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Symptoms » Enlarged lymph nodes » Glossary
 

Glossary for Enlarged lymph nodes

Medical terms related to Enlarged lymph nodes or mentioned in this section include:

  • AIDS-Related Complex: Patients with only mild symptoms of HIV infections.
  • Acanthocytosis: A rare disorder where most of the red blood cells are abnormal with spiny projections due to lipid abnormalities. The blood abnormality is seen in conditions such as abetalipoproteinemia, severe liver disease and severe malnutrition. Symptoms and prognosis depend on the underlying disorder.
  • Acute adult T-Cell leukemia: A form of blood cancer affecting the T-cells which make up the body's immune system. The disease is caused by the HTLV-1 virus (human T-cell leukemia virus) which causes the proliferation of abnormal T-cells. The virus can be transmitted sexually and may lay dormant for decades. There are four subtypes: acute, chronic, lymphoma and smoldering. The acute and lymphoma subtypes have the poorest prognosis. The acute subtype tends to progress rapidly and is the most prevalent form of the condition.
  • Acute basophilic leukaemia: A rare type of acute myeloid leukemia characterized by the presence of abnormal basophils.
  • Acute cholinergic dysautonomia: A rare condition characterized by the presence of abnormal red blood cells in the bone marrow and blood. The condition is characterized by anemia and generally leads to the development of acute myelogenous leukemia. The acute form has more severe symptoms than the chronic form.
  • Acute erythroleukemia: A rare condition characterized by the presence of abnormal blood cells (erythroblastic precursors) in the bone marrow and blood. The condition is characterized by anemia and generally leads to the development of acute myelogenous leukemia. The acute form has more severe symptoms than the chronic form.
  • Acute lymphoblastic leukemia: A malignant disease that starts suddenly and progresses quickly. It is characterized by a high number of immature cells in the organs, bone marrow and blood. Symptoms include fever, pallor, anorexia, fatigue, anemia, hemorrhage, bone pain, splenomegaly and frequent infections. Also called acute lymphocytic leukemia.
  • Acute lymphoblastic leukemia, Susceptibility to: Cancer of the white blood cells characterized by the presence of excessive lymphoblasts. Precursors to white blood cells are called blasts and are made by the bone marrow but in ALL the blasts are abnormal and do not develop into lymphocytes. Instead, the abnormal blasts or leukemic cells multiply rapidly and reduce the level of other types of blood cells such as red blood cells and platelets. There are two subtypes of leukemia linked to a genetic anomaly which increases a person's susceptibility to developing the cancer. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome 10q21 and type 2 is linked to a defect on chromosome 7p12.2.
  • Acute lymphoblastic leukemia, Susceptibility to, 1: Cancer of the white blood cells characterized by the presence of excessive lymphoblasts. Precursors to white blood cells are called blasts and are made by the bone marrow but in ALL the blasts are abnormal and do not develop into lymphocytes. Instead, the abnormal blasts or leukemic cells multiply rapidly and reduce the level of other types of blood cells such as red blood cells and platelets. There are two subtypes of leukemia linked to a genetic anomaly which increases a person's susceptibility to developing the cancer. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome 10q21.
  • Acute lymphoblastic leukemia, Susceptibility to, 2: Cancer of the white blood cells characterized by the presence of excessive lymphoblasts. Precursors to white blood cells are called blasts and are made by the bone marrow but in ALL the blasts are abnormal and do not develop into lymphocytes. Instead, the abnormal blasts or leukemic cells multiply rapidly and reduce the level of other types of blood cells such as red blood cells and platelets. There are two subtypes of leukemia linked to a genetic anomaly which increases a person's susceptibility to developing the cancer. Type 2 is linked to a defect on chromosome 7p12.2.
  • Acute lymphoblastic leukemia, adult: Cancer of the white blood cells. Precursors to white blood cells are called blasts and are made by the bone marrow but in ALL the blasts are abnormal and do not develop into lymphocytes. Instead, the abnormal blasts or leukemic cells multiply rapidly and reduce the level of other types of blood cells such as red blood cells and platelets.
  • Adult T-Cell leukemia: A form of blood cancer affecting the T-cells which make up the body's immune system. The disease is caused by the HTLV-1 virus (human T-cell leukemia virus) which causes the proliferation of abnormal T-cells. The virus can be transmitted sexually and may lay dormant for decades. There are four subtypes: acute, chronic, lymphoma and smoldering. The acute and lymphoma subtypes have the poorest prognosis.
  • Adult T-Cell lymphoma: A form of blood cancer affecting the T-cells which make up the body's immune system. The disease is caused by the HTLV-1 virus (human T-cell leukemia virus) which causes the proliferation of abnormal T-cells. The virus can be transmitted sexually and may lay dormant for decades. There are four subtypes: acute, chronic, lymphoma and smoldering. The acute and lymphoma subtypes have the poorest prognosis. The lymphoma subtype is aggressive and tends to affect the lymph nodes more than the blood.
  • Aggressive NK-cell leukaemia: An aggressive form of blood cancer involving the rapid proliferation of natural killer (NK) cells.
  • Aggressive systemic mastocytosis: The excessive proliferation of mast cells. Mast cells control the skin's response to minor injury and release a chemical called histamine which causes the skin to redden. In the aggressive form, mast cells accumulate in the liver, spleen and lymphatic system.
  • Amyloidosis, inflammatory: Amyloidosis is a rare group of metabolic disorders where a protein called amyloid accumulates in body organs and tissues where it can cause damage and is potentially fatal. Symptoms depend on the organs involved. Secondary amyloidosis is caused by a chronic infection of inflammatory conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, multiple myeloma, tuberculosis and osteomyelitis. The main organs affected in secondary amyloidosis are usually the kidneys, liver, spleen and lymph nodes. The peripheral and autonomic nerves and the heart are rarely affected.
  • Angiofollicular lymph hyperplasia: A rare disorder of the lymph system characterized by the development of benign tumors in lymph tissue anywhere in the body.
  • Angiosarcoma: A rare, aggressive malignant tumor of the blood vessel cells. Also called hemangiosarcoma, malignant hemangioendothelioma.
  • Anthrax: A serious infectious bacterial disease that can be fatal.
  • Arachnidism: Poisoning from a spider bite.
  • Asrar-Facharzt-Haque syndrome: A form of sinus histiocytosis characterized by lymphadenopathy as well as involvement of other tissues such as the sinus cavity, skin, lungs, bone, eyes, kidneys, testes, head and neck area and the central nervous system. Symptoms vary according to the organ involved. The condition usually runs a prolonged course with spontaneous remission occurring in some cases. Rare cases may be fatal.
  • Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome: An inherited autoimmune condition characterized by proliferation of lymphocytes and autoimmunity against the body's own blood cells resulting in premature death of certain blood cells.
  • Bacterial diseases: Diseases caused by a bacterial infection
  • Bartonella infections: Infection with bacteria from the Bartonella genus of bacteria. Specific bacteria from within this group are Bartonella bacilliforms (Oroya fever), Bartonella Heneslae (Cat-scratch disease). Other conditions caused by this bacteria are endocarditis, bacteremia and angiomatosis. Symptoms vary depending on the type of bacteria involved and the severity of the infection - immunocompromised patients face greater risk of severe infection.
  • Bullis fever syndrome: A disease transmitted through tick bites (Ambylomma americanum). Symptoms include fever, rash and headache. The disease was first observed in soldiers training at Camp Bullis in America.
  • Cancer: Abnormal overgrowth of body cells.
  • Cat scratch disease: An infectious disease transmitted through a cat's bite, scratch or lick and resulting primarily in lymph node pain and swelling. The condition can be mild or severe.
  • Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Susceptibility to: A cancer of the blood and bone marrow where too many abnormal lymphocytes (white blood cells) are produced which eventually crowds out healthy blood cells in the body. Researchers have discovered a link between a number of genetic defects and increased susceptibility to chronic lymphocytic leukemia.
  • Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Susceptibility to, 1: A cancer of the blood and bone marrow where too many abnormal lymphocytes (white blood cells) are produced which eventually crowds out healthy blood cells in the body. Researchers have discovered a link between a number of genetic defects and increased susceptibility to chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome 11q13.3
  • Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Susceptibility to, 2: A cancer of the blood and bone marrow where too many abnormal lymphocytes (white blood cells) are produced which eventually crowds out healthy blood cells in the body. Researchers have discovered a link between a number of genetic defects and increased susceptibility to chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Type 2 is linked to a defect on chromosome 13q14.
  • Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Susceptibility to, 3: A cancer of the blood and bone marrow where too many abnormal lymphocytes (white blood cells) are produced which eventually crowds out healthy blood cells in the body. Researchers have discovered a link between a number of genetic defects and increased susceptibility to chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Type 3 is linked to a defect on chromosome 9q34.1.
  • Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Susceptibility to, 4: A cancer of the blood and bone marrow where too many abnormal lymphocytes (white blood cells) are produced which eventually crowds out healthy blood cells in the body. Researchers have discovered a link between a number of genetic defects and increased susceptibility to chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Type 4 is linked to a defect on chromosome 6p25.
  • Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Susceptibility to, 5: A cancer of the blood and bone marrow where too many abnormal lymphocytes (white blood cells) are produced which eventually crowds out healthy blood cells in the body. Researchers have discovered a link between a number of genetic defects and increased susceptibility to chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Type 5 is linked to a defect on chromosome 11q24.1.
  • Chronic Myeloproliferative Disease, Unclassified: A form of blood disorder characterized by the abnormal proliferation of myeloid precursors in the bone marrow. This category refers to cases of myeloproliferative disease which don't fit into any of the other specific type of myelproliferative diseases.
  • Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia: A rare form of leukemia characterized by excessive levels of mature neutrophils.
  • Chronic adult T-Cell leukemia: A form of blood cancer affecting the T-cells which make up the body's immune system. The disease is caused by the HTLV-1 virus (human T-cell leukemia virus) which causes the proliferation of abnormal T-cells. The virus can be transmitted sexually and may lay dormant for decades. There are four subtypes: acute, chronic, lymphoma and smoldering. The acute and lymphoma subtypes have the poorest prognosis. The acute form tends to progress relatively slowly and generally responds better to treatment than the other subtypes.
  • Chronic leukemia: Leukemia in which the cell line is well differentiated, usually B lymphocytes.
  • Chronic lymphocytic leukemia: A cancer of the blood and bone marrow where too many abnormal lymphocytes (white blood cells) are produced which eventually crowds out healthy blood cells in the body.
  • Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma: A malignancy of the T-cells which make up part of the body's immune system. The cancer is characterized by the excessive proliferation of T-cells which are a type of white blood cell. The degree of skin involvement is variable.
  • Cutaneous lymphoma: Cutaneous lymphoma is a term used to describe a group of lymphoproliferative disorders characterized by localization of neoplastic T lymphocytes to the skin.
  • Cytomegalovirus: A easily transmissible viral infection that is common but generally causes no symptoms except in infants and people with weakened immune systems.
  • De Vaal syndrome: A rare condition characterized by the defective development of T-cells, B-cells, thrombocytes and granulocytes. Severe immunodeficiency results which leads to infant death unless a bone marrow transplant is performed.
  • Di Guglielmo I -- acute: A rare condition characterized by the presence of abnormal red blood cells in the bone marrow and blood. The condition is characterized by anemia and generally leads to the development of acute myelogenous leukemia. The acute form has more severe symptoms than the chronic form.
  • Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma: A common form of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma characterized by abnormal proliferation of B-lymphocytes. It is a cancer of the B-lymphocytes (a type of white blood cell) which, if untreated, can spread to other parts of the body such as the bones and the liver. It differs from follicular lymphoma in that it is a high-grade lymphoma that usually develops rapidly. Follicular lymphoma often transforms into diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.
  • Edema: The abnormal retention of fluid in a given anatomical area
  • Epstein-Barr virus: Common virus causing mononucleosis
  • Fire Coral poisoning: The Fire Coral is a type of jellyfish with a seaweed-like appearance, found in warmer oceans around the world. The fire coral has stinging cells which can deliver a sting to humans. The fire coral has a hard skeletal portion which can also deliver cuts to the skin if it is brushed up against.
  • Follicular Lymphoma, Susceptibility to, 1: Follicular lymphoma is a form of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma characterized by an abnormal proliferation of B-lymphocytes. It is a cancer of the B-lymphocytes (a type of white blood cell) which, if untreated, can spread to other parts of the body such as the bones and the liver. It differs from diffuse large B-cell lymphoma in that it is a low-grade lymphoma that usually develops slowly. Follicular lymphoma often transforms into diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Susceptibility type 1 means that a genetic defect on chromosome 6p21.33 makes a person more susceptible to developing follicular lymphoma.
  • Gila Lizard poisoning: Gila lizards are one of the few venomous species of lizard. They are found in parts of America such as Arizona, California, Nevada and Mexico. Envenomation by lizards is very uncommon but these venomous lizards can cause life-threatening symptoms. Gila lizards tend to hold on with their jaws while biting and the longer the jaws remain attached to the skin, the more severe the poisoning may be.
  • HIV like lymphadenopathy: Painless lymphadenopathy.
  • HIV/AIDS: HIV is a sexually transmitted virus and AIDS is the progressive immune failure that HIV causes.
  • Heavy-chain diseases: A group of rare condition characterized by the production of the heavy chain portions of immunoglobulin molecules. Subtypes include y-chain disease, µ-chain disease and α-chain disease.
  • Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis: A condition which is characterized by an abnormal appearance of histiocytes in the blood
  • Hodgkin's Disease: A form of cancer that affects the lymphatic system.
  • Hyper IgM syndrome 1: Hyper IgM syndrome is a rare inherited immunodeficiency disorder which causes frequent infections involving the ears, eyes, sinuses, lungs, skin, respiratory tract and other areas of the body. Type 1 is caused by a defect on chromosome Xq26 and tends to affects males mostly.
  • Hyper IgM syndrome 3: Hyper IgM syndrome is a rare inherited immunodeficiency disorder which causes frequent infections involving the ears, eyes, sinuses, lungs, skin, respiratory tract and other areas of the body. Type 3 is caused by a defect on chromosome 20q12-q13.2.
  • Hyper-IgM Syndrome: A rare inherited immunodeficiency disorder which causes frequent infections involving the ears, eyes, sinuses, lungs, skin, respiratory tract and other areas of the body.
  • Hypergammaglobulinemia: An increase in the level of any of a number of gamma globulins. This can result from conditions such as chronic bacterial infections, multiple myeloma, lymphomas, dysproteinemias, liver disease and chronic granulomatous inflammations. The exact symptoms depend on the type of gamma globulins involved and the severity of the condition.
  • Immune Dysfunction with T-Cell Inactivation due to Calcium Entry Defect 1: A rare condition where a genetic anomaly affects the movement of calcium through the body and results in immune system problems. Defect 1 is linked to a defect in the ORAI1 gene on chromosome 12q24. The condition was reported in two siblings.
  • Immune Dysfunction with T-Cell Inactivation due to Calcium Entry Defect 2: A rare condition where a genetic anomaly affects the movement of calcium through the body and results in immune system problems. Defect 1 is linked to a defect in the STIM1 gene on chromosome 11p15.5 The condition was reported in four siblings.
  • Infection: Infections as a symptom.
  • Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia: A rare form of malignant bone marrow cancer that occurs in children and involves the proliferation of immature precursors of certain blood cells - myelocytes and monocytes. The proliferation is slower than in acute forms of the disease.
  • Kikuchi disease: A rare lymph node disorder which is not cancerous but causes large, inflamed lymph nodes.
  • Kikuchi-Fujimoto Disease:
  • Letterer-Siwe disease: A rare usually fatal condition characterized by skin lesions, bleeding tendency, enlarged liver and spleen, enlarged lymph nodes and progressive anemia. The condition is caused by excessive proliferation of histiocytes.
  • Leukemia, B-cell, chronic: A slow growing cancer of the immune system involving proliferation of B-cells.
  • Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Acute, L1: Acute lymphocytic leukemia is a cancer of the white blood cells. Precursors to white blood cells are called blasts and are made by the bone marrow but in ALL the blasts are abnormal and do not develop into lymphocytes. Instead, the abnormal blasts or leukemic cells multiply rapidly and reduce the level of other types of blood cells such as red blood cells and platelets. There are three main subtypes (L1, L2 and L3) which are differentiated by the appearance of the cancerous cells: L1 is characterized by small, uniform cancer cells with a round nucleus and very little cytoplasm. L1 has a better prognosis than L2. L1 is the main form in children (about 85%) but is less common in adults (about 30%).
  • Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Acute, L2: Acute lymphocytic leukemia is a cancer of the white blood cells. Precursors to white blood cells are called blasts and are made by the bone marrow but in ALL the blasts are abnormal and do not develop into lymphocytes. Instead, the abnormal blasts or leukemic cells multiply rapidly and reduce the level of other types of blood cells such as red blood cells and platelets. There are three main subtypes (L1, L2 and L3) which are differentiated by the appearance of the cancerous cells: L2 is characterized by larger cells, an irregular-shaped nucleus, more cytoplasm and significant variation between cells. L2 has a poorer prognosis than L1. L2 is the main form in adults (about 65%) but is less common in children (about 15%).
  • Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Acute, L3: Acute lymphocytic leukemia is a relatively aggressive cancer of the white blood cells. Precursors to white blood cells are called blasts and are made by the bone marrow but in ALL the blasts are abnormal and do not develop into lymphocytes. Instead, the abnormal blasts or leukemic cells multiply rapidly and reduce the level of other types of blood cells such as red blood cells and platelets. There are three main subtypes (L1, L2 and L3) which are differentiated by the appearance of the cancerous cells. L3 is quite uncommon but is very similar to Burkitt's lymphoma - in fact, they may be considered the same disease with different manifestations.
  • Leukemia, Myeloid, Philadelphia-Negative: Acute lymphocytic leukemia is a relatively aggressive cancer of the white blood cells. Precursors to white blood cells are called blasts and are made by the bone marrow but in ALL the blasts are abnormal and do not develop into lymphocytes. Instead, the abnormal blasts or leukemic cells multiply rapidly and reduce the level of other types of blood cells such as red blood cells and platelets. The Philadelphia negative form of the condition is not associated with a genetic mutation. It is distinguished from the positive form by the clinical course which is initially the same but progresses to eventual bone marrow failure without a distinct increase in blast cells. Other differences include poor response to chemotherapy, lower white blood cell counts, greater monocytosis, less basophilia, lower bone marrow myeloid to erythroid ratio and increased likelihood of developing thrombocytopenia. Philadelphia negative patients also tend to be older and median survival rates tend to be poorer.
  • Leukemia, Myeloid, Philadelphia-Positive: A relatively aggressive cancer of the cells that produce white blood cells. The Philadelphia form of myeloid leukemia carries a relatively poor prognosis. It involves an acquired genetic mutation which results in the production tyrosine kinase which causes too many abnormal white blood cells to be produced which results in a shortage of other blood cell types. Treatment is aimed at inhibiting the production of tyrosine kinase.
  • Leukemia, T-cell, chronic: Cancer of blood cells called T-cells which form part of the immune system.
  • Leukemia, mast-cell: A very aggressive form of leukemia - a subtype of acute myeloid leukemia. The cancer can in rare cases develop from chronic myeloid leukemia or systemic mastocytosis but generally develops on its own.
  • Listeriosis: Bacterial food poisoning
  • Lizard poisoning: A few lizard species are venomous e.g. Gila monster and Mexican beaded lizard. Envenomation by lizards is very uncommon but these venomous lizards can cause life-threatening symptoms. Gila lizards tend to hold on with their jaws while biting and the longer the jaws remain attached to the skin, the more severe the poisoning may be.
  • Lymph node neoplasm: Lymph node tumor.
  • Lymph symptoms: Symptoms affecting the lymphatic system or lymph nodes
  • Lymphadenopathy, angioimmunoblastic with dysproteinemia: A progressive immune system disorder that usually affects people over the age of 50 and is characterized by chills, sweating, weight loss, skin rashes.
  • Lymphedema: Swelling of a region due to obstruction of lymphatic vessels
  • Lymphoblastic lymphoma: A cancer of the lymph system which usually involves immature T-lymphocytes and sometimes B-lymphocytes. The cancer usually affects the mediastinum (between the lungs), bone marrow, brain and spinal cord.
  • Lymphocytic leukemia: A condition characterized by the proliferation of lymphoid tissues
  • Lymphoid interstitial pneumonia: A relatively rare form of lung disease characterized by the buildup of lymphocytes (a type of white blood cell) in the air spaces or alveoli of the lungs. The condition can affect children or adults and is frequently associated with conditions such as HIV and autoimmune conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis and Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Symptoms may develop gradually over a period of months or even years in some cases.
  • Lymphoma: Any neoplastic disorder that occurs in lymphoid tissue
  • Lymphoma, Large-Cell, Follicular: A cancer of cells in the immune system. The cancer is comprised of large cells and tends to be aggressive and metastasizes readily.
  • Lymphoma, large-cell: A cancer of cells in the immune system. The cancer is comprised of large cells and tends to be aggressive and metastasizes readily.
  • Lymphoma, large-cell, immunoblastic: A cancer of the immune system characterized by the presence of immunoblasts. Immunoblasts are T cells which have been transformed due to stimulation by an antigen.
  • Lymphoma, small cleaved-cell, diffuse: A slow-growing cancer of the lymph system that involves small cells. The diffuse form has no distinguishable pattern of progression through the lymph node.
  • Lymphoma, small cleaved-cell, follicular: A slow-growing cancer of the lymph system consisting of small cells that can circulate readily in the blood. The cancer occurs in a follicular pattern. Despite it's ability to spread, the cancer tends to be less aggressive than the large cell variety.
  • Lymphoproliferative Syndrome, X-Linked, 1: A rare inherited immunodeficiency disorder where the body's immune systm is unable to respond appropriately to certain viral infections (Epstein Barr virus). The immune system becomes weakened following and EBV infection. As the condition in inherited in a X-linked manner, males tend to suffer the full extent of the disease which tends to be eventually fatal in most cases. Female carriers tend not to develop and problems following an EBV infection. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome Xq25.@
  • Lymphoproliferative Syndrome, X-Linked, 2: A rare inherited immunodeficiency disorder where the body's immune systm is unable to respond appropriately to certain viral infections (Epstein Barr virus). The immune system becomes weakened following and EBV infection. As the condition in inherited in a X-linked manner, males tend to suffer the full extent of the disease which tends to be eventually fatal in most cases. Female carriers tend not to develop and problems following an EBV infection. Type 2 is linked to a defect in the XIAP gene on chromosome Xq25.
  • Lymphoproliferative disorders: A group of conditions characterized the by excessive production of lymphocytes (white blood cells). Immunosuppressed individuals are the most population group to develop this condition. The manifestations will vary depending on the particular subtype involved.
  • Lymphoproliferative syndrome, EBV-Associated, Autosomal, 1: A rare inherited immunodeficiency disorder where the body's immune systm is unable to respond appropriately to certain viral infections (Epstein Barr virus). Infection with the virus can lead to chronic immune problems which can ultimately result in death. Type 1 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 5q32.
  • Mansonella streptocerca infection: A parasitic nematode infection which occurs in West Africa and can be transmitted by mosquito bites. The adult worms tend to live in the skin and cause symptoms.
  • Melanoma: Melanoma is the most dangerous type of skin cancer. It is the leading cause of death from skin disease. It involves cells called melanocytes, which produce a skin pigment called melanin. Melanin is responsible for skin and hair color.
  • Mexican Beaded Lizard poisoning: Gila lizards are one of the few venomous species of lizard. They are found in parts of America such as Arizona, California, Nevada and Mexico. Envenomation by lizards is very uncommon but these venomous lizards can cause life-threatening symptoms. Gila lizards tend to hold on with their jaws while biting and the longer the jaws remain attached to the skin, the more severe the poisoning may be.
  • Mononucleosis: Common infectious virus.
  • Multicentric reticulohistiocytosis: A rare condition characterized by the proliferation of histiocytes (immune cells) which causes destructive arthritis and skin nodules.
  • Mycobacterium kansasii: A form of mycobacterium
  • Mycobacterium scrofulaceum: A form of mycobacterium
  • Myeloproliferative disease:
  • Nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma: An uncommon form of Hodgkin lymphoma (an immune system cancer) characterized by the presence of nodular lymphocytes representing a nodular growth pattern of the cancer.
  • Occupational Cancer -- Pharynx cancer: Occupational exposure to mustard gas can increase the risk of developing Pharynx cancer.
  • POEMS: A very rare disorder that has widespread effects on the body: P -- polyneuropathy, O -- organopathy, E -- endocrinopathy, M -- monoclonal gammopathy and S -- skin changes.
  • POEMS syndrome: A very rare disorder that has widespread effects on the body: P - polyneuropathy, O - organopathy, E - endocrinopathy, M - monoclonal gammopathy, S - skin changes.
  • Painless lymphadenopathy as seen in tuberculosis: Enlarged lymph nodes are a common symptom in a number of infectious and malignant diseases. It is a recognized symptom of many diseases.
  • Pancoast's syndrome: weakness and pain in the shoulder, arm and hand, caused by pressure on the nerves
  • Parathyroid Cancer: A condition that is characterised by malignancy that affects the parathyroid
  • Pelvic Cancer: Any malignancy that is located in the anatomical location of the pelvis
  • Pelvis conditions: Any condition that affects the pelvis
  • Penis conditions: Any condition that affects the penis
  • Penis symptoms: Various symptoms affecting the male penis
  • Pharynx cancer: A condition that is characterised by a malignant lesion located in the pharynx
  • Pinta: A tropical American skin disease that only affects dark-skinned races. It is caused by an organism the causes thickening and loss of pigmentation of the skin.
  • Plague: Any epidemic disease with a high death rate.
  • Polyarthritis, systemic: A chronic inflammatory disease (usually autoimmune) that causes inflammation in multiple parts of the body and causes arthritis in five or more joints.
  • Possible human carcinogenic exposure -- Phenytoin: Some evidence indicates that exposure to Phenytoin (an anticonvulsant medication) has a possible link to an increased risk of developing cancer in humans. The carcinogenicity of the substance may be influenced by the duration and level of exposure.
  • Postperfusion syndrome: A complication that can occasionally occur following blood transfusion. The condition is believed to be caused by Ebstein-Barr virus or cytomegalovirus present in the transfused blood.
  • Primary malignant lymphoma: The excessive proliferation of lymphocytes which forms part of the immune system. Primary cancers refer to the fact that the cancer originated in the lymph cells rather than having metastasized.
  • Primary sclerosing cholangitis: Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is a chronic cholestatic liver disease of unknown etiology that is recognized increasingly in children.
  • Primidone -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Primidone during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Prolymphocytic leukemia: A very rare type of leukemia involving a proliferation of immature white blood cells (prolymphocytes - T-cells).
  • Rademacher disease: A disorder characterized by reduced immunity and enlarged lymph nodes.
  • Rosai-Dorfman disease: A rare condition characterized by excessive production and accumulation of a particular white blood cell (histiocyte). Accumulation primarily occurs in the lymph nodes, especially in the neck, but may also occur in the skin, central nervous system, digestive tract and kidneys.
  • Rubella: A contagious viral infection caused by the Rubella virus which produces a rash and lymph node swelling. It can have serious implication in pregnant women as the virus can be transmitted through the placenta and cause serious fetal defects or even fetal death.
  • Sarcoid: A fleshy tumor.
  • Sarcoidosis: Rare autoimmune disease usually affecting the lungs.
  • Schnitzler syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by the association of chronic urticaria as well as a blood abnormality called macroglobulinemia.
  • Severe combined immunodeficiency, atypical: A rare blood disorder where the body's immune system is not functioning properly due to a deficiency of certain T lymphocytes and other T lymphocytes which are unable to be utilized.
  • Sezary syndrome: A rare type of lymphoma characterized by skin redness, leukemia and enlarged lymph nodes.
  • Shaver's disease: A progressive lung disorder caused by exposure to aluminium oxide which is present in bauxite fumes. The condition involves inflammation and damage to the air sacs in the lungs.
  • Smoldering adult T-Cell leukemia: A form of blood cancer affecting the T-cells which make up the body's immune system. The disease is caused by the HTLV-1 virus (human T-cell leukemia virus) which causes the proliferation of abnormal T-cells. The virus can be transmitted sexually and may lay dormant for decades. There are four subtypes: acute, chronic, lymphoma and smoldering. The acute and lymphoma subtypes have the poorest prognosis. The smoldering form tends to progress even slower than the chronic form and responds the best to treatment.
  • Spleen neoplasm: A tumor that originates in the spleen.
  • Squamous Cell Skin Cancer: Aggressive skin cancer arising due to sun exposure; lesions are locally invasive to surrounding tissues and may metastasise
  • Still's Disease, Adult-Onset: A form of arthritic inflammation characterized by fever, rash and joint pain that occurs in adults. The cause is unknown.
  • Sulfone syndrome: A hypersensitivity reaction to sulfone which is a component of a drug called dapsone which is often used to treat skin conditions such as leprosy, vasculitis, dermatitis herpetiformis and Sweet disease. The reaction can result in death in some cases.
  • Swelling symptoms: Symptoms causing swelling or enlargement.
  • Swollen glands: Swelling of glands or lymph nodes
  • Swollen lymph nodes: Swelling or enlargement of the lymph nodes
  • Syphilis: A sexually transmitted disease caused by a bacteria (Treponema pallidum). The condition is often asymptomatic in the early stages but one or more sores may be present in the early stages. Untreated syphilis usually results in remission of visible symptoms but further severe damage may occur to internal organs and other body tissues which can result in death.
  • Systemic Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis: Onset of JRA with fevers and systemic symptoms
  • Systemic Lupus Erythematosus with Hemolytic Anemia, Susceptibility to, 1: Systemic Lupus Erythematosus is an autoimmune disease affecting mostly women and causing various effects throughout different parts of the body. Its severity can range from very mild to extremely serious depending on which body organs are afflicted. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility of developing SLE and hemolytic anemia - the anemia often occurs months or even years before symptoms of SLE develop. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome 11q14.
  • Systemic Lupus Erythematosus with Nephritis, Susceptibility to, 1: Systemic Lupus Erythematosus is an autoimmune disease affecting mostly women and causing various effects throughout different parts of the body. Its severity can range from very mild to extremely serious depending on which body organs are afflicted. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility of developing SLE and nephritis. More than half of SLE patients will develop nephritis. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome 10q22.3.
  • Systemic Lupus Erythematosus with Vitiligo, Susceptibility to, 1: Systemic Lupus Erythematosus is an autoimmune disease affecting mostly women and causing various effects throughout different parts of the body. Its severity can range from very mild to extremely serious depending on which body organs are afflicted. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility of developing SLE and vitiligo. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome 17p13.
  • Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, Susceptibility to, 1: Systemic Lupus Erythematosus is an autoimmune disease affecting mostly women and causing various effects throughout different parts of the body. Its severity can range from very mild to extremely serious depending on which body organs are afflicted. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility of developing SLE. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome 1q41.
  • Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, Susceptibility to, 10: Systemic Lupus Erythematosus is an autoimmune disease affecting mostly women and causing various effects throughout different parts of the body. Its severity can range from very mild to extremely serious depending on which body organs are afflicted. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility of developing SLE. Type 10 is linked to a defect on chromosome 7q32.
  • Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, Susceptibility to, 11: Systemic Lupus Erythematosus is an autoimmune disease affecting mostly women and causing various effects throughout different parts of the body. Its severity can range from very mild to extremely serious depending on which body organs are afflicted. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility of developing SLE. Type 11 is linked to a defect on chromosome 2q32.2-q32.3.
  • Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, Susceptibility to, 12: Systemic Lupus Erythematosus is an autoimmune disease affecting mostly women and causing various effects throughout different parts of the body. Its severity can range from very mild to extremely serious depending on which body organs are afflicted. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility of developing SLE. Type 12 is linked to a defect on chromosome 8p23.1.
  • Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, Susceptibility to, 13: Systemic Lupus Erythematosus is an autoimmune disease affecting mostly women and causing various effects throughout different parts of the body. Its severity can range from very mild to extremely serious depending on which body organs are afflicted. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility of developing SLE. Type 13 is linked to a defect on chromosome 6p23.
  • Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, Susceptibility to, 2: Systemic Lupus Erythematosus is an autoimmune disease affecting mostly women and causing various effects throughout different parts of the body. Its severity can range from very mild to extremely serious depending on which body organs are afflicted. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility of developing SLE. Type 2 is linked to a defect on chromosome 2q37.3.
  • Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, Susceptibility to, 3: Systemic Lupus Erythematosus is an autoimmune disease affecting mostly women and causing various effects throughout different parts of the body. Its severity can range from very mild to extremely serious depending on which body organs are afflicted. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility of developing SLE. Type 3 is linked to a defect on chromosome 4p16-p15.2.
  • Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, Susceptibility to, 4: Systemic Lupus Erythematosus is an autoimmune disease affecting mostly women and causing various effects throughout different parts of the body. Its severity can range from very mild to extremely serious depending on which body organs are afflicted. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility of developing SLE. Type 4 is linked to a defect on chromosome 12q24.
  • Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, Susceptibility to, 5: Systemic Lupus Erythematosus is an autoimmune disease affecting mostly women and causing various effects throughout different parts of the body. Its severity can range from very mild to extremely serious depending on which body organs are afflicted. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility of developing SLE. Type 5 is linked to a defect on chromosome 13q32.
  • Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, Susceptibility to, 6: Systemic Lupus Erythematosus is an autoimmune disease affecting mostly women and causing various effects throughout different parts of the body. Its severity can range from very mild to extremely serious depending on which body organs are afflicted. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility of developing SLE. Type 6 is linked to a defect on chromosome 16p11.2.
  • Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, Susceptibility to, 7: Systemic Lupus Erythematosus is an autoimmune disease affecting mostly women and causing various effects throughout different parts of the body. Its severity can range from very mild to extremely serious depending on which body organs are afflicted. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility of developing SLE. Type 7 is linked to a defect on chromosome 20p12.
  • Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, Susceptibility to, 8: Systemic Lupus Erythematosus is an autoimmune disease affecting mostly women and causing various effects throughout different parts of the body. Its severity can range from very mild to extremely serious depending on which body organs are afflicted. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility of developing SLE. Type 8 is linked to a defect on chromosome 20q13.1.
  • Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, Susceptibility to, 9: Systemic Lupus Erythematosus is an autoimmune disease affecting mostly women and causing various effects throughout different parts of the body. Its severity can range from very mild to extremely serious depending on which body organs are afflicted. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility of developing SLE. Type 9 is linked to a defect on chromosome 1q32.
  • Systemic lupus erythematosus: chronic autoimmune disease that can be fatal, though with recent medical advances, fatalities are becoming increasingly rare.
  • T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia: Cancer of particular white blood cells called T-cells. Precursors to white blood cells are called blasts and are made by the bone marrow but in ALL the blasts are abnormal and do not develop into lymphocytes. Instead, the abnormal blasts or leukemic cells multiply rapidly and reduce the level of other types of blood cells such as red blood cells and platelets.
  • Thymic epithelial tumor: A tumor that develops in the outer layers (epithelial) layers of the thymus. The tumor may be malignant or benign. The thymus produces white blood cells.
  • Thyroid cancer, anaplastic: A thyroid gland cancer that is quite aggressive and metastasizes to other parts of the body.
  • Toxoplasmosis: Infection often caught from cats and their feces.
  • Tuberculosis: Bacterial infection causing nodules forming, most commonly in the lung.
  • Tularemia: A rare infections disease caused by the bacterium Francisella tularensis (a gram-negative pleomorphic coccobacillus). Transmission occurs through contact with infected animals or there habitats e.g. bites from infected insects or other animals, eating infected wild animals, contact with contaminated water and soil. Symptoms can vary greatly depending on the method of infection. For example infection through inhalation can cause symptoms similar to pneumonia, eating infected animals can cause a sore throat and abdominal symptoms and transmission through the skin can cause result in a painful skin ulcer.
  • Vaccinia: A cowpox virus that was initially used for human smallpox vaccines.
  • Yellow sac spider poisoning: The yellow sac spider is a small spider found in Hawaii, eastern US, Utah and New England. The spider tends to hold on very tightly when it bites and often has to be physically removed. The venom contains a toxin which kills cells. Skin and sometimes systemic symptoms result - symptoms experience can vary amongst patients.

Conditions listing medical symptoms: Enlarged lymph nodes:

The following list of conditions have 'Enlarged lymph nodes' or similar listed as a symptom in our database. This computer-generated list may be inaccurate or incomplete. Always seek prompt professional medical advice about the cause of any symptom.

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