis, inflammatory: Amyloidosis is a rare group of metabolic disorders where a protein called amyloid accumulates in body organs and tissues where it can cause damage and is potentially fatal. Symptoms depend on the organs involved. Secondary amyloidosis is caused by a chronic infection of inflammatory conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, multiple myeloma, tuberculosis and osteomyelitis. The main organs affected in secondary amyloidosis are usually the kidneys, liver, spleen and lymph nodes. The peripheral and autonomic nerves and the heart are rarely affected.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: A degenerative motor neuron disease marked by weakness and wasting of the muscles which starts at the hands and legs and spreads to the rest of the body. Death occurs in 2 to 5 years. Also called Lou Gehrig's disease or wasting palsy.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 2, juvenile: An inherited disorder involving progressive degeneration of motor neurons which results in muscle weakness and wasting. Type 2 is caused by a defect on chromosome 2q33.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 3: An inherited disorder involving progressive degeneration of motor neurons which results in muscle weakness and wasting. Type 3 is caused by a defect on chromosome 18q21.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 6: An inherited disorder involving progressive degeneration of motor neurons which results in muscle weakness and wasting. Type 6 is caused by a defect on chromosome 16q12.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 7: An inherited disorder involving progressive degeneration of motor neurons which results in muscle weakness and wasting. Type 7 is caused by a defect on chromosome 20p13.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 8: An inherited disorder involving progressive degeneration of motor neurons which results in muscle weakness and wasting. Type 9 is caused by a defect on chromosome 20q13.3 and is a dominantly inherited, late-onset form.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, familial type 1: A generally fatal, inherited progressive disease where destruction of motor nerves in the spinal cord and brain stem cause progressive muscle weakness and wasting. Type 1 is characterized by adult onset and relatively fast progression of symptoms. It usually occurs in an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, familial type 2: A generally fatal, inherited progressive disease where destruction of motor nerves in the spinal cord and brain stem cause progressive muscle weakness and wasting. Type 2 is characterized by childhood or adolescent onset of symptoms which progress very slowly over decades. It occurs in an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, familial type 3: A generally fatal, inherited progressive disease where destruction of motor nerves in the spinal cord and brain stem cause progressive muscle weakness and wasting. Type 3 is characterized late adulthood onset of symptoms which progress slowly over 5 years. It occurs in an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, familial type 4: A generally fatal progressive disease where destruction of motor nerves in the spinal cord and brain stem cause progressive muscle weakness and wasting. Type 4 is characterized by the onset of symptoms before the age of 25 and slow progression over the next few decades. It occurs in an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, familial type 6: A generally fatal, inherited progressive disease where destruction of motor nerves in the spinal cord and brain stem cause progressive muscle weakness and wasting. Type 6 is characterized adult onset of symptoms with progression varying between 1 and 20 years. It occurs in an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, familial type 7: A generally fatal, inherited progressive disease where destruction of motor nerves in the spinal cord and brain stem cause progressive muscle weakness and wasting. Type 7 is characterized adult onset of symptoms with progression varying between less than 5 years to several decades. It occurs in an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, familial type 8: A generally fatal, inherited progressive disease where destruction of motor nerves in the spinal cord and brain stem cause progressive muscle weakness and wasting. Type 8 is characterized by adult onset and relatively slow progression of symptoms. It occurs in an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, type 6: An inherited disorder involving progressive degeneration of motor neurons which results in muscle weakness and wasting. Type 6 is caused by a defect on chromosome 16q12.
  • Anaplastic large cell lymphoma: A rare type of cancer where a tumor develops in lymph tissue and usually consists of white blood cells and null cells. It is a form of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The tumors can develop in more than one lymph node and can also occur in the skin and various organs such as the liver, bones or lungs.
  • Anaplastic small cell lymphoma: A rare type of cancer where a tumor develops in lymph tissue and consists mainly of small cells. It is a form of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The tumors can develop in more than one lymph node and can also occur in the skin and various organs such as the liver, bones or lungs.
  • Andrade's syndrome: An inherited condition characterized by deposits of an abnormal protein called amyloid in various parts of the body including organs. The condition mainly involves neurological symptoms.
  • Anemia: Reduced red blood cells in the blood
  • Anemia of pregnancy: Anemia of pregnancy is anemia that occurs during pregnancy. Women's bodies have a greater demand for iron during pregnancy and if intake is not sufficient, anemia can result. Anemia in pregnant women can lead to infant problems such as premature birth, fetal death, retarded growth and other problems.
  • Anemia, Iron-Deficiency: A lack of fully functioning red blood cells due to a deficiency of iron. The iron allows the body to make hemoglobin in red blood cells which in turn allows the red blood cell to carry oxygen.
  • Anemia, Neonatal: Insufficient red blood cells that can carry oxygen around the body. It is common in premature births or can occur as a result of blood loss before, during or just after the birth.
  • Anemia, Refractory, with Excess of Blasts: A bone marrow disease which results in insufficient red blood cells in the blood (anemia). The prognosis is poor with death usually occurring within a couple of years. There are two types: type 1 refers to cases where the level of blasts is less than 10% and type 2 refers to cases where the level of blasts is 10-20%. When too many immature blood cells (blasts) are produced by the bone marrow, the condition may progress to acute myeloid leukemia - occurs in about a quarter of cases in type 1 and a third of cases in type 2.
  • Anemia, Refractory, with Excess of Blasts, type 1: A bone marrow disease which results in insufficient red blood cells in the blood (anemia). The prognosis is poor with death usually occurring within a couple of years. Type 1 refers to cases where the level of blasts is less than 10% and type 2 refers to cases where the level of blasts is 10-20%. When too many immature blood cells (blasts) are produced by the bone marrow, the condition may progress to acute myeloid leukemia - occurs in about a quarter of cases in type 1.
  • Anemia, Refractory, with Excess of Blasts, type 2: A bone marrow disease which results in insufficient red blood cells in the blood (anemia). The prognosis is poor with death usually occurring within a couple of years. Type 1 refers to cases where the level of blasts is less than 10% and type 2 refers to cases where the level of blasts is 10-20%. When too many immature blood cells (blasts) are produced by the bone marrow, the condition may progress to acute myeloid leukemia - occurs in about a third of cases in type 2.
  • Anemia, hypochromic microcytic: A blood disorder where red blood cells are too small and lack sufficient iron. It can be inherited or caused by insufficient iron in the diet or from a genetic disorder.
  • Anemic -- hematuria syndrome: An epidemic disease in Argentina which has a prolonged recovery time but usually there are no complications. Symptoms vary between seasons so that affected patients suffer anorexia, vomiting, diarrhea and dehydration in summer but suffer reduced urination, excess blood, albumin and renal casts in the urine. Other symptoms occur irrespective of the season.
  • Anesthetic agent-induced liver damage: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to anesthetic agents. Anesthetic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anesthetic agent-induced liver damage -- Chloroform: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anesthetic agent called chloroform. Anesthetic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anesthetic agent-induced liver damage -- Cyclopropane: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anesthetic agent called cyclopropane. Anesthetic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anesthetic agent-induced liver damage -- Ether: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anesthetic agent called ether. Anesthetic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anesthetic agent-induced liver damage -- Halothane: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anesthetic agent called halothane. Anesthetic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anesthetic agent-induced liver damage -- Methoxyflurane: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anesthetic agent called methoxyflurane. Anesthetic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anesthetic agent-induced liver damage -- Nitrous Oxide: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anesthetic agent called nitrous oxide. Anesthetic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Angelman-Like Syndrome, X-linked: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by mental retardation, mutism, facial anomalies, epilepsy and weak eye muscles. Males tended to have severe mental retardation whereas female carriers had mild or no mental retardation. Patients do eventually walk but then often lose this ability by the age of 10 years. Female carriers tend to have mild symptoms and males have severe symptoms - symptoms are variable to some degree.
  • Angiofollicular ganglionic hyperplasia -- plasma cell type: A rare disorder characterized by a localized overgrowth of lymph node tissue which can form a benign tumor-like growth. There are two types of the disease: hyaline-vascular type or the plasma cell type which tends to have more severe symptoms. The plasma-cell type tends to involve systemic symptoms such as fever and weight loss due to the destruction of red blood cells.
  • Angiostrongyliasis: Infection by a parasitic worm (Angiostrongylus). Infection can occur through eating contaminated raw animals such as snails, slugs, prawns or crabs which act as hosts to these parasites.
  • Ankyloglossia -- heterochromia -- clasped thumbs: An extremely rare inherited condition characterized by clasped thumbs (adducted thumb), different colored eyes and a tongue anomaly where the tongue has limited mobility due to the fact that it is excessively attached to the floor of the mouth.
  • Ankylosing Spondylitis: A form of chronic inflammation of the spine which may also affect joints in the shoulder, hip, neck, ribs and jaw. May result in loss of mobility. Also called Marie-Strumpell disease.
  • Ankylosing spondylarthritis: Inflammation of one or more spine joints. The spine becomes progressively painful and stiff and the spine joints may eventually fuse and cause disability. The condition may vary from mild to severe. Inflammation can affect other joints and tissues.
  • Annular pancreas: An abnormality where a ring of pancreatic tissue forms around the duodenum and can block the flow of food through the digestive system. The severity of symptoms depends on the degree of constriction. Partial obstruction may not be detected until adulthood.
  • Anorexia: This is known as a lack of or loss of appetite for food
  • Anorexia Nervosa: A disorder where a distorted sense of body image leads to self-starvation to the point of death in some cases.
  • Anorexia in children: Anorexia in children refers to a extreme loss of appetite in a child that is often coupled with weight loss.
  • Anorexia nervosa, genetic types: There is mounting evidence that anorexia nervosa may be caused by genetic factors which when combined with psychosocial factors can increase a persons risk of developing the condition.
  • Anterior pituitary hyperhormonotrophic syndrome: A syndrome characterized by the excessive production of various hormones (gonadotrophic, thyrotrophic, lactotrophic and pancreatrophic hormone).
  • Anthrax: A serious infectious bacterial disease that can be fatal.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage: Damage or injury to the liver caused by taking certain antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Cephalosporin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Cephalosporin antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Chloramphenicol: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antibiotic called Chloramphenicol. Chloramphenicol a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Clindamycin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Clindamycin antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Erythromycin Ethyl succinate: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Erythromycin Ethyl succinate antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Erythromycin estolate: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure Erythromycin estolate antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Nitrofuran: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Nitrofuran antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Novobiocin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Novobiocin antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Penicillin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Penicillin antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Quinolone: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Quinolone antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Rifampicin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Rifampicin antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Spectinomycin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Spectinomycin antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Sulfones: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to sulfone antiboitics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Telithromycin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Telithromycin antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Tetracycline: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Tetracycline antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anticonvulsive-induced liver damage: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to anticonvulsives. Anticonvulsives are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anticonvulsive-induced liver damage -- Mephenytoin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anticonvulsive called mephenytoin. Anticonvulsives are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anticonvulsive-induced liver damage -- Phenobarbital: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anticonvulsive called phenobarbital. Anticonvulsives are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anticonvulsive-induced liver damage -- Phenytoin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anticonvulsive called Phenytoin. Anticonvulsives are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anticonvulsive-induced liver damage -- Valproic Acid: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anticonvulsive called valproic acid. Anticonvulsives are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antifungal agent-induced liver damage: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to antifungal agents. Antifungal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antifungal agent-induced liver damage -- 5-Fluorocytosine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antifungal agent called 5-Fluorocytosine. Antifungal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antifungal agent-induced liver damage -- Amphotericin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antifungal agent called Amphotericin. Antifungal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antifungal agent-induced liver damage -- Griseofulvin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antifungal agent called Griseofulvin. Antifungal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antifungal agent-induced liver damage -- Ketoconazole: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antifungal agent called Ketoconazole. Antifungal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antifungal agent-induced liver damage -- Saramycetin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antifungal agent called Saramycetin. Antifungal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antimetazoal agent-induced liver damage: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Antimetazoal agents. Antimetazoal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antimetazoal agent-induced liver damage -- Amodiaquine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antimetazoal agent called amodiaquine. Antimetazoal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antimetazoal agent-induced liver damage -- Hycanthone: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiprotozoal agent called hycanthone. Antimetazoal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiprotozoal agent-induced liver damage: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to antiprotozoal agents. Antiprotozoal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiprotozoal agent-induced liver damage -- 8-Hydroxyquinolone: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiprotozoal agent called 8-Hydroxyquinolone. Antiprotozoal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiprotozoal agent-induced liver damage -- Carbarsone: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiprotozoal agent called carbarsone. Antiprotozoal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiprotozoal agent-induced liver damage -- Emetine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiprotozoal agent called emetine. Antiprotozoal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiprotozoal agent-induced liver damage -- Mepacrine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiprotozoal agent called mepacrine. Antiprotozoal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiprotozoal agent-induced liver damage -- Metronidazole: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiprotozoal agent called Metronidazole. Antiprotozoal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiprotozoal agent-induced liver damage -- Thiabendazole: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiprotozoal agent called Thiabendazole. Antiprotozoal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antituberculous agent-induced liver damage: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to antituberculous agents. Antituberculous agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antituberculous agent-induced liver damage -- Cycloserine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antituberculous agent called cycloserine. Antituberculous agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antituberculous agent-induced liver damage -- Ethionamide: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antituberculous agent called ethionamide. Antituberculous agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antituberculous agent-induced liver damage -- Isoniazid: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antituberculous agent called isoniazid. Antituberculous agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antituberculous agent-induced liver damage -- Rifampicin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antituberculous agent called rifampicin. Antituberculous agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antituberculous agent-induced liver damage -- p-aminosalicylic acid: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antituberculous agent called p-aminosalicylic acid. Antituberculous agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiviral agent-induced liver damage: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to antiviral agents. Antiviral agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiviral agent-induced liver damage -- Cytarabine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiviral agent called cytarabine. Antiviral agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiviral agent-induced liver damage -- Vidarabine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiviral agent called vidarabine. Antiviral agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiviral agent-induced liver damage -- idoxuridine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiviral agent called idoxuridine. Antiviral agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiviral agent-induced liver damage -- xenylamine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiviral agent called xenylamine. Antiviral agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anxiety: Excessive worry, anxiety, or fear.
  • Anxiety disorder: A mental condition that is characterized by anxiety and avoidance behaviours
  • Aortic arch interruption: A rare genetic birth defect where a portion of the aortic arch is missing or discontinued which severely impairs the flow of oxygenated blood to the lower body.
  • Aortic arches defect: A defect in the top part of the aorta (aortic arch) that consists of several arterial branches. There is a variety of defects that can occur and symptoms will be determined by the particular defect involved. Possible types of defects includes aortic coarctation and aortic arch hypoplasia.
  • Aortic supravalvular stenosis: A rare congenital condition involving increased intestinal calcium absorption and characterized by development delay, distinctive facial features, small nails and short stature.
  • Aplasia cutis congenital -- intestinal lymphangiectasia: A rare disorder characterized by a skin defect and dilated intestinal lymph vessels.
  • Appendicitis/acute appendicitis/chronic appendicitis:
  • Appendix disorders: Disorders that affect the appendix
  • Appetite changes: Inappropriately reduced or increased appetite.
  • Apple seed poisoning: Apple seeds contain a toxic chemical called amygdalin which can cause serious symptoms if eaten in large quantities. Hospital admission is recommended if more than 50 apple seeds have been consumed.
  • Arbovirus: Any group of viruses transmitted to humans by mosquitoes and ticks
  • Argentinean hemorrhagic fever: An infectious disease caused by the Junin virus. Transmission can occur through contact with infected rodent (usually the corn mouse) urine, feces or saliva. The incubation period lasts from one to two weeks. The disease is most common in rural workers in Argentina.
  • Arginase deficiency: A very rare urea cycle disorder caused by a deficiency of the enzyme (arginase) needed to convert ammonia to the urea which can then be removed in the urine. The condition leads to excess build-up of ammonia in the body which is toxic to the nervous system.
  • Argininosuccinase lyase deficiency, neonatal: A rare inherited urea cycle disorder caused by lack of enzymes (argininosuccinase lyase) needed to turn ammonia into urea resulting in excess ammonia in the body. The neonatal form of the condition can result in death or severe complications if not treated early enough.
  • Argininosuccinic aciduria: A rare inherited disorder of the urea cycle characterized by the lack of an enzyme (argininosuccinate lyase) which is needed to remove nitrogen from the body so a lack of the enzyme leads to a build-up of ammonia in the blood.
  • Arizona Bark Scorpion poisoning: A bite from the Arizona Bark scorpion contains chemicals toxic to the nerve system and can cause serious, life-threatening symptoms.
  • Arnold-Chiari malformation type 3: An extremely rare malformation where the base of the brain enters into the upper spinal canal. Type 3 involves the herniation of brain or brain stem tissue out of the back of the neck or head. The condition generally has a poor prognosis.
  • Aromatic amino acid decarboxylase deficiency: A rare inborn error of metabolism involving the deficiency of an enzyme (aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase) needed to process aromatic amino acids. This results in a deficiency of neurotransmitters such as dopamine and serotonin. The condition manifests as movement and neurological problems.
  • Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita -- pulmonary hypoplasia: A rare congenital syndrome involving degeneration of the brain and spinal cord and characterized by facial, head, skeletal and muscular abnormalities. Reduced fetal activity causes many of the problems.
  • Ascariasis: Large intestinal roundworm from 6 to 13 inches.
  • Asherson syndrome: The failure of a muscle at the top of the esophagus to relax and allow food and liquid to pass through. Liquid and even food may accidentally be inhaled and can lead to pneumonia and death in some cases.
  • Astrocytoma: A malignant tumour of the nervous system composed of astrocytes.
  • Ataxia Telangiectasia: A rare inherited childhood disorder involving progressive degeneration of the nervous system.
  • Athabaskan brainstem dysgenesis: A rare neurological disorder caused by abnormal brainstem development and function.
  • Athabaskan severe combined immunodeficiency: A severe immunodeficiency disorder found in Navajo and Apache populations.
  • Athetoid Cerebral Palsy: Cerebral palsy is movement disorder originating from some sort of damage to the brain. There are a few different types of cerebral palsy e.g. spastic, athetoid and ataxic. Athetoid cerebral palsy is characterized by athetoid movements which are slow, writhing involuntary muscle movements.
  • Athyrotic hypothyroidism sequence: A rare congenital disorder characterized by a thyroid gland defect.
  • Austrian syndrome: A condition where alcoholism is associated with heart failure and pneumococcal meningitis.
  • Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia: Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is characterized by an abnormal immune system response which leads to the destruction of red blood cells and hence anemia. The severity of the condition varies depending on the underlying cause e.g. cytomegalovirus, hepatitis, HIV and lupus. The condition may develop gradually or occur suddenly and cause serious symptoms.
  • Autoimmune Hepatitis: Liver inflammation caused due to autoimmune processes where the body's immune system attacks the liver.
  • Autoimmune enteropathy: A very rare condition that occurs when the body's own immune system attacks the intestinal wall and affect the way it absorbs food.
  • Autoimmune enteropathy, type 1: A rare condition involving autoimmune problems which can variably manifest as enteropathy (diarrhea), hemolytic anemia, and endocrine gland diseases such as diabetes mellitus and thyroid disease. Resistance to viral infections is poor. The condition is life-threatening, especially during infancy and early childhood. As the condition is inherited in a X-linked manner, males tend to suffer severe symptoms whereas females suffer few if any symptoms as they are a carrier of the condition.
  • Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy syndrome, type 1: A very rare autoimmune disorder characterized by autoimmune polyendocrinopathy (APE), candidiasis (C) and ectodermal dysplasia (ED).
  • Autonomic nerve disorders: A disorder of the nervous system concerned with regulation of activity of cardiac muscle, smooth muscle, and glands, usually restricted to the sympathetic and parasympathetic systems
  • Autonomic neuropathy: A condition which is characterized by a functional disturbance or pathological change in the autonomic nervous system
  • Autosomal recessive spastic paraplegia, type 11:
  • Avellis's syndrome: Damage to a part of the brain stem (nucleus ambiguous) which affects signals being sent to the vagus nerve which controls the pharynx and larynx. Paralysis occurs on one side of the palate and vocal cord and loss of sensation in the other side of the body. The damage may be due to such things as trauma, cancer or toxicity.
  • Azarcon-induced lead poisoning: Azarcon is a lead-containing tetraoxide salt used mainly by Mexican people to treat digestive or stomach problems including indigestion and diarrhea. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia: A slow progressing disease involving cancerous B-cell lymphocytes which take over the healthy cells in the lymph nodes. B-cells help the body to fight infections so when the disease becomes more advanced, the body is less able to fight infection as there are fewer healthy, functioning B-cells.
  • B-cell lymphomas: A group cancers involving the proliferation of lymphocytic B-cells. Examples include small lymphocytic lymphoma, immunoblastic lymphoma and lymphoblastic lymphoma.
  • BANF acoustic neurinoma: A type of tumor that affects hearing and is associated with a condition called BANF (bilateral acoustic neurofibromatosis). The tumor is benign an occurs in the cells that form the myelin sheath of the vestibulocochlear nerve. The symptoms vary depending on the size and exact location of the nerve. The tumor may become large enough to compress against various cranial nerves or even the brainstem.
  • BBB syndrome, X-linked: A rare genetic disorder characterized by defects along the midline of the body. The type and severity of symptoms can vary considerably. There are two subtypes of the disorder: type I is inherited in a X-linked manner and type II is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner. Females with type I tend to have few if any symptoms - often the only symptom is wide-set eyes.
  • Ba Bow Sen-induced lead poisoning: Ba Bow Sen is a folk remedy used mainly by Chinese people to treat childhood hyperactivity and to alleviate nightmares. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Baber's syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized by the association of congenital liver cirrhosis with Fanconi syndrome.
  • Babinski-Nageotte syndrome: A rare disorder caused by damage to a part of the brain (medullobulbar transitional area) which causes a variety of neurological symptoms, some of which affect only one side of the body.
  • Back tumour: The presence of tumour growth in the vertebra, whether due to primary malignancies e.g. leukaemic or myeloma infiltration of the bone marrow, or due to secondary metastases from another site e.g. lung or breast.
  • Bacterial endocarditis: Infection and inflammation of the inner layers of the heart, most commonly the valves cause by bacteria.
  • Bacterial meningitis: Bacterial meningitis is a form of meningitis caused by bacteria that normally lives in the mouth and throat. When the immune system is unable to supress this bacteria, it travels to the cerebrospinal spinal fluid in the brain. From there it affects the membranes surrounding the brain.
  • Bali goli-induced lead poisoning: Bali goli (flat black bean) is a folk remedy used mainly by Indian and Asian people to treat intestinal problems. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Bard-Pic syndrome: A complication of advanced pancreatic cancer marked by jaundice and enlarged gallbladder.
  • Bare lymphocyte syndrome: An inherited immunodeficiency disorder characterized by T- and B-cell dysfunction (these cells are essential for helping fight infection). Lack of treatment can result in infant death from infection.
  • Barrett Esophagus: Pre-malignant syndrome of the lower oesophagus characteries by columnar epithelium with areas of metaplasia.
  • Barrett syndrome: Barrett's syndrome refers to cellular changes in the lower portion of the oesophagus as a result of chronic reflux. The changes in the cells of the esophagus can lead to cancer of the esophagus (adenocarcinoma).
  • Bartonella infections: Infection with bacteria from the Bartonella genus of bacteria. Specific bacteria from within this group are Bartonella bacilliforms (Oroya fever), Bartonella Heneslae (Cat-scratch disease). Other conditions caused by this bacteria are endocarditis, bacteremia and angiomatosis. Symptoms vary depending on the type of bacteria involved and the severity of the infection - immunocompromised patients face greater risk of severe infection.
  • Bartter Syndrome: A rare genetic disorder of kidney metabolism characterized by reduced blood acidity and low potassium levels.
  • Basal ganglia disease, biotin-responsive: A neurological disease that affects the part of the brain called the basal ganglia. The disease responds well to biotin administration but relapses within a month if the biotin is stopped. If the condition is diagnosed late or there are recurring episodes, the patient may suffer ongoing symptoms such as paraparesis, mild mental retardation or dystonia.
  • Basilar artery insufficiency: refers to a temporary set of symptoms due to decreased blood flow in the posterior circulation of the brain
  • Basilar artery insufficiency syndrome: A range of symptoms caused by impaired blood flow through the basilar artery. The symptoms may come and go according to variation in blood flow through the basilar artery. The blood flow may be impaired by such things as thrombosis, narrowed artery and blood vessel spasms. Symptoms vary depending on the exact location and extent of the artery involvement as well as whether the onset is gradual or sudden.
  • Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome: An inherited disorder marked by gigantism, exomphalos and macroglossia. Also called EMG syndrome and exophthalmos-macroglossia-gigantism syndrome.
  • Behcet's syndrome: Recurring inflammation of small blood vessels affecting various areas.
  • Bell's palsy: A one sided muscle paralysis of sudden onset due to a problem with the facial nerve
  • Benzodiazepine abuse: Abuse of benzodiazepine tranquiliser medications
  • Bergman syndrome: A rare disorder which may be acquired or present at birth. A part of the stomach pushes above the diaphragm and compresses the chest organs which can produce various symptoms.
  • Beriberi: Disease due to vitamin B1 deficiency (thiamine)
  • Bernheim's syndrome: Reduced size of right heart ventricle due to enlargement of the left ventricle which encroaches on the space in the right ventricle. Blood flow from the right atrium to the right ventricle is obstructed.
  • Bertielliasis: A parasitic intestinal infection caused by a nematode called Bertiella. The parasite commonly infects koalas, possums and primates but can occur in humans. Transmission usually occurs through accidental ingestion of infected fleas.
  • Beta Thalassemia intermedia: Thalassemia is an inherited blood disorder characterized by abnormal synthesis of hemoglobin. There are two subtypes of the disorder (alpha and beta) depending on what portion of the hemoglobin is abnormally synthesized. Beta Thalassemia intermedia involves defects in both of the two genes required to make each ? protein chain. The condition causes varying degrees of moderate anemia.
  • Beta thalassemia: Thalassemia is an inherited blood disorder characterized by abnormal synthesis of hemoglobin. Hemoglobin consists of two main protein chains called alpha and beta. Beta thalassemia involves defects in one or more of the two genes required to make each ? protein chain. The main symptom is anemia, the severity of which can vary amongst patients depending on how many defective genes are involved.
  • Bile acid synthesis defect, congenital, 2: A defect which prevents the body from making bile acid which results in progressive liver disease. The defect is a deficiency of a particular enzyme (cholestasis with delta(4)-3-oxosteroid 5-beta-reductase) needed to make bile acid.
  • Bile acid synthesis defect, congenital, 4: A defect which prevents the body from making bile acid which results in progressive liver disease.
  • Bile acid synthesis defects: A defect which prevents the body from making bile acid which results in progressive liver disease.
  • Bile acid synthesis defects, congenital, 1: A defect which prevents the body from making bile acid which results in progressive liver disease. The defect is a deficiency of a particular enzyme (3-beta-hydroxy-delta-5-C27-steroid oxidoreductase) needed to make bile acid.
  • Bile acid synthesis defects, congenital, 2: A defect which prevents the body from making bile acid which results in progressive liver disease. The defect is a deficiency of a particular enzyme (cholestasis with delta(4)-3-oxosteroid 5-beta-reductase) needed to make bile acid.
  • Bile acid synthesis defects, congenital, 3: A defect which prevents the body from making bile acid which results in progressive liver disease. The defect involved a deficiency of 7-alpha-hydroxylase which is an enzyme needed to prevent the accumulation of 27-hydroxycholesterol which is toxic to the liver.
  • Bile acid synthesis defects, congenital, 4: A defect which prevents the body from making bile acid which results in progressive liver disease.
  • Biliary conditions: Medical conditions affecting the biliary system (liver, bile ducts, gallbladder, etc.) in digestion.
  • Biliary tract cancer: Cancer that develops in the gallbladder or bile ducts.
  • Bindewald-Ulmer-Muller syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by a heart defect, and mental and growth retardation.
  • Bing-Neel syndrome: A rare disorder involving infiltration of the central nervous system by abnormal leukemia-like cells (lymphoplasmocytoid cells) that occur in Waldenström's macroglobulinemia. The abnormality increases blood viscosity which impairs its circulation through small brain and eye blood vessels.
  • Binge eating: A condition which is characterized by the eating of copious amounts of food
  • Binge eating disorder: Excessive overeating but without purging
  • Bint Al Zahab-induced lead poisoning: Bint Al Zahab is a folk remedy used by various ethnic groups (e.g. Indians, Saudi Arabians) to treat infant colic and to facilitate the passage of meconium in newborns. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Biotinidase deficiency: A metabolic disorder where the body lacks the enzyme biotinidase needed to process the vitamin called biotin (vitamin H) into carboxylase enzymes.
  • Bipolar disorder: Cycles of mania and depression; commonly called "manic-depression".
  • Bird flu (avian influenza): Bird flu refers to influenza A invection. Influenza A is a viral respiratory infection that can usually occurs in birds (especially poultry) but can be transmitted to humans and cause serious illness. The virus is contagious and can cause severe illness especially in patients who are very young or old or have some other medical condition as well. The severity of symptoms can vary but usually involves respiratory and constitutional (e.g. headache, aching muscles) symptoms. The influenza virus can mutate and produce different strains though the symptoms are the same. This frequent mutation means that people need regular vaccinations to ensure they are protected against new strains as they arise.
  • Birth symptoms: Symptoms related to childbirth.
  • Blaichman syndrome: A very rare genetic disorder characterized by a malformation where there is an opening between the trachea and esophagus. Webbing of the fifth finger is also present.
  • Blind loop syndrome: A rare intestinal defect where there is a small loop in the intestines that allow digesting material to enter but not exit. The symptoms are variable depending on the size and location of the pouch.
  • Blood cancer: Malignancy of one or several of the different types of cells in the blood
  • Bloom Syndrome: A rare genetic inherited genetic disorder which mainly affects Ashkenazic Jewish people and is characterized by short stature, malar hypoplasia, and a telangiectatic erythema of the face.
  • Blue Diaper Syndrome: A rare metabolic disorder characterized by vision problems, bluish urine, fever and digestive anomalies.
  • Bokhoor-induced lead poisoning: Bokhoor is a traditional used mainly by Saudi Arabian people to calm infants - it involves burning wood and lead sulphide and inhaling the fumes that are produced. This practice has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to the relatively high exposure to lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Bolivian hemorrhagic fever: An infectious disease that occurs in Bolivia and is caused by the Machupo virus. Transmission can occur through contact with infected rodent (Calomys callosus) droppings. The incubation period lasts from one to two weeks.
  • Bonnier's syndrome: A range of symptoms caused by damage to Dieter's nucleus (the lateral nucleus of the vestibular nerve) or its connections.
  • Borderline Personality Disorder: Mental condition with behavioral and emotional problems.
  • Boron overuse: Consumption of high doses of the mineral boron can cause various symptoms.
  • Bothriocephalosis: Infection with an intestinal parasite. The parasite is a fish tapeworm called Diphyllobothrium latum. Human infection is caused by eating undercooked contaminated fish.
  • Botulism food poisoning: Extremely dangerous food poisoning requiring medical attention, but not always recognized because of its non-abdominal symptoms.
  • Bouillaud's syndrome: Heart inflammation caused by rheumatism. The inner lining of the heart (endocardium) as well as the membrane surrounding the heart (pericardium) become inflamed.
  • Box Jellyfish poisoning: A sting from the Box jellyfish contains a chemical which is toxic to the nerves, heart and skin. This jellyfish is mainly found in the waters of Northern Queensland in Australia. The tentacles should not be removed from the patient as it can cause further injection of poison.
  • Boyd-Stearns syndrome: A rare syndrome associated with various metabolic disorders such as glycosuria, acidosis, albuminuria and hypochloremia. Symptoms include rickets during infancy, short stature, low blood phosphate levels, malnutrition and osteoporosis.
  • Brain tumor, adult: A growth or tumor that develops in the tissues of the brain in adults. The tumor can be benign or malignant.
  • Breast Duct Papilloma: Benign tumour of the collecting duct of the breast.
  • Brennemann's syndrome: Abdominal symptoms that can result from an upper respiratory infection. The abdominal symptoms are caused by inflammation of the abdominal lymph nodes. The condition is most likely to occur in children.
  • Breynia officinalis poisoning: Ingestion of the Breynia officinalis plant can cause irritation to mucosal linings and liver problems. The plant is often used as a herbal drug (Chi R Yun) to treat such things as poor growth, heart failure and venereal disease.
  • Bright's Disease: A condition where the parts of the kidneys that are responsible for filtering become inflamed and results in blood and proteins accidentally leaking into the urine. The condition can occur after certain infections and serious kidney dysfunction can result in severe or chronic complications.
  • Brinton disease: Thickening and hardening of the stomach wall usually associated with diffuse stomach cancer or damage due to the consumption of caustic soda.
  • Bronchogenic carcinoma: When cells of the lung start growing rapidly in an uncontrolled manner, the condition is called lung cancer .
  • Brown snake poisoning: The Brown snake is a poisonous Australian snake. They are considered one of the most venomous snakes in the world and their bite can result in death without prompt medical attention. The snake venom contains toxins which affect the blood and nerve systems. Children tend to suffer more severe symptoms due to their smaller body size.
  • Brown-Symmers disease: A rare form of brain inflammation that occurs in children and can quickly lead to death. Symptoms usually start suddenly.
  • Brown-Vialetto-Van Laere syndrome: A very rare progressive disorder characterized by nerve deafness and cranial (and sometimes spinal) nerve paralysis.
  • Bulimia nervosa: Eating disorder with binging (overeating) and purging (vomiting).
  • Busulfan toxicity syndrome: Symptoms caused by the use of a chemotherapy drug called Busulfan.
  • Byler Disease: A rare inherited conditions where bile is unable to drain from the liver where it builds up and causes progressive liver damage. The conditions has an early onset and usually leads to end-stage liver disease by the end of the second decade.
  • Bébé Collodion syndrome: A rare birth abnormality where an infant is born covered in a tight, yellow, shiny membrane. The membrane peels off and may reform several times. As the membrane dries it can leave crack which can result in infection, dehydration or inability to control body temperature. The tight skin can also affect breathing and feeding ability or impair blood supply to limbs. In mild cases the underlying skin may be normal. 10% of cases resolve themselves within a few weeks of birth.
  • CAMFAK syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by cataracts, small head, failure to thrive and spinal curvature.
  • CANOMAD syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by a range of abnormalities caused by immune-mediated nerve demyelination. There is usually no loss of limb function associated with the disorder. The face, throat, mouth and eye symptoms (weakness of the muscles) usually come and go.
  • CDG syndrome type 1A: A very rare inherited metabolic disorder where defective carbohydrate compounds are attached to glycoproteins and thus impairing glycoprotein function. Type 1A involves a phosphomannomutase enzyme defect and affects most body systems especially the nervous system and liver function.
  • CDG syndrome type I: A rare genetic disorder where the body is unable to synthesize glycoproteins which results in multisystem problems.
  • CDG syndrome type Ic: A very rare inherited metabolic disorder where defective carbohydrate compounds are attached to glycoproteins and thus impairing glycoprotein function. Type 1C has a differs from the other subtypes by the type of enzyme which is deficient.
  • Cachexia: physical wasting with loss of weight and muscle mass caused by disease
  • Caffeine Allergy: A caffeine allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to caffeine or caffeine-containing products. The type and severity of symptoms can vary amongst patients.
  • Camera-Marugo-Cohen syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by mental retardation, muscle weakness, obesity and an asymmetrical body.
  • Campomelic dwarfism: A rare genetic disorder characterized by bowed tibia, underdeveloped shoulder blades and a flat face.
  • Campomelic dysplasia: A rare genetic disorder characterized by bowed tibia, underdeveloped shoulder blades and a flat face.
  • Camptomelic dysplasia I: A rare condition characterized by dwarfism due to bowed shin and thigh bones.
  • Camptomelic dysplasia II: A rare condition characterized by dwarfism due to bowed shin and thigh bones which tend to be shorter and wider than normal.
  • Camurati-Engelmann Disease: A very rare genetic disease thickening of areas of bone causing pain, weakness and wasting. Usually affects the legs during childhood. Also called diaphyseal dysplasia.
  • Canavan disease: Rare genetic degenerative brain disease in infants.
  • Cancer: Abnormal overgrowth of body cells.
  • Candida esophagitis: Candida esophagitis is a fungal or yeast infection of the esophagus. It generally occurs secondary to a fungal infection of the mouth and primarily affects patients with poor immune system function.
  • Capillaria philippiensis infection: A fish borne parasite that can infect humans. Transmission most often occurs through ingestion of contaminated fish. Severity of symptoms tend to increase as the number of worms multiply in the intestines. Death can occur if the condition is left untreated.
  • Carbamoyl-phosphate synthase 1 deficiency: A very rare inherited urea cycle disorder where the lack of the enzyme carbamoyl phosphate synthetase prevents ammonia from being turned into urea and being excreted in the urine. Excess ammonia builds up in the body which can cause serious complications or even death if left untreated.
  • Carcinoma of the vocal tract: Cancer of the vocal cords in the larynx.
  • Carcinoma, squamous cell of head and neck: A type of cancer that occurs in the mucosal lining of parts of the head and neck e.g. esophagus, sinuses, nasal cavity, pharynx, mouth and lips. Symptoms will vary depending on the exact location of the cancer.
  • Cardiac malformation: Any malformation or structural defect of the heart or it's structures. Some examples include atrioventricular septal defect, conotruncal malformations, transposition of great vessels and heart valve dysplasia. The symptoms vary in nature and severity depending on the type of malformation.
  • Cardiomyopathy -- hypogonadism -- metabolic anomalies: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by heart muscle disease, hypogonadism, blindness, deafness and metabolic anomalies. Puberty was normal despite the hypogonadism.
  • Cardiomyopathy -- spherocytosis: A rare disorder characterized by the association of spherocytosis with heart muscle disease. Spherocytosis is a red blood cell disorder where the red blood cells have abnormal membranes which gives them a spherical shape and makes them weak resulting in their premature death.
  • Cardiomyopathy due to anthracyclines: Damage to the heart muscle caused by anthracycline drugs which are used in chemotherapy. The damage occurs more frequently with higher cumulative doses. Often the patients have no symptoms of the heart damage for many year.
  • Cardiomyopathy, Alcoholic: A weakened heart mucle due to excessive alcohol consumption. Symptoms are usually not evident until the heart becomes severely damaged.
  • Cardiomyopathy, X-linked, fatal infantile: An inherited form of heart muscle disease where the heart ventricles become dilated which affects the hearts ability to function normally. The condition occurs during infancy and results in death.
  • Cardiomyopathy, familial dilated: An inherited form of heart muscle disease where the heart ventricles become dilated which affects the hearts ability to function normally.
  • Cardiospasm: Failure of the lower oesophageal sphincter to relax, resulting in food build up in the upper oesophagus.
  • Carotid Paraganglioma: A rare, usually benign tumor found in the carotid artery in the neck. The tumor develops from glomus cells which are located along blood vessels involved in automatic body activities such as regulation of blood pressure and blood flow.
  • Cat scratch disease: An infectious disease transmitted through a cat's bite, scratch or lick and resulting primarily in lymph node pain and swelling. The condition can be mild or severe.
  • Cat's cry: A chromosomal disorder marked by microcephaly, epicanthal folds, micrognathia, strabismus, mental and physical retardation, and a characteristic catlike whine
  • Cathinone poisoning: Cathinone comes from the leaves of the Khat plant which is native to eastern Africa. Cathinone is a stimulant as well as have pain killing, weight loss and neuromuscular effects. The psychoactive effects are usually utilized by chewing on the leaves of the plant but sometimes dried leaves are used.
  • Cebagin-induced lead poisoning: Cebagin is a folk remedy used mainly by Middle Eastern people to treat teething. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Celiac disease -- epilepsy -- occipital calcifications: A rare syndrome characterized by celiac disease and epilepsy with brain calcifications.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 1: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 6p21.3. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 10: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 3q25-q26. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 11: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 3q28. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 12: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 6q25.3. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 13: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect in the SH2B3 gene on chromosome 12q24. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 2: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 5q31-q33. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 3: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 2q33. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 4: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 19p13.1. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 5: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 15q11-q13. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 6: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 4q27. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 7: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 1q31. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 8: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 2q11-q12. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 9: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 3p21. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Cephalosporin-induced Immune Hemolytic Anemia: Cephalosporin-induced immune hemolytic anemia is a condition where a use of a medication called Cephalosporin triggers the body's immune system to destroy it's own red blood cells which results in anemia.
  • Cerebelloparenchymal autosomal recessive disorder 3: A rare, recessively inherited disorder characterized mainly by albinism, incoordination, low muscle tone and eye problems.
  • Cerebral Palsy: Any brain disorder causing movement disability
  • Cerebral ventricle neoplasm: A tumor that occurs in the fluid-filled spaces of the brain called the ventricles. Symptoms vary depending on the size and exact location of the tumor and whether it is cancerous or not.
  • Cerebrovascular Conditions: Conditions of the brain's blood vessels including stroke.
  • Cervical cancer: A condition which is characterized by the occurrence of malignancy on the cervix
  • Chagas disease: A parasitic infection caused by the protozoa Trypanosoma cruzi and transmitted by insect bites or blood transfusions. The disease primarily involves the heart and gastrointestinal system.
  • Change in appetite as seen in chronic digestive diseases: decreased or increase in appetite
  • Change in appetite similar to that in depression: decreased or increase in appetite
  • Chemical addiction: Addiction to and abuse of various substances.
  • Chemical pneumonia: Lung inflammation from inhaled chemicals
  • Chemical poisoning -- 1,2-Dibromoethane: 1,2-Dibromoethane is a chemical used in gasoline, soil fumigants, fire extinguishers, flue gases and mechanical gauge fluid. Excessive exposure to this chemical can cause serious symptoms. Some people can suffer an adverse reaction to the chemical. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Acetylene Tetrabromide: Acetylene Tetrabromide is a chemical used mainly in mineral separation and as a solvent. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Acrinathrin: Acrinathrin is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide. The chemical is toxic to the nerve system. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Aluminum: Aluminum is a chemical used mainly for metallurgical purposes and can be found in packaging, electrical parts, vehicles, cooking utensils, construction materials and building components. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Amitrole: Amitrole is a herbicide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Azinphos-methyl: Azinphos-methyl is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Barthrin: Barthrin is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide. The chemical is toxic to the nerve system. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Beta-cyfluthrin: Beta-cyfluthrin is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide. The chemical is toxic to the nerve system. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Bifenthrin: Bifenthrin is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is toxic to the nerve system. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Bioallethrin: Bioallethrin is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide. The chemical is toxic to the nerve system. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Bioehtanomethrin: Bioehtanomethrin is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide. The chemical is toxic to the nerve system. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Biopermethrin: Biopermethrin is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Bioresmethrin: Bioresmethrin is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Chlorinated naphthalene: Chlorinated naphthalene is a chemical used in a wide range of applications: plasticizers, rubber industries, manufacture of electrical equipment and the petroleum industry. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Chlorodiphenyl: Chlorodiphenyl is a chemical used mainly in electrical cables and wires, electric condensers, lubricants and foundry coating and in the manufacture of paper, resins, rubbers, textiles, wood preservatives, electrical components, lacquers, herbicides and plasticizers. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Cismethrin: Cismethrin is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Cyclethrin: Cyclethrin is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide. The chemical is toxic to the nerve system. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Cyfluthrin: Cyfluthrin is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide. The chemical is toxic to the nerve system. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Cyhalothrin: Cyhalothrin is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide. The chemical is toxic to the nerve system. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Cyllprothrin: Cyllprothrin is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide. The chemical is toxic to the nerve system. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Cyphenothrin: Cyphenothrin is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Deltamethrin: Deltamethrin is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Dichlorphenamide: Dichlorphenamide is a chemical used mainly as a treatment for glaucoma. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Dimefluthrin: Dimefluthrin is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Dimethrin: Dimethrin is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Empenthrin: Empenthrin is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Esfenvalerate: Esfenvalerate is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Ether: Ether is a chemical used mainly as an anesthetic and industrial solvent. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Fenfluthrin: Fenfluthrin is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Fenpirithrin: Fenpirithrin is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Fenpropathrin: Fenpropathrin is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide and acarcide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Fenvalerate: Fenvalerate is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide and acaricide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Flucythrinate: Flucythrinate is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide and acaricide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Flufenprox: Flufenprox is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Fluoridated toothpaste: Fluoridated toothpaste contains fluoride and various other chemicals which can cause serious symptoms if sufficient quantities are swallowed. As little as half a tube of children's paste can cause death in a 2 year old child and a whole tube can cause death in a 9 year old child. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Fluvalinate: Fluvalinate is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide and acaricide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Furethrin: Furethrin is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Glaze: Glazes are used to put a shiny finish on various surfaces such as pottery. Glazes contain chemicals such as lead and zinc oxide which can cause serious symptoms if sufficient quantities are eaten. The chemicals cause damage to the gastrointestinal lining and the damage may continue for weeks after the poison was ingested. Death can result in severe cases. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Glyphosate: Glyphosate is a chemical used mainly in herbicides. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Halfenprox: Halfenprox is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide and acaricide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Hexabromobiphenyl: Hexabromobiphenyl is a chemical used mainly in fire retardant in thermoplastics found in such things as electrical equipment, car upholstery and motor housing.. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Imiprothrin: Imiprothrin is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Methyl Bromide: Methyl Bromide is a chemical used mainly in insecticides, fire extinguishers, wool degreasers and oil extraction. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Metofluthrin: Metofluthrin is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Molybdenum: Molybdenum is a chemical used mainly in steel alloys lubricants. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Oil-based paint: Oil-based paint contains various chemicals which can cause serious symptoms if sufficient quantities are swallowed or if other types of exposure occurs. These paint contain toxic hydrocarbons as well as various other heavy metals depending on the type of paint. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Pepper Spray: Pepper Spray is a chemical used mainly in riot control. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Phenol: Phenol is a chemical used mainly in the production of fertilizer, explosives, rubber, paint, paint remover, perfumes, asbestos products, wood preservatives, resins, textiles, pharmaceuticals and drugs. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Phthalthrin: Phthalthrin is an insecticide - it is used mainly for indoor purposes. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. Generally, large amounts need to be involved to cause serious symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Pine Oil: Pine Oil is a chemical used mainly as a disinfectant or cleaning agent. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Prallethrin: Prallethrin is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Profluthrin: Profluthrin is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Protrifenbute: Protrifenbute is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Pyresmethrin: Pyresmethrin is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Pyrethroid: Pyrethroid is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide. The chemical is toxic to the nerve system. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Silafluofen: Silafluofen is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Solder: Solder contains various chemicals and heavy metals which can cause serious symptoms if sufficient quantities are swallowed. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Tau-Fluvalinate: Tau-Fluvalinate is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide and acaricide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Tefluthrin: Tefluthrin is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Tetramethrin: Tetramethrin is an insecticide - it is used mainly for indoor purposes. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. Generally, large amounts need to be involved to cause serious symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Tralomethrin: Tralomethrin is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Transfluthrin: Transfluthrin is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Transpermethrin: Transpermethrin is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- White Phosphorus: White Phosphorus is a chemical used mainly in fertilizers, water treatment, rodenticides and insecticides (for cockroaches). Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- alpha-Cypermethrin: alpha-Cypermethrin is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is toxic to the nerve system. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- beta-Cypermethrin: Beta-Cypermethrin is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide. The chemical is toxic to the nerve system. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- gamma-Cyhalothrin: Gamma-Cyhalothrin is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide. The chemical is toxic to the nerve system. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- lambda-Cyhalothrin: lambda-Cyhalothrin is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide. The chemical is toxic to the nerve system. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- theta-Cypermethrin: theta -Cypermethrin is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide. The chemical is toxic to the nerve system. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- zeta-Cypermethrin: zeta-Cypermethrin is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chewing difficulty: Chewing difficulty is a condition in which a person struggles or is unable to chew normally.
  • Chiari Malformation: Protrusion of the brain down the spinal column.
  • Chilaiditi syndrome: A rare disorder where a part of the colon, or sometimes intestine, is abnormally positioned between the liver and the diaphragm. The defect may occur in people who have chronic lung disease or abdominal ascites but may also occur in healthy individuals without causing symptoms.
  • Child abuse: Physical, sexual, emotional abuse or neglect of child.
  • Childhood liver cancer, primary: Cancer that develops in the tissue of the liver in children.
  • Chloramphenicol-induced Sideroblastic anemia: Chloramphenicol-induced sideroblastic anemia is a blood disorder caused by taking a drug called chloramphenicol. The body has sufficient iron levels but is unable to utilise it properly in red blood cells. The iron becomes abnormally deposited in red blood cells which make them unable to function properly.
  • Cholangitis: bile duct inflammation (cholangitis)
  • Cholecystitis: inflammation of the gall bladder.
  • Cholestasis -- pigmentary retinopathy -- cleft palate: A rare syndrome characterized by degeneration of retinal pigments, cleft lip, cleft palate, kidney problems and cholestasis (bile flow obstruction).
  • Cholestasis disease of pregnancy: A liver condition that can occur usually in the last stage of pregnancy. The flow of bile in the gallbladder or liver is impaired by the high levels of pregnancy hormones. The bile acids build up in the organs and then enter the bloodstream. The main symptom is usually itching. Symptoms usually resolve after delivering the baby. Risk factors includes existing liver condition, multiple pregnancy and a family history of the condition.
  • Chordoma: Chordomas are tumors originating from embryonic remnants of the primitive notochord
  • Choroid Plexus neoplasms: A rare type of brain tumor that originates in the choroids plexus. The choroids plexus is located inside a space in the brain called the ventricles and produces cerebrospinal fluid. Symptoms are determined by the size, type and exact location of the tumor.
  • Chromosome 1, 1p36 deletion syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder where deletion of a portion of chromosome 1 causes various abnormalities such as heart problems, mental retardation, developmental delay, facial dysmorphism and short stature. The symptoms are variable depending on the exact location of chromosomal deletion.
  • Chromosome 1, uniparental disomy 1q12 q21: A rare chromosomal disorder where part or all of the short arm (p) of chromosome 1 is deleted resulting in various abnormalities which are determined by the size of the deleted portion.
  • Chromosome 10, Monosomy 10p:
  • Chromosome 10p deletion syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder where there is a deletion of the short arm (p) of chromosome 10 resulting in variable abnormalities.
  • Chromosome 10p duplication/10q deletion syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder where a section of the short arm (p) of chromosome 10 is duplicated and a section of the long arm (q) of chromosome 10 is deleted resulting in various abnormalities.
  • Chromosome 12, 12p trisomy: A rare chromosomal disorder where there are three copies of the short arm (p) of chromosome 12 rather than the normal two resulting in various abnormalities. The type and severity of symptoms depend on the amount and location of genetic material deleted.
  • Chromosome 12p duplication syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder where there are three copies of the short arm (p) of chromosome 12 rather than the normal two resulting in various abnormalities. The type and severity of symptoms depend on the amount and location of genetic material deleted.
  • Chromosome 14q, proximal duplication: A rare chromosomal disorder where duplication of a portion of chromosome 14 causes various abnormalities such as facial dysmorphism, limb abnormalities, mental retardation and short stature.
  • Chromosome 15q triplication syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder where there are three copies of a part of the long arm of chromosome 15 resulting in various anomalies.
  • Chromosome 16q, partial deletion: A rare chromosomal disorder involving deletion of genetic material from the long arm of chromosome 17. The type and severity of symptoms are determined by the amount and location of the lost genetic material.
  • Chromosome 17, deletion 17q23 q24: A rare chromosomal disorder involving deletion of genetic material from the long arm of chromosome 17. The type and severity of symptoms are determined by the amount and location of the lost genetic material.
  • Chromosome 18, Tetrasomy 18p: A rare chromosomal disorder where there are four copies of short arm of chromosome 18 instead of the normal two which results in various genital, kidney, digital, head and face abnormalities.
  • Chromosome 18, trisomy 18q: A rare chromosomal disorder involving an extra copy of genetic material from the long arm of chromosome 18. The type and severity of symptoms are determined by the amount and location of the duplicated genetic material.
  • Chromosome 19q, partial duplication: A rare chromosomal disorder where the long arm of chromosome is triplicated. The type and severity of symptoms is determined by the size of the duplicated genetic portion.
  • Chromosome 19q13.11 Deletion syndrome: A rare genetic syndrome involving features such as poor fetal growth, reduced fetal activity, developmental problems and various other physical symptoms.
  • Chromosome 1p deletion syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder where part or all of the short arm (p) of chromosome 1 is deleted resulting in various abnormalities which are determined by the size of the deleted portion.
  • Chromosome 21, tetrasomy 21q: A rare chromosomal disorder where there is four copies of the long arm of chromosome 21 instead of the normal two which results in various physical and mental anomalies.
  • Chromosome 22 Ring: A rare chromosomal disorder where genetic material from one or both ends of chromosome 22 is missing and the two broken ends have rejoined to form a ring. The resulting type and severity of symptoms is determined by the amount and location of genetic material missing.
  • Chromosome 22 trisomy mosaic: A rare chromosomal disorder where three copies of chromosome 22 are present in some of the body's cells instead of the normal two. Severity of symptoms is determined by how many cells have the extra chromosomal material.

Conditions listing medical symptoms: Eating symptoms:

The following list of conditions have 'Eating symptoms' or similar listed as a symptom in our database. This computer-generated list may be inaccurate or incomplete. Always seek prompt professional medical advice about the cause of any symptom.

Select from the following alphabetical view of conditions which include a symptom of Eating symptoms or choose View All.

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Conditions listing medical complications: Eating symptoms:

The following list of medical conditions have 'Eating symptoms' or similar listed as a medical complication in our database.

 

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