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Symptoms » Eye symptoms » Glossary
 

Glossary for Eye symptoms

Medical terms related to Eye symptoms or mentioned in this section include:

  • 14q+ syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder involving duplication of genetic material from the long arm (q) of chromosome 14 resulting in various abnormalities.
  • 14qter deletion Syndrome: A very rare genetic condition where a portion at the end of the long arm (q) of chromosome 14 is missing.
  • 18p minus syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder where a portion of chromosome 18 is missing which is characterized by mental and growth deficiencies, drooping upper eyelid and prominent ears. The type and severity of symptoms is determined by the amount of genetic material that is missing.
  • 1q deletion: A rare chromosomal disorder where part of the long arm (q) of chromosome 1 is deleted resulting in various abnormalities which are determined by the size of the deleted portion.
  • 1q terminal deletion: A rare chromosomal disorder where the terminal part of the long arm (q) of chromosome 1 is deleted resulting in various abnormalities.
  • 2-Hydroxyglutaricaciduria: A rare metabolic disorder characterized by high levels of a certain chemical (2-Hydroxyglutaric) which causes a serious progressive neurological disease and damage to the brain. The features of this disorder are variable and some cases are milder than others.
  • 2-Methylbutyric Aciduria: A very rare genetic disorder where an enzyme deficiency prevents the break down of certain proteins into energy and results in a harmful accumulation of acids in the blood and body tissues. More specifically, there is a deficiency of an enzyme (2-methylbutyryl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase) needed to convert the amino acid isoleucine into energy. 2-methylbutyrylglycine levels build up in the body and may cause damage. Symptoms vary according to the degree of enzyme deficiency - can range from asymptomatic to life-threatening.
  • 2-methylbutyryl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase deficiency: A very rare genetic disorder where an enzyme deficiency prevents the break down of certain proteins into energy and results in a harmful accumulation of acids in the blood and body tissues. More specifically, there is a deficiency of an enzyme (2-methylbutyryl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase) needed to convert the amino acid isoleucine into energy. 2-methylbutyrylglycine levels build up in the body and may cause damage. Symptoms vary according to the degree of enzyme deficiency - can range from asymptomatic to life-threatening.
  • 22q11.2 deletion syndrome: A rare genetic disorder caused by the absence of a small portion of genetic material. A small section of chromosome 22 is missing at a location called q11.2. Chromosome 22 is one of 23 pairs of chromosomes that exist in humans.
  • 2p21 deletion syndrome: This syndrome is a more severe form hypotonia-cystinuria syndrome as a larger portion of genetic material from chromosome 2p21 is deleted. It is characterized by infant seizures, reduced muscle tone, developmental delay, lactic acidosis and unusual facial appearance.
  • 2q deletion: A rare chromosomal disorder where part of the long arm (q) of chromosome 2 is deleted resulting in various abnormalities which are determined by the size of the deleted portion.
  • 3 alpha methylglutaconicaciduria, type 3: A rare genetic condition where a gene mutation prevents the production of certain protein which leads to a build-up of an acid (3-methylglutaconic acid) which can have a negative impact on the body. The condition is characterized mainly by damage to the optic nerve.
  • 3-Hydroxyacyl-CoA Dehydrogenase II Deficiency: A rare genetic disorder involving the deficiency of an enzyme (hydroxyacyl-coa dehydrogenase). The severity of the symptoms is highly variable with some cases resulting in death during the first decade while others suffer psychomotor and regression. Symptoms tend to be more severe in males who suffer progressive neurodegeneration whereas females tend to suffer mainly from developmental delay.
  • 3-M Syndrome: A rare genetic condition which is characterized by distinctive physical features and severe growth retardation that starts during the fetal stage. Intelligence is not affected.
  • 3-methylglutaconic aciduria, type 1: A recessively inherited metabolic disorder characterized by methylglutaconic acid in the urine.
  • 3-methylglutaconic aciduria, type 4: A rare genetic disorder where the body's cells are unable to make sufficient energy resulting in an accumulation in the body of 3-methylglutaconic acid. Type 4 is characterized by symptoms which overlap type 1 and 3.
  • 3-methylglutaconic aciduria, type V: A rare genetic disorder where the body's cells are unable to make sufficient energy resulting in an accumulation in the body of 3-methylglutaconic acid.
  • 3C syndrome: A rare disorder characterized by cardiac malformations, cerebellar hypoplasia and cranial dysmorphism which gives the disease it's name.
  • 3q deletion: A rare chromosomal disorder where part of the long arm (q) of chromosome 3 is deleted resulting in various abnormalities which are determined by the size of the deleted portion.
  • 46,XX chromosome 7 deletion p13: A chromosomal disorder where a small portion of chromosome 7 is deleted which results in a range of abnormalities.
  • 46,XY chromosome 7 deletion p13-p21: A chromosomal disorder where a small portion of chromosome 7 is deleted which results in a range of abnormalities.
  • 47,XXX syndrome: A genetic condition where females have an extra X chromosome in each of their cells. Normally female cells have two X chromosomes. This is not usually an inherited condition but a defect that occurs during cell division. Often the condition is asymptomatic.
  • 49,XXXXX syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder that affects only females and involves body cells having five copies of the X chromosome instead of the normal two.
  • 49,XXXXY syndrome: A rare sex chromosome abnormality where there are three extra copies of the X chromosome.
  • 4p16.3 deletion: A rare genetic disorder where a portion of chromosome 4 is deleted at a location called 16.3. The condition is characterized by malformations in most parts of the body as the deletion affects growth and development of the fetus.
  • 8p-Syndrome, partial: A rare chromosomal disorder where there is one copy of part of the short arm (p) of chromosome 8 rather than the normal two. The type and severity of symptoms is determined by the location and size of the genetic material deleted.
  • ACPS III: A rare genetic condition characterized by head and digital anomalies as well as other abnormalities.
  • AChR deficiency and short channel open time: Extremely rare condition characterized by respiratory insufficiency from birth, facial dysplasia and paralysis of eye muscles.
  • AIDS dysmorphic syndrome: A rare syndrome involving craniofacial anomalies and developmental delay that occurs in infants infected with AIDS during the fetal stage.
  • ATR-X syndrome: A rare X-linked disorder that affects males and is characterized by mental retardation and alpha thalassemia.
  • Aarskog Syndrome: A rare genetic condition characterized by facial, hand, genital and growth abnormalities.
  • Aase Smith syndrome: A rare hereditary syndrome characterized by deformities such as cleft palate, joint contractures and hypoplastic anemia.
  • Aase Syndrome: A genetic condition which results in anaemia and some skeletal and joint deformities
  • Aase-Smith I syndrome: A very rare hereditary syndrome characterized by deformities such as joint contractures, anemia, hydrocephalus and cleft palate.
  • Abdominal Cancer: Growth of abnormal cells (tumour) affecting the organs in the abdominal cavity; may be due to primary growth of a tumour or spread from another tumour (metastases, secondary tumour)
  • Abetalipoproteinemia: A rare genetic disorder involving fat metabolism. The disorder is also known as Bassen-Kornzweig syndrome. Signs of the disease include acanthocytosis, little or no serum beta-lipoproteins and hypocholesterolemia. In severe cases, steatorrhea, ataxia, nystagmus, motor incoordination and retinitis pigmentosa may also occur.
  • Ablepharon macrostomia syndrome: A rare disorder involving a number of mainly physical abnormalities.
  • Ablinism I syndrome: A recessively inherited form of albinism involving the complete lack of skin, hair and eye pigments.
  • Abnormal eye movements: Uncontrollable eye movements are involuntary, rapid, and repetitive movement of the eyes.
  • Abnormal involuntary movements of the eyes: involuntary spasms of the eyelid muscles.
  • Abnormal pupillary response to light: the pupillary light reflex is the reduction of pupil size in response to light. A sluggish or slow pupillary response is known as an abnormal pupillary response to light
  • Abnormal pupillary size: pathological increase or decrease in the pupil size
  • Abnormal pupillary size in one eye: Abnormal pupillary size in one eye refers to an uncharacteristically small or large pupil in one eye.
  • Abnormal sensitivity to light: dislike of bright light
  • Abnormal sensitivity to light in both eyes: Abnormal sensitivity to light in both eyes is a condition in which the eyes are unusually sensitive to light, also called photosensitivity.
  • Abnormal sensitivity to light in one eye: Abnormal sensitivity to light in one eye is a condition in which one eye is unusually sensitive to light, also called photosensitivity.
  • Abrupt loss of vision in both eyes: Abrupt loss of vision in both eyes is a serious condition in which there is sudden blindness or decreased, disrupted, or blurred vision in both eyes.
  • Abrupt loss of vision in one eye: Abrupt loss of vision in one eye is a serious condition in which there is sudden blindness or decreased, disrupted, or blurred vision in one eye.
  • Abruzzo Erickson syndrome: A genetic disorder characterized by a combination of features including cleft palate, coloboma and deafness.
  • Abscess: This is an area of puss collected in a cavity which is constituted by necrotised tissue
  • Absence of doll's eye sign: Reflex movement of the eyes such that the eyes lower as the head is raised, indicating functional integrity of the nerve pathways involved in eye movement
  • Absence of septum pellucidum and septo-optic dysplasia: A rare birth defect where a thin membrane in the middle of the brain is missing. This brain abnormality is never present on it's own but is a characteristic of septo-optic dysplasia where the patient also has optic disk abnormalities and pituitary deficiencies.
  • Absence of septum pellucidum with porencephalia syndrome: A rare syndrome present at birth and characterized by the absence of the thin membrane in the middle of the brain (septum pellucidum) as well as abnormal cavities in the brain (porencephaly). The syndrome also involves other structural brain abnormalities.
  • Absence seizure: An epileptic seizure involving momentary loss of consciousness.
  • Absent abdominal musculature with microphthalmia and joint laxity: A rare disorder characterized mainly by small eyes, loose joints, a lack of abdominal muscles and facial anomalies.
  • Absent alpha 1 band: An absence of alpha-1-antitrypsin the the body
  • Absent corneal reflex: Loss of blinking when the edge of the cornea is touched.
  • Absent corneal reflex in one eye: Absent corneal reflex in one eye is the lack of a blink reflex in one eye.
  • Absent corpus callosum -- cataract -- immunodeficiency: A rare syndrome characterized by immunodeficiency, cleft lip or palate, cataract, reduced pigmentation and brain abnormalities.
  • Absidia species poisoning: Absidia species is a type of fungus found in plant debris but is also common in the environment. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Absolute Glaucoma: The final stage of blindness in glaucoma in which a glaucoma-induced increase in intraocular pressure results in permanent vision loss.
  • Acanthamoeba: Several conditions from infection with ameba.
  • Acanthamoeba infection: Infection with a microscopic, free-living ameba that is readily found in the environment - soil, air and water. Most people exposed to the ameba will not become infected but when infections do occur, they tend to affect the eyes, central nervous system or can cause widespread infection throughout the body.
  • Acanthamoeba infection of the eye: Infection by an amoebic organism called Acanthamoeba. Infection usually occurs when the amoeba enters through a break in the skin or through the nose. Infection can be localized or systemic where it can involve the central nervous system and cause potentially fatal meningoencephalitis. Infection of the eye can occur by cleaning contact lenses in contaminated water.
  • Acanthamoeba keratitis: Infection of the eye with a microscopic, free-living ameba (Acanthamoeba) that is readily found in the environment - soil, air and water. Infection most often occurs through exposure to contaminated water while wearing contact lenses e.g. swimming or showering in infected waters.
  • Acanthocytosis: A rare disorder where most of the red blood cells are abnormal with spiny projections due to lipid abnormalities. The blood abnormality is seen in conditions such as abetalipoproteinemia, severe liver disease and severe malnutrition. Symptoms and prognosis depend on the underlying disorder.
  • Accelerated hypertension: Accelerated hypertension is a condition characterized by a rapid increase in blood pressure. The condition is a medical emergency which can cause organ damage if not treated promptly.
  • Accidental Eye Injury: The accidental injury to an eye
  • Aceruloplasminemia: A rare genetic disorder characterized by a lack of the protein ceruloplasmin in the blood resulting in a buildup of iron in the liver, brain and pancreas. This in turn causes diabetes and degeneration of the neural system causing tremors and walking abnormalities.
  • Achalasia -- Addisonianism -- Alacrimia syndrome: A rare inherited disorder characterized mainly by achalasia, alacrimia (absent tears) and Addison's disease. Addison's disease involves adrenal insufficiency due to a resistance to adrenocorticotropic hormone. Only about 70 cases reported worldwide.
  • Achalasia -- addisonianism -- alacrima syndrome: A rare inherited disorder characterized mainly by achalasia, alacrimia (absent tears) and Addison's disease. Addison's disease involves adrenal insufficiency due to a resistance to adrenocorticotropic hormone. Only about 70 cases reported worldwide.
  • Achalasia -- adrenal -- alacrima syndrome: A familial disorder characterized by adrenal gland-related hormonal problems, swallowing difficulty (achalasia) and a lack of tears (alacrima). Neurological impairment and motor and sensory neuropathy is progressive. The adrenal glands in patients are resistant to the ACTH hormone and hence fails to operate normally.
  • Achard syndrome: An inherited connective tissue disorder characterized primarily by a short head, long, slender bones, recessed lower jaw and loose hand and foot joints.
  • Aching eyes: A sensation of aching located in the eyes
  • Achondroplasia: A rare disease characterized by abnormal bone growth which results in short stature with short arms and legs, large head and characteristic facial features.
  • Achromatopsia: Patients who have achromatopsia (sometimes called achromatopia) do not have normal "cone vision.". Although the term may refer to acquired disorders such as color agnosia and cerebral achromatopsia, it typically refers to an autosomal recessive congenital color vision disorder, the inability to perceive color AND to achieve satisfactory visual acuity at high light levels (typically exterior daylight).
  • Achromatopsia 2: A rare form of colorblindness involving atypical rod monochromatism which and causing pendular nystagmus and photophobia.
  • Achromatopsia 3: A rare form of colorblindness which also involves myopia.
  • Achromatopsia incomplete, X-linked: An inherited form of blue color blindness.
  • Achromatopsia type 2: A rare form of colorblindness involving atypical rod monochromatism which and causing pendular nystagmus and photophobia.
  • Achromatopsia with Myopia: A rare form of colorblindness which also involves myopia.
  • Acid-Base Imbalance: A disruption to the normal acid-base equilibrium in the body. There are four main groups of disorder involving an acid-base imbalance: respiratory acidosis or alkalosis and metabolic acidosis or alkalosis. Obviously the severity of symptoms is determined by the degree of imbalance.
  • Acoustic Neurinoma: A benign tumor of the 8th cranial nerve which lies in the tube connecting the inner ear to the brain.
  • Acoustic neuroma: A rare benign tumor that forms in the hearing canal. Can cause tinnitus, progressive hearing loss, headaches, facial numbness, papilledema, dizziness and an unsteady walk. Speaking and swallowing difficulty can occur in advanced stages. Also called acoustic neurilemoma, acoustic neurinoma and acoustic neurofibroma.
  • Acquired angioedema: A rare disorder characterized by recurring episodes of swelling of parts of the skin or mucous membranes. Sometimes internal organs may be involved. The disorder occurs in patients with lymphoproliferative or autoimmune disorders which result in the dysfunction of a complex blood protein called C1 inhibitor.
  • Acquired angioedema, type 1: A rare disorder characterized by recurring episodes of swelling of parts of the skin or mucous membranes. Sometimes internal organs may be involved. The disorder occurs in patients with lymphoproliferative disorders which affects the function of a complex blood protein called C1 inhibitor.
  • Acquired angioedema, type 2: A rare disorder characterized by recurring episodes of swelling of parts of the skin or mucous membranes. Sometimes internal organs may be involved. Type 2 is an autoimmune disorder where patients develop autoantibodies which destroy the function of C1 esterase inhibitor.
  • Acro-pectoro-renal field defect: A very rare genetic syndrome characterized by abnormalities of the genital and urinary systems as well as the absence of chest muscles at birth.
  • Acro-reno-ocular syndrome: A disorder characterized by eye abnormalities, kidney defects and abnormalities of the arm and hand bones.
  • Acrocallosal Syndrome (Schinzel Type): A rare condition characterized by absence of portion of the brain (corpus callosum), mental deficiency, duplicated toes, mental deficiency and other abnormalities.
  • Acrocallosal syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by underdeveloped or absent corpus callosum of brain, duplication of thumb or big toe and extra fingers or toes.
  • Acrocephalopolydactyly -- Cardiac Disease -- Ear, Skin and Lower Limb Defects: A rare genetic condition characterized by head and digital anomalies as well as other abnormalities.
  • Acrocephalopolydactyly II: A rare genetic disorder characterized by head, hand and genital anomalies as well as mental retardation.
  • Acrocephalopolysyndactyly type III: A rare genetic condition characterized by head and digital anomalies as well as other abnormalities.
  • Acrocephalopolysyndactyly, type 2 (ACPS 2): A rare genetic disorder characterized by premature closing of skull bones, craniofacial abnormalities, heart defects, growth retardation and other disorders.
  • Acrocephalosyndactyly II: A rare inherited disorder characterized primarily by premature closure of skull bones, fusion of fingers and toes and eye and face abnormalities.
  • Acrocephalosyndactyly Syndrome type 5: A rare genetic disorder where some of the skull bones fuse too early which affects the size and shape of the skull and face. Thumb and toe abnormalities are also present. There are three types of Pfeiffer syndrome with varying degrees of severity.
  • Acrocephalosyndactyly type 3 (ACPS 3): A rare genetic disorder characterized by premature joining of certain skull bones during development which has an impact on the shape of the head and face. Features include brachycephaly, ear deformities as well as craniofacial, finger and bone abnormalities.
  • Acrocephalosyndactyly type 5 (ACPS 5): A rare genetic disorder where some of the skull bones fuse too early which affects the size and shape of the skull and face. Thumb and toe abnormalities are also present. There are three types of Pfeiffer syndrome with varying degrees of severity.
  • Acrodynia: A disease occurring in infants or young children. Symptoms include edema, pruritis, skin rash, extremities are pink, cheeks and nose are scarlet, profuse sweating, digestive disturbance, photophobia, polyneuritis, irritability, listlessness, apathy and failure to thrive.
  • Acrofacial dysostosis Preis type: One of a group of disorders characterized by defective limb and facial development. The Preis type is very rare and the range and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Acrofacial dysostosis Rodriguez type: One of a group of disorders characterized by defective limb and facial development. The Rodriguez type is very rare and primarily involves severe limb and organ malformations.
  • Acrofacial dysostosis atypical postaxial: A rare genetic disorder characterized by absence of some fingers and toes and characteristic facial features.
  • Acrofacial dysostosis, Palagonia type: One of a group of disorders characterized by defective limb and facial development. The Palagonia type is very rare and the symptoms are relatively mild.
  • Acrofrontofacionasal dysostosis syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized by abnormalities of the bones of the skeleton as well as mental retardation. Various facial, eye and urogenital anomalies are also present.
  • Acromegaloid changes, cutis verticis gyrata and corneal leukoma: A rare disorder characterized by acromegaly (enlarged extremeties) , furrowed skin on scalp and face and corneal leukomas.
  • Acromegaloid facies -- hypertrichosis: A very rare genetic disorder characterized by thick lips and gums, thick upper eyelids, large hands and occasionally mental deficiency.
  • Acromegaloid hypertrichosis syndrome: A rare genetic condition characterized by excess body hair and a coarse face. The severity of the condition is variable.
  • Acromegaloid, Cutis Verticis Gyrata, Corneal Leukoma Syndrome: A rare condition characterized by the association of acromegaly, cutis verticis gyrate and corneal leukoma.
  • Acromegaly: An abnormal enlargement of the limbs due to increased secretion of growth hormone after the cessation of puberty
  • Acromelic frontonasal dysplasia: A very rare genetic malformation syndrome characterized by developmental abnormalities of the face and brain.
  • Acromicric dysplasia: A rare genetic syndrome characterized by various severe developmental abnormalities of the skeletal bones and facial anomalies.
  • Acroosteolysis neurogenic: A very rare inherited condition characterized mainly by the loss of all sensations - the lose the ability to feel pain, temperature and touch. The loss of sensation generally starts at the toes and fingers and spreads up the limbs and the trunk may also be involved in some cases.
  • Acrosphenosyndactylia: A rare condition characterized by abnormalities in the appearance of the face and head as well as finger and toe abnormalities. The bones of the skull fuse together too early which prevents it from growing normally. Various toes and fingers may be fused together.
  • Acutane embryopathy: A rare disorder caused by fetal exposure to retinoids and resulting in mental and physical birth defects.
  • Acute Angle Closure Glaucoma: Primary angle closure is defined as an occludable drainage angle and features indicating that trabecular obstruction by the peripheral iris has occurred (ie, peripheral anterior synechiae, increased IOP, lens opacities, excessive trabecular pigmentation deposits).
  • Acute Bokhoror: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. Death is common in the acute phase of the infection which can last from four days to four months.
  • Acute Chemical poisoning -- Varnish makers' and painters' Naptha: Varnish makers' and painters' Naptha is an ingredient used in certain pesticides. Exposure to the chemical can cause a range of symptoms depending on the level and route of exposure. Exposure can occur through inhalation, ingestion, the skin or eyes. Acute exposure involves a exposure over a short period of time whereas chronic exposure occurs over a longer period of time.
  • Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis: A type of encephalitis that usually follows an acute viral infection and involves an immune attack on myelin tissue which is part of the nervous system. Initial symptoms include fever, headache, vomiting and drowsiness followed by seizures, coma and paralysis. Often results in permanent neurological disorders.
  • Acute Pesticide poisoning -- Ureas: Urea is a class of active ingredients used in certain defoliants, herbicides, insecticides and rodenticides. Exposure to the chemical can cause a range of symptoms depending on the level and route of exposure. Exposure can occur through inhalation, ingestion, the skin or eyes. Acute exposure involves a exposure over a short period of time whereas chronic exposure occurs over a longer period of time.
  • Acute Pesticide poisoning -- xylene: Xylene is an ingredient used in certain insecticides. Exposure to the chemical can cause a range of symptoms depending on the level and route of exposure. Exposure can occur through inhalation, ingestion, the skin or eyes. Acute exposure involves a exposure over a short period of time whereas chronic exposure occurs over a longer period of time.
  • Acute Posterior Multifocal Placoid Pigment Epitheliopathy: A acute acquired condition which is an inflammatory one affecting the retina of healthy young adults
  • Acute VE: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. Death is common in the acute phase of the infection which can last from four days to four months.
  • Acute Viliuisk Encephalitis: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. Death is common in the acute phase of the infection which can last from four days to four months.
  • Acute Viliuisk Encephalomyelitis: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. Death is common in the acute phase of the infection which can last from four days to four months.
  • Acute Vilyuisk Encephalitis: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. Death is common in the acute phase of the infection which can last from four days to four months.
  • Acute Vilyuisk Encephalomyelitis: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. Death is common in the acute phase of the infection which can last from four days to four months.
  • Acute Vision Changes in Both Eyes (with pain or inflammation): Vision changes occurring in both eyes, of sudden onset or over a short term period of hours to days with associated symptoms of pain and/or inflammation.
  • Acute Vision Changes in Both Eyes (without pain or inflammation): Vision changes occurring in both eyes, of sudden onset or over a short term period of hours to days without symptoms of pain or inflammation.
  • Acute Vision Changes in One Eye (Without pain or inflammation): Vision changes occurring in one eye only, of sudden onset or over a short term period of hours to days without symptoms of pain or inflammation.
  • Acute allergy-like eye redness: redness of the eye maybe due to conjunctival, scleral or corneal inflammation
  • Acute allergy-like runny eyes: allergy is one of the main factors for watering of eyes
  • Acute blindness: An acute loss of vision
  • Acute congestive glaucoma: This is a closed angle type of glaucoma, caused by contact between the iris and trabecular meshwork, which in turn obstructs outflow of the aqueous humor from the eye.
  • Acute conjunctival inflammation: Acute conjunctival inflammation is the sudden onset of redness and irritation of the membranes that covers the white of the eyes and the inner part of the eyelids.
  • Acute diabetes-like retinopathy symptoms: diabetic retinopathy can cause many sudden changes in the retinal pattern such as microaneurysms, cotton-wool spots, flame-shaped hemorrhages and hard exudates
  • Acute fulminant multiple sclerosis: Malignant Multiple Sclerosis, is a particularly aggressive form of the disease. Thankfully very rare, this highly aggressive form is defined by its swift and relentless decline to significant disability or even death, often within a few weeks or months after the onset of the initial attack. It is characterized by widespread and progressive cerebral white matter destruction or by severe pathological involvement of clinically strategic regions such as brainstem, resulting in bulbar paralysis.
  • Acute hay fever-like runny eyes: hay fever is caused by pollens of specific seasonal plants, airborne chemicals and dust particles in people who are allergic to these substances
  • Acute headache: Headache, or cephalgia, is defined as diffuse pain in various parts of the head, with the pain not confined to the area of distribution of a nerve.
  • Acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis:
  • Acute megacaryoblastic leukemia: A rare form of malignant bone marrow cancer involving the proliferation of immature precursors of blood cells. More specifically, it involves the rapid proliferation of megakaryoblasts (premature form of megakaryocytes).
  • Acute meningitis: Acute meningitis is an inflammation of the brain that presents in an acute fashion. The inflammation may be the result of infective agents such as bacteria, viruses and fungi as well as non-infective agents such as certain drugs. Acute forms of meningitis can develop in within hours or days whereas chronic meningitis develops over weeks or months.
  • Acute posterior multifocal placoid pigment: A rare eye disease where the central vision in one or both eyes is affected by inflammation or fluid build up in the retina. The retina lies at the back of the eye. Symptoms such as fever, headache and malaise often precede the eye symptoms. The cause of the condition is unknown but may have autoimmune origins.
  • Acute retinal necrosis:
  • Acute retinal necrosis syndrome: An acute infection of the eye usually caused by the chicken pox virus (varicella-zoster), herpes simplex or cytomegalovirus. One or both eyes may be involved.
  • Acute sinusitis: An acute inflammation of the sinuses
  • Acute tubulointerstitial nephritis and uveitis syndrome: The association of a sudden kidney disorder with eye inflammation. Autoimmune processes are believed to be involved.
  • Acute upper respiratory infection: Upper respiratory tract infections, are the illnesses caused by an acute infection which involves the upper respiratory tract: nose, sinuses, pharynx or larynx
  • Acute vision changes in one eye (painful or inflamed eye): Vision changes occurring in one eye only, of sudden onset or over a short term period of hours to days with associated symptoms of pain and/or inflammation.
  • Acute vitamin A toxicity: Acute ingestion of vitamin A can cause symptoms. Symptoms usually only last for a day or two.
  • Acute zonal occult outer retinopathy: A very rare eye disorder where the retina at the back of the eye becomes inflamed. Vision loss usually starts suddenly and may then progress for a while. The cause of the inflammation is unknown. Usually vision returns to normal in 1 to 3 years but some people have permanent vision impairment
  • Adam and Eve poisoning: The Adam and Eve plant is a herb with heart-shaped leaves found in Europe. The plant contains a poisonous chemical called calcium oxalate crystals which can cause a variety of symptoms if ingested. Eye exposure can also cause symptoms due to the abrasive nature of the toxic chemical. Ingestion of the plant generally causes severe mouth pain. Skin exposure usually only causes minor, short-lived skin irritation.
  • Adams Nance syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by rapid heartbeat, high blood pressure, small eyes and the presence of excess glycine in the urine.
  • Addiction symptoms: Symptoms related to addiction (physical or mental addiction)
  • Adducted thumbs Dundar type: A rare disorder characterized by a thumb abnormality as well as mental retardation, foot defects and other anomalies.
  • Adenoid cystic carcinoma: A malignant cancer in the form of cysts which may occur in the salivary glands, breast, mucous glands of the respiratory tract and sometimes in vulval vestibular glands. Also called adeoncystic carcinoma, adenomyoepithelioma, cribriform carcinoma or cylindroma.
  • Adenoviridae Infections: Infection with a virus from the Adenoviridae family. The most common sites for infection are membrane linings such as the intestines, respiratory and urinary tract and the eyes. The infection may result in a range of symptoms depending on the particular virus involved. Transmission usually occurs through breathing in the germs or through fecal-oral contact. The infection is contagious.
  • Adenovirus infection in immunocompromised patients: Infection with a virus from the Adenoviridae family that occurs in a patient with a weakened immune system. The infection in these people is serious and can be fatal. The infection may result in a range of symptoms depending on the particular virus involved. Transmission usually occurs through breathing in the germs or through fecal-oral contact.
  • Adenovirus-related Cold: An Adenovirus-related cold is a relatively minor contagious infection of the nose and throat caused by the Adenovirus. Although colds can cause discomfort they are not considered a serious condition.
  • Adhesive abuse: Adhesive abuse is the use of various inhalants for the purpose of achieving a "high". They are often used as a cheap, readily available alternative to street drugs but they can cause serious damage to the body. Adhesives include household glues, rubber cement and model aeroplane glue. These adhesives can be abused by sniffing them, spraying directly into the mouth, heating them and then inhaling them or injecting them directly into the body.
  • Adhesive addiction: Adhesive addiction refers to the compulsive need to abuse adhesives (e.g. sniffing them). Sufferers have withdrawal symptoms when attempting to stop the habit and feel unable to stop the habit despite knowing the harm it is causing their health. Aerosols are very damaging to the body and can readily result permanent brain damage and even death. Death can occur through chronic use and in rare cases can occur after one session of use. Children and teenagers are particular at risk for this type of addiction - it is readily available and users feel it gains them greater acceptance from their peers. Adhesives includes household glue, rubber cement and model airplane glue.
  • Adie syndrome: A rare condition where the pupil of the eye is dilated and reacts very slowly to light and other stimulus. Knee and ankle reflexes are also impaired.
  • Adies Syndrome: A condition where the pupil of one eye responds slower to a stimulus such as light or change in distance than the other as well as reduced or absent tendon reflexes (eg in the ankle and knee jerk reflexes).
  • Adnexal and Skin Appendage Neoplasms: A type of tumour that develops on particular organs - eyes, skin and uterus. The tumors are usually benign but some may become malignant. The symptoms will vary depending on the location of the tumor and whether it is benign or malignant. These type of tumors tend to be most common in middle-aged women.
  • Adolescent cataract and infertility syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by cataracts and infertility in male adolescents.
  • Adrenal hypertension: Adrenal hypertension is high blood pressure caused by adrenal gland problems. For example, an adrenal tumor can cause excessive production of aldosterone which in turn causes salt-retention and high blood pressure. Severity of symptoms varies depending on the underlying cause.
  • Adrenoleukodystrophy: A rare hereditary metabolic disease that only occurs in male children and is characterized by adrenal atrophy and extensive cerebral demyelination causing progressive loss of mental functioning, aphasia, apraxia and sometimes blindness. The patient usually dies within 5 years.
  • Adrenoleukodystrophy, autosomal, neonatal form: A rare inherited disorder involving the adrenal glands, testes and certain parts of the brain (white matter). It is a less severe form of leukodystrophy where an abnormality within the body cells prevents the metabolism of certain fats (long chain fatty acids).
  • Adrenomyeloneuropathy: A form of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy characterized by spinal cord dysfunction and brain involvement may or may not be present. Those with brain involvement suffer serious symptoms that can eventually lead to total disability and even death.
  • Adverse reaction to chemical -- 1,1-Dichloroethene: 1,1-Dichloroethene is a chemical used in packaging, food wraps, carpet backing, adhesives and steel pipe coating. Some people can suffer an adverse reaction to the chemical. The severity of symptoms varies amongst patients.
  • Adverse reaction to chemical -- 1,2-Dibromo-3-Chloropropane: 1,2-Dibromo-3-Chloropropane is a chemical used in soil fumigants and as a nematocide for various field crops. Commercial examples include Fumagon, Nemagon, Fumazone, Nemapax, Nemafume. Some people can suffer an adverse reaction to the chemical. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the route of exposure.
  • Adverse reaction to chemical -- 1-Propanol: 1-Propanol is a chemical used in various antiseptics, polishes, cleaners, cosmetics and lacquer. Some people can suffer an adverse reaction to the chemical which mainly involves irritation to the part of the body exposed to the chemical - eyes, skin and gastrointestinal. The severity of symptoms varies amongst patients.
  • Adverse reaction to chemical -- Allyl trichloride: Allyl trichloride is a chemical used mainly as a varnish or paint remover, cleaning agent or degreasing agent. Some people can suffer an adverse reaction to the chemical. The severity of symptoms varies amongst patients.
  • Adversive syndrome: A rare condition where the patient turns compulsively when trying to move forwards. It can be caused by damage to a part of the brain called the Brodmann's area, neurosurghery, brain tumor or other brain lesions.
  • Aerosol abuse: Aerosol abuse is the use of various inhalants for the purpose of achieving a "high". They are often used as a cheap, readily available alternative to street drugs but they can cause serious damage to the body. Aerosols include air fresheners, hair spray, spray pain and deodorants. These aerosols can be abused by sniffing them, spraying directly into the mouth, heating them and then inhaling them or injecting them directly into the body.
  • Aerosol addiction: Aerosol addiction refers to the compulsive need to abuse aerosol (e.g. sniffing them). Sufferers have withdrawal symptoms when attempting to stop the habit and feel unable to stop the habit despite knowing the harm it is causing their health. Aerosols are very damaging to the body and can readily result permanent brain damage and even death. Death can occur through chronic use and in rare cases can occur after one session of use. Children and teenagers are particular at risk for this type of addiction - it is readily available and users feel it gains them greater acceptance from their peers. Aerosols includes spray pain, air freshener, deodorants and hair sprays.
  • African milk bush poisoning: The African milk bush originated from African and is a shrubby plant with small flowers. The milky sap contains diterpene esters which can cause symptoms if it is eaten or if the sap comes into contact with the skin or eyes. It can cause severe skin irritation and the high toxicity of the sap can cause death if sufficient quantities are eaten.
  • Agammaglobulinemia -- microcephaly -- craniosynostosis -- severe dermatitis: A rare disorder characterized by a small head, agammaglobuliemia and severe dermatitis.
  • Agammaglobulinemia, microcephaly, and severe dermatitis: A rare disorder characterized by a small head, agammaglobuliemia and severe dermatitis.
  • Agapanthus poisoning: The agapanthus is a flowering herb with long leaves, long thick stems and a cluster of blue or white flowers. The plant originated in South Africa. Skin and eye exposure to sap from the plant can cause irritation and eating the plant can cause severe mouth pain. The skin irritation tends to be short-lived.
  • Age-related macular degeneration: Deterioration of the central field of vision.
  • Agenesis of the corpus callosum -- mental retardation -- coloboma -- micrognathia: A rare inherited disorder characterized by mental retardation, coloboma, small jaw and a brain anomaly.
  • Aging: The medical conditions from getting older.
  • Agnathia-holoprosencephaly-situs inversus: A very rare disorder characterized by a small or absent jaw, developmental brain defect and internal organs situated on the wrong side of the body (situs inversus). The severity and range of symptoms is variable.
  • Aicardi syndrome: A rare genetic disorder where the structure connecting the two halves of the brain fails to develop which results in seizures and eye abnormalities .
  • Air embolism: A condition where an air bubble enters the cardiovascular system (via injection, intravenous therapy, surgery or puncture wound) and obstructs the blood flow.
  • Airborne allergy: An airborne allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to airborne allergens such as pollen, mold spores and house dust mites. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Akaba-Hayasaka syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by a prominent forehead, cloudy corneas, low nasal bridge, underdeveloped chest and short limbs.
  • Akesson syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized by excessive skin folds and furrows on the scalp, mental retardation the failure of the thyroid to develop.
  • Al Gazali -- Nair syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized by bone abnormalities, eye problems, seizures and developmental delay. The reported cases involved related parents.
  • Al Gazali-Khidr-Prem Chandran: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by short stature, eye problems and an unusual cherubic facial appearance.
  • Al Gazali-Khidr-Prem Chandran syndrome:
  • Al Murrah-induced lead poisoning: Al Murrah is a folk remedy used mainly by Saudi Arabian people to treat problems such as stomach pain, diarrhea and colic. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Alacrimia, congenital: A birth defect characterized by a lack of tear production occurs from infancy. The lack of tears may stem from defects in the glands that produce the tears or in the tear ducts which carry the tubes.
  • Alagille syndrome: A genetic disorder affecting the liver and characterized by the absence of some or all of the liver bile ducts that transport bile within the liver.
  • Alar cartilages hypoplasia -- coloboma -- telecanthus: A rare inherited disorder characterized by a cleft in the nose cartilage and an increased distance between the corner of the eye and the nose (telecanthus).
  • Alarcon-induced lead poisoning: Alarcon is a folk remedy used mainly by Mexican people to treat digestive or stomach problems including indigestion and diarrhea. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Albayaidle-induced lead poisoning: Albayaidle is a folk remedy used mainly by Mexican and Central American people to treat digestive or stomach problems such as vomiting and colic. It is also used to treat apathy and lethargy. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Albayalde-induced lead poisoning: Albayalde is a folk remedy used mainly by Mexican and Central American people to treat digestive or stomach problems such as vomiting and colic. It is also used to treat apathy and lethargy. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Albers-Schonberg disease -- Adult benign dominant form: A rare disorder characterized primarily by increased bone density as old bone is not resorbed and replaced with new bone - is also known as marble bone disease. The adult benign form is associated with a normal life expectancy and is often asymptomatic.
  • Albers-Schonberg disease -- intermediate form: A rare disorder characterized primarily by increased bone density as old bone is not resorbed and replaced with new bone - is also known as marble bone disease. The intermediate form is more severe than the adult form but less severe than the infantile form. Life expectancy is usually normal.
  • Albers-Schonberg disease -- malignant recessive form: A rare disorder characterized primarily by increased bone density as old bone is not resorbed and replaced with new bone - is also known as marble bone disease. The malignant infantile form is the most severe form of this disorder and death usually occurs in the first decade of life.
  • Albinism ocular late onset sensorineural deafness: A rare inherited condition characterized by a lack of eye pigmentation and deafness that usually starts in middle-age. Severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Albinism, ocular, autosomal recessive: A rare inherited condition characterized by reduced eye pigmentation with normal, or near normal hair and skin pigmentation.
  • Albinism-deafness of Tietz: Tietz syndrome is a relatively rare condition characterized by deafness and albinism. It should not be confused with the similarly named Tietz's syndrome which involves inflammation of chest cartilage.
  • Albright's hereditary osteodystrophy: A rare genetic disorder where the body fails to recognize and respond to the parathyroid hormone. The parathyroid hormone is involved in controlling the blood levels of calcium and phosphate.
  • Alcohol Withdrawal: Symptoms that occur when alcohol consumption is discontinued or reduced. Symptoms may vary depending on the level of dependence.
  • Alcohol abuse: Excessive alcohol as a symptom of other conditions
  • Alcohol drinking: The consumption of a drink containing alcohol. Alcohol consumption can cause varying degrees of impairment depending on the amount consumed. Consuming very large amounts of alcohol can lead to death.
  • Alcohol-Induced Disorders: Disorders caused by excessive alcohol consumption. The symptoms are variable depending on the disorder involved. Some of the disorders are: alcohol abuse, alcohol dependence, alcohol intoxication, alcohol withdrawal, alcohol intoxication delirium, alcohol withdrawal delirium, alcohol-induced persisting dementia, alcohol-induced persisting amnestic disorder, alcohol-induced psychotic disorder, alcohol-induced mood disorder, alcohol-induced anxiety disorder, alcohol-induced sexual dysfunction, alcohol-induced sleep disorder, liver damage, liver cancer and esophageal cancer.
  • Alcohol-induced hypertension: Alcohol-induced hypertension is high blood pressure caused by excessive drinking of alcohol.
  • Alezzandrini syndrome: A rare condition involving degenerative eye disease in one eye, followed by other facial symptoms on the same side and hearing impairment. The condition progresses over months or years.
  • Allergic conjunctivitis: also known as vernal catarrah
  • Allergies: Immune system over-reaction to various substances.
  • Allergy-like eye redness: redness of the eye maybe due to conjunctival, scleral or corneal inflammation
  • Alopecia immunodeficiency: A rare syndrome characterized by alopecia and primary immunodeficiency.
  • Alopecia mental retardation hypogonadism: A rare syndrome characterized by mental retardation, abnormal gonad functioning and a total lack of hair at birth. After childhood, sparse hair growth may occur.
  • Alopecia universalis: Complete loss of all body hair.
  • Alopecia, epilepsy, pyorrhea, mental subnormality: A rare syndrome characterized by alopecia, epilepsy, mental retardation and pus-producing gum and tooth inflammations.
  • Alpers Syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by liver disease, seizures and progressive, episodic psychomotor retardation.
  • Alpha-Mannosidosis: A rare condition which is characterized by a lysosomal storage defect.
  • Alpha-mannosidosis type II: A rare inherited metabolic disorder involving a deficiency of an enzyme (alpha-mannosidosase) which results in the accumulation of certain chemicals in the body which leads to progressive damage. This form of the condition is less severe than type I (infantile form).
  • Alpha-mannosidosis, adult-onset form:
  • Alport Syndrome: A rare hereditary disorder involving the progressive deterioration of parts of the kidney resulting in chronic kidney disease.
  • Alport syndrome with leukocyte inclusions and macrothrombocytopenia: A rare condition characterized by the presence of large blood platelets, kidney inflammation, deafness and abnormal leukocytes. End-stage kidney disease occurs in about a third of patients and tends to occur during the 3rd and 4th decades of life.
  • Alstrom disease: A rage genetic disorder involving a group of abnormalities affecting vision, hearing, kidney function and also characterized by obesity and diabetes mellitus.
  • Alstrom syndrome: A rare, hereditary genetic disorder which is progressive. Initial symptoms in infants are usually extreme light sensitivity, wobbling of the eyes and sometimes dilated dilated cardiomyopathy and congestive heart failure. Young children quickly gain weight and become obese and as they get older, multiple organ systems may be affected causing blindness, hearing loss, type 2 diabetes, heart failure, liver disease, urological dysfunction, pulmonary fibrosis and renal failure.
  • Alström Syndrome: A progressive condition which is characterized by deafness, obesity and visual problems in childhood that may lead to diabetes and kidney failure in adulthood
  • Alternating Hemiplegia: Episodes of one-sided paralysis.
  • Alveolar Hydatid Disease: Rare multi-organ tapeworm infection caught from animals.
  • Alveolar soft part sarcoma: A rare malignant tumor that occurs in soft connective tissues with an unknown origin. It is a very slow growing tumor which tends to metastasize to the lung and brain years after it is first diagnosed.
  • Alves Castelo dos Santos syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by hair, eye, skin and spinal abnormalities.
  • Amanita polypyramis poisoning: Amanita polypyramis is a type of large-capped mushroom often found growing in the wild in the US. The mushroom tends to give off a chlorine-like odor. It is poisonous and death can result if sufficient quantities are eaten.
  • Amastia, bilateral, with ureteral triplication and dysmorphism: A very rare disorder characterized mainly by the absence of both breasts, triplicated ureters (normally they are duplicated), facial anomalies and various other defects.
  • Amaurosis: Blindness particularly that which occurs without an apparent lesion of the eye
  • Amaurosis Congenita of Leber, type 12: A rare inherited retinal disease (retinal dystrophy) that usually starts during the fetal stage. Vision impairment is usually apparent at birth or within months of birth. Type 12 is distinguished from the other forms of this condition by the genetic origin of the defect - chromosome 1q32.3.
  • Amaurosis Congenita of Leber, type 13: A rare inherited retinal disease (retinal dystrophy) that usually starts during the fetal stage. Vision impairment is obvious usually by the age of 4 years. Type 13 is distinguished from the other forms of this condition by the genetic origin of the defect - chromosome 14q23.3, RDH12 gene.
  • Amaurosis congenita of Leber: A rare genetic eye disorder characterized by blindness at birth or within years as well as other eye abnormalities.
  • Amaurosis congenita of Leber, type 1: A rare inherited retinal disease (retinal dystrophy) that starts during the fetal stage. Vision impairment is obvious at birth or within months of birth. Type I is distinguished from the other forms of this condition by the genetic origin of the defect - chromosome 17p13.1, RETGC1 gene.
  • Amaurosis congenita of Leber, type 10: A rare inherited retinal disease (retinal dystrophy) that starts during the fetal stage. Vision impairment is obvious at birth or within months of birth. Type 10 is distinguished from the other forms of this condition by the genetic origin of the defect - chromosome 12, CEP290 gene.
  • Amaurosis congenita of Leber, type 11: A rare inherited retinal disease (retinal dystrophy) that starts during the fetal stage. Vision impairment is obvious at birth or within months of birth. Type 11 is distinguished from the other forms of this condition by the genetic origin of the defect - chromosome 7q, IMPDH1 gene.
  • Amaurosis congenita of Leber, type 2: A rare inherited retinal disease (retinal dystrophy) that starts during the fetal stage. Vision impairment is obvious at birth or within months of birth. Type 2 is distinguished from the other forms of this condition by the genetic origin of the defect - chromosome 1, RPE65 gene.
  • Amaurosis congenita of Leber, type 3: A rare inherited retinal disease (retinal dystrophy) that starts during the fetal stage. Vision impairment is obvious at birth or within months of birth. Type 3 is distinguished from the other forms of this condition by the genetic origin of the defect - chromosome 14q23.3, RDH12 gene.
  • Amaurosis congenita of Leber, type 4: A rare inherited retinal disease (retinal dystrophy) that starts during the fetal stage. Vision impairment is obvious at birth or within months of birth. Type 4 is distinguished from the other forms of this condition by the genetic origin of the defect - chromosome 17p13.1, AIPL1 gene.
  • Amaurosis congenita of Leber, type 5: A rare inherited retinal disease (retinal dystrophy) that starts during the fetal stage. Vision impairment is obvious at birth or within months of birth. Type 5 is distinguished from the other forms of this condition by the genetic origin of the defect - chromosome 6q11-q16.
  • Amaurosis congenita of Leber, type 6: A rare inherited retinal disease (retinal dystrophy) that usually starts during the fetal stage. Vision impairment is usually apparent at birth or within months of birth. Type 6 is distinguished from the other forms of this condition by the genetic origin of the defect - chromosome 14q11, RPGRIP1 gene.
  • Amaurosis congenita of Leber, type 7: A rare inherited retinal disease (retinal dystrophy) that usually starts during the fetal stage. Vision impairment is usually apparent at birth or within months of birth. Type 7 is distinguished from the other forms of this condition by the genetic origin of the defect - chromosome 19q13.3, CRX gene.
  • Amaurosis congenita of Leber, type 8: A rare inherited retinal disease (retinal dystrophy) that usually starts during the fetal stage. Vision impairment is usually apparent at birth or within months of birth. Type 8 is distinguished from the other forms of this condition by the genetic origin of the defect - chromosome 1q31-q32.1, CRB1 gene.
  • Amaurosis congenita of Leber, type 9: A rare inherited retinal disease (retinal dystrophy) that usually starts during the fetal stage. Vision impairment is usually apparent at birth or within months of birth. Type 9 is distinguished from the other forms of this condition by the genetic origin of the defect - chromosome 1p36, LCA9 gene.
  • Amaurosis hypertrichosis: A rare syndrome characterized by severe retinal dystrophy and excessive growth of hair.
  • Amelo-cerebro-hypohidrotic syndrome: A rare syndrome involving degeneration of the central nervous system, seizures and abnormal tooth development.
  • American mountain fever: A viral disease transmitted through the bite of ticks (Rocky Mountain wood tick and American dog tick) who are infected with the virus. Because the virus infects blood cells including erythrocytes, transmission can also occur through transfusion with infected blood but this is uncommon. Infection is most common in Canada and parts of western US. The incubation period usually lasts between 3 and 6 days but can be as long as a few weeks. The virus tends to cause to periods of fever each lasting for a few days.
  • Amiodarone -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Amiodarone during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Amitriptyline toxicity: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Amoxapine toxicity: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Amphetamine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Amphetamine during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Amphetamine abuse: Use of the stimulant drugs known as amphetamines or "speed"
  • Amphetamine-induced hypertension: Amphetamine-induced hypertension is high blood pressure caused by use of amphetamines. Patients with an existing history of hypertension may suffer further blood pressure increases while taking amphetamines and this can be serious. Severity of symptoms varies amongst patients depending on their susceptibility, underlying health and duration of amphetamine use.
  • Ampola syndrome: A rare genetic disease characterized primarily by mental retardation, facial anomalies, short stature, seizures and finger and toe abnormalities.
  • Amyloidosis of gingiva and conjunctiva mental retardation: A rare disorder characterized by mental retardation and abnormal amyloid deposits in the gums and conjunctiva of the eye.
  • Amyloidosis, familial cutaneous: Amyloidosis involves the abnormal deposit of a substance called amyloid in various parts of the body. The familial cutaneous form is characterized by brown skin pigmentation as well as systemic symptoms such as failure to thrive, developmental delay, gastrointestinal problems and pneumonia.
  • Amyloidosis, oculoleptomeningeal: Amyloidosis involves the abnormal deposit of a substance called amyloid in various parts of the body. In this particular type, the amyloid deposits in the leptomeningeal blood vessels, brainstem, spinal cord and eye causing central nervous system dysfunction, brain hemorrhages and vision impairment.
  • Amyopathic dermatomyositis: A rare disorder involving a skin rash that normally occurs with inflammation of skeletal muscles (dermatomyositis) but there is no muscle involvement. It is important to monitor patients in case muscle involvement develops.
  • Anaesthesia complications: Complications that occur due to anaesthesia
  • Anaphylaxis: An immediate hypersensitivity reaction due to the exposure of a specific antigen to a sensitized individual
  • Anchovy poisoning (clupeotoxin): Some anchovies contain toxins (Clupeotoxin) which can be poisonous to humans if eaten. Heat does not destroy the toxin and there is still uncertainty as to the origin of the toxin. The toxin appears to be present in higher concentrations in summer and is believed to be possible linked to the consumption of toxic food in its food web. The size and age of the anchovy does not appear to be related to the toxicity. The anchovies are found in coastal waters off Africa and the Caribbean, Indian and Pacific Oceans.
  • Andersen-Tawil syndrome: A rare disorder where a genetic mutation causes periods of muscle weakness, heart rhythm abnormalities and various physical development abnormalities. It is believed to be caused by problems with the way the body utilizes potassium.
  • Andogsky's syndrome: A condition characterized by chronic eczema-like skin lesions which develop during childhood and cataracts which develop in early adulthood. The main areas affected by the skin lesions are the neck, elbows and knees.
  • André syndrome: A rare fatal syndrome characterized mainly by bone calcification abnormalities and facial anomalies. Death usually occurs within weeks of birth.
  • Anemia: Reduced red blood cells in the blood
  • Anemia, Blackfan Diamond: Diamond-Blackfan anemia is a rare genetic condition where the bone marrow is unable to make sufficient red blood cells which leads low levels of red blood cells. There are eight subtypes of the condition which differ in the location of the genetic defect and the incidence of additional symptoms such as malformations. The severity of symptoms is variable but most cases are serious.
  • Anencephaly: A birth defect where large parts of the brain is missing and the brainstem is malformed.
  • Anesthetic agent-induced liver damage: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to anesthetic agents. Anesthetic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anesthetic agent-induced liver damage -- Chloroform: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anesthetic agent called chloroform. Anesthetic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anesthetic agent-induced liver damage -- Cyclopropane: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anesthetic agent called cyclopropane. Anesthetic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anesthetic agent-induced liver damage -- Ether: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anesthetic agent called ether. Anesthetic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anesthetic agent-induced liver damage -- Halothane: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anesthetic agent called halothane. Anesthetic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anesthetic agent-induced liver damage -- Methoxyflurane: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anesthetic agent called methoxyflurane. Anesthetic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anesthetic agent-induced liver damage -- Nitrous Oxide: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anesthetic agent called nitrous oxide. Anesthetic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are five different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases and individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry, 1: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are five different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases and individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms. Type 1 is caused by a defect on chromosome 7q11.2.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry, 10: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are five different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases and individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms. Type 10 is caused by a defect on chromosome 8q12.1.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry, 2: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are five different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases and individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms. Type 2 is caused by a defect on chromosome 19q13.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry, 3: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are five different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases and individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms. Type 3 is caused by a defect on chromosome 1p36.13-p34.3.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry, 4: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are five different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases and individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms. Type 4 is caused by a defect on chromosome 5p15.2-14.3.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry, 5: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are five different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases and individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms. Type 5 is caused by a defect on chromosome 2p13.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry, 6: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are now six different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases an individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms. Type 6 is caused by a defect on chromosome 9p21.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry, 7: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are five different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases and individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms. Type 7 is caused by a defect on chromosome 11q24-q25.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry, 8: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are five different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases and individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms. Type 8 is caused by a defect on chromosome 14q23.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry, 9: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are five different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases and individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms. Type 9 is caused by a defect on chromosome 2q33.1.
  • Aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage: Bleeding in the space around the brain that occurs from a leak in a weakened or dilated blood vessel under the arachnoid layer of the brain. Death can occur if treatment is not prompt.
  • Angelman syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by a puppet-like gait, fits of laughter and characteristic facial features.
  • Angelman-Like Syndrome, X-linked: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by mental retardation, mutism, facial anomalies, epilepsy and weak eye muscles. Males tended to have severe mental retardation whereas female carriers had mild or no mental retardation. Patients do eventually walk but then often lose this ability by the age of 10 years. Female carriers tend to have mild symptoms and males have severe symptoms - symptoms are variable to some degree.
  • Angelucci's syndrome: A rare disorder characterized by various symptoms associated with vernal (nonbacterial) conjunctivitis. The conjunctivitis tends to recur seasonally and is believed to have allergic origins.
  • Angioid streaks: Streaks that radiate out from the optic nerve head under the retina. The streaks may be red, brown or grey. The streaks resemble blood vessels and hence the term angioid. The streaks represent tiny breaks in the elastic membrane of the retina (Bruch's membrane). The anomaly is often associated with conditions such as Paget's disease, sickle cell anemia, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and pseudoxanthoma elasticum.
  • Angiostrongyliasis: Infection by a parasitic worm (Angiostrongylus). Infection can occur through eating contaminated raw animals such as snails, slugs, prawns or crabs which act as hosts to these parasites.
  • Animal allergy: An animal allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to animals such as cats. The allergy is usually associated with the skin, saliva or urine of the animal. Animals frequently lick themselves which results in saliva sticking to the fur. Thus a person allergic to animals will often react to the fur even if it is not attached to the animal. Frequent washing of the animal may reduce symptoms. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients e.g. skin and respiratory symptoms.
  • Aniridia: A genetic disorder where part or all of the iris of one or both eyes is missing. The iris is the colored part of the eye. There are four forms of the disease: AN-1, AN-II, AN-III and AN-IV.
  • Aniridia -- absent patella: A rare genetic condition characterized by an abnormal or missing kneecap as well as the absence of the iris of the eye.
  • Aniridia -- mental retardation syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized by mental retardation and absent irises.
  • Aniridia -- ptosis -- mental retardation -- obesity, familial: A rare familial disorder characterized by eye abnormalities, mental retardation and obesity.
  • Aniridia -- renal agenesis -- psychomotor retardation: A rare genetic disorder characterized by missing irises of the eye, kidney developmental problems and mental retardation.
  • Aniridia I: A genetic disorder where part or all of the iris (except for the stump) of one or both eyes is missing. The iris is the colored part of the eye. There are four forms of the disease: AN-1, AN-II, AN-III and AN-IV.
  • Aniridia II: A genetic disorder where part or all of the iris of one or both eyes is missing. The iris is the colored part of the eye. There are four forms of the disease: AN-1, AN-II, AN-III and AN-IV. AN-II is often associated with other eye problems such as glaucoma and nystagmus.
  • Aniridia III: A genetic disorder where part or all of the iris of one or both eyes is missing. The iris is the colored part of the eye. There are four forms of the disease: AN-1, AN-II, AN-III and AN-IV. AN-III is associated with mental retardation.
  • Aniridia ptosis mental retardation obesity familial type: A rare familial disorder characterized by eye abnormalities, mental retardation and obesity.
  • Aniridia, sporadic: A rare eye malformation where part or all of the iris of the eye is missing at birth.
  • Aniridia, type 2:
  • Aniscoria: Unequal size of pupils.
  • Anisocoria: Anisocoria is unequal pupil size.
  • Anisometropia: This is where there is an inequality in refractive power of the two eyes
  • Ankylosing spondylarthritis: Inflammation of one or more spine joints. The spine becomes progressively painful and stiff and the spine joints may eventually fuse and cause disability. The condition may vary from mild to severe. Inflammation can affect other joints and tissues.
  • Ankylosis -- facial anomalies -- pulmonary hypoplasia syndrome: A rare familial syndrome characterized mainly by fused or stiff joints, facial anomalies and underdeveloped lungs.
  • Anodontia and strabismus: A rare, dominantly inherited syndrome characterized by the association of strabismus and lack of teeth.
  • Anophthalmia -- Microphthalmia, isolated: A rare disorder where absent or small eyes are not associated with any other abnormalities.
  • Anophthalmia -- hypothalamo-pituitary insufficiency: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by small or absent eyes and malformations of the hypothalamus and pituitary gland.
  • Anophthalmia -- hypyothalamo-pituitary insufficiency: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by small or absent eyes and malformations of the hypothalamus and pituitary gland.
  • Anophthalmia -- megalocornea -- cardiopathy -- skeletal anomalies: A rare genetic syndrome characterized by absent or very small eyes, large corneas, congenital heart defects and skeletal abnormalities.
  • Anophthalmia -- short stature -- obesity: A very rare syndrome characterized by absent eyes, short stature and obesity.
  • Anophthalmia plus syndrome: An extremely rare disorder characterized by absent or very small eyes, underdeveloped ears and other facial anomalies.
  • Anophthalmia with pulmonary hypoplasia: A rare disorder characterized by absent or very small eyes and underdeveloped lung tissue.
  • Anophthalmia/microphthalmia -- esophageal atresia: A rare disorder characterized by esophageal and genital defects as well as absent or very small eyes.
  • Anophthalmos with limb anomalies: A rare disorder characterized by absent eyes
  • Ansell-Bywaters-Elderking syndrome: A rare familial syndrome characterized mainly by mental retardation, rash, eye inflammation and joint disease.
  • Antepartum Eclampsia: Antepartum eclampsia is the development of seizures or coma in pregnant women suffering from high blood pressure. Antepartum means that it occurs before delivery. Eclampsia is a serious condition which requires urgent medical treatment. Eclampsia may be associated with moderate as well as significant increases in blood pressure. The blood pressure can return to normal after delivery or may persist for a period of time.
  • Anterior polar cataract 2: A rare, dominantly inherited type of cataract which is characterized by small opacities on the front surface of the eye lens. Vision is usually not affected and the cataract is not associated with any other abnormalities. Type 1 is caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 17p13.
  • Anterior segment mesenchymal dysgenesis: An eye disorder caused by a genetic anomaly. The degree of vision impairment various with the severity of the condition.
  • Anthurium poisoning: Anthuriums have dark, glossy, heart-shaped leaves with glossy, heart-shaped flowers which can be red, white or other colors. The plant contains calcium oxalate crystals which an cause severe mouth pain if eaten. Large amounts would need to be eaten to cause poisoning. Eye and skin irritation can also occur on exposure to the plant.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage: Damage or injury to the liver caused by taking certain antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Cephalosporin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Cephalosporin antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Chloramphenicol: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antibiotic called Chloramphenicol. Chloramphenicol a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Clindamycin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Clindamycin antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Erythromycin Ethyl succinate: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Erythromycin Ethyl succinate antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Erythromycin estolate: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure Erythromycin estolate antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Nitrofuran: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Nitrofuran antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Novobiocin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Novobiocin antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Penicillin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Penicillin antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Quinolone: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Quinolone antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Rifampicin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Rifampicin antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Spectinomycin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Spectinomycin antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Sulfones: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to sulfone antiboitics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Telithromycin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Telithromycin antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage -- Tetracycline: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Tetracycline antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anticholinergic syndrome: Symptoms caused by overdose of anticholinergic drugs.
  • Anticonvulsive-induced liver damage: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to anticonvulsives. Anticonvulsives are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anticonvulsive-induced liver damage -- Mephenytoin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anticonvulsive called mephenytoin. Anticonvulsives are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anticonvulsive-induced liver damage -- Phenobarbital: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anticonvulsive called phenobarbital. Anticonvulsives are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anticonvulsive-induced liver damage -- Phenytoin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anticonvulsive called Phenytoin. Anticonvulsives are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anticonvulsive-induced liver damage -- Valproic Acid: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anticonvulsive called valproic acid. Anticonvulsives are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antifungal agent-induced liver damage: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to antifungal agents. Antifungal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antifungal agent-induced liver damage -- 5-Fluorocytosine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antifungal agent called 5-Fluorocytosine. Antifungal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antifungal agent-induced liver damage -- Amphotericin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antifungal agent called Amphotericin. Antifungal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antifungal agent-induced liver damage -- Griseofulvin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antifungal agent called Griseofulvin. Antifungal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antifungal agent-induced liver damage -- Ketoconazole: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antifungal agent called Ketoconazole. Antifungal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antifungal agent-induced liver damage -- Saramycetin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antifungal agent called Saramycetin. Antifungal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antihypertensive drug allergy: Taking antihypertensive drugs (blood pressure-lowering drugs) can cause an allergic response in some people however this is considered rare. It involves the body's immune system overreacting to the drug. The type and severity of symptoms can vary considerable though skin symptoms are the most common allergic response to drugs.
  • Antimetazoal agent-induced liver damage: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Antimetazoal agents. Antimetazoal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antimetazoal agent-induced liver damage -- Amodiaquine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antimetazoal agent called amodiaquine. Antimetazoal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antimetazoal agent-induced liver damage -- Hycanthone: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiprotozoal agent called hycanthone. Antimetazoal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antimongoloid palpebral fissure in children:
  • Antiprotozoal agent-induced liver damage: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to antiprotozoal agents. Antiprotozoal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiprotozoal agent-induced liver damage -- 8-Hydroxyquinolone: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiprotozoal agent called 8-Hydroxyquinolone. Antiprotozoal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiprotozoal agent-induced liver damage -- Carbarsone: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiprotozoal agent called carbarsone. Antiprotozoal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiprotozoal agent-induced liver damage -- Emetine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiprotozoal agent called emetine. Antiprotozoal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiprotozoal agent-induced liver damage -- Mepacrine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiprotozoal agent called mepacrine. Antiprotozoal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiprotozoal agent-induced liver damage -- Metronidazole: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiprotozoal agent called Metronidazole. Antiprotozoal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiprotozoal agent-induced liver damage -- Thiabendazole: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiprotozoal agent called Thiabendazole. Antiprotozoal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antithrombin Deficiency: Antithrombin deficiency refers the deficiency or impaired activity of a substance that inactivates enzymes involved in blood coagulation. Antithrombin prevents the blood from clotting too readily and if its activity is impaired then the blood becomes more prone to clotting which can result in severe problems. Severity of the condition can vary amongst patients and the symptoms can vary considerably depending on the location of blood clots and size of the blood clot.
  • Antithrombin Deficiency, type I: Type I Antithrombin deficiency refers the deficiency of a substance that inactivates enzymes involved in blood coagulation. Antithrombin prevents the blood from clotting too readily and if there are insufficient quantities of it then the blood becomes more prone to clotting which can result in severe problems. Severity of the condition can vary amongst patients and the symptoms can vary considerably depending on the location of blood clots and size of the blood clot. Type I may be inherited or acquired through such things as kidney or liver disease. Acquired cases tend to have a lower risk of blood clots compared to inherited cases.
  • Antithrombin Deficiency, type II: Type II Antithrombin deficiency refers the malfunction of a substance that inactivates enzymes involved in blood coagulation. Antithrombin prevents the blood from clotting too readily and if it is unable to function properly then the blood becomes more prone to clotting which can result in severe problems. Severity of the condition can vary amongst patients and the symptoms can vary considerably depending on the location of blood clots and size of the blood clot. Type II is an inherited condition.
  • Antituberculous agent-induced liver damage: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to antituberculous agents. Antituberculous agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antituberculous agent-induced liver damage -- Cycloserine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antituberculous agent called cycloserine. Antituberculous agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antituberculous agent-induced liver damage -- Ethionamide: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antituberculous agent called ethionamide. Antituberculous agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antituberculous agent-induced liver damage -- Isoniazid: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antituberculous agent called isoniazid. Antituberculous agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antituberculous agent-induced liver damage -- Rifampicin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antituberculous agent called rifampicin. Antituberculous agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antituberculous agent-induced liver damage -- p-aminosalicylic acid: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antituberculous agent called p-aminosalicylic acid. Antituberculous agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiviral agent-induced liver damage: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to antiviral agents. Antiviral agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiviral agent-induced liver damage -- Cytarabine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiviral agent called cytarabine. Antiviral agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiviral agent-induced liver damage -- Vidarabine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiviral agent called vidarabine. Antiviral agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiviral agent-induced liver damage -- idoxuridine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiviral agent called idoxuridine. Antiviral agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiviral agent-induced liver damage -- xenylamine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiviral agent called xenylamine. Antiviral agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anxiety, separation: A term used when children become upset when they are separated from a parent or carer. The situation is most commonly witnessed when children are taken to day care. Other situations include when the child is left with a baby sitter or made to sleep on his/her own. It is a normal condition during childhood.
  • Anxiety-tension syndrome: Anxiety associated with physical symptoms such as tense muscles and fatigue.
  • Aortic stenosis: A condition which affects the aortic valve of the heart resulting in stenosis of the valve.
  • Aortic supravalvular stenosis: A rare congenital condition involving increased intestinal calcium absorption and characterized by development delay, distinctive facial features, small nails and short stature.
  • Apelt-Gerkin-Lenz Syndrome: A rare inherited syndrome characterized by clefting of the lip and palate as well as the absence of variable portions of all of the limbs.
  • Apert syndrome: A rare condition characterized by abnormalities in the appearance of the face and head as well as finger and toe abnormalities. The bones of the skull fuse together too early which prevents it from growing normally. Various toes and fingers may be fused together.
  • Aphakia: Absence of the lens of the eye - often due to cataract treatment. Also called aphacia.
  • Aplasia cutis congenita -- epibulbar dermoids: A very rare syndrome characterized by increased skin pigmentation, a localized absence of skin (aplasia cutis congenital) and epibulbar dermoids (a benign eye tumor).
  • Aplasia cutis congenital -- intestinal lymphangiectasia: A rare disorder characterized by a skin defect and dilated intestinal lymph vessels.
  • Aplasia cutis myopia: A very rare syndrome characterized by a skin defect (localized absence of skin at birth) and nearsightedness and other eye anomalies.
  • Arachnodactyly -- ataxia -- cataract -- aminoaciduria -- mental retardation: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by congenital cataracts, ataxia, mental retardation, abnormal amino acid metabolism and long, thin fingers.
  • Arachnoid Cysts: A rare disorder involving a fluid-filled cysts on the arachnoid membrane which is one of the thin layers of tissue that form a membrane which covers the spinal cord and brain. The type and severity of symptoms is determined by the size and location of the cyst.
  • Arachnoiditis: A progressive disorder where the arachnoid membrane becomes inflamed and the brain and spinal cord may also become inflamed.
  • Aralia poisoning: Aralia is an evergreen shrub which produces clusters of small white flowers. The plant originated in Asia and Africa. The plant contains a toxic chemical called saponic glycoside and can cause skin irritation if skin contact occurs or other symptoms if eaten. The plant is considered to have a relatively low toxicity.
  • Arctic bearded seal poisoning: The Arctic Bearded seal is often used as a food source by the arctic inhabitants. Eating the liver and kidneys of the arctic bearded seal can result in a Vitamin A overdose which can cause serious symptoms and even death in extreme cases. It is believed that eating more than 100-250 grams of the seal liver can result in human death.
  • Area of partial or complete blindness: area or island of loss or impairment of visual acuity surrounded by a field of normal or relatively well-preserved vision.
  • Area of partial or complete blindness in both eyes: An area of partial or complete blindness in both eyes is the lack or loss of all or part of the ability to see normally in both eyes.
  • Areolar atrophy of the macula: An eye disorder involving degeneration of part of the macula. The impact on vision depends on the location of the lesion rather than the size of the lesion.
  • Argyll Robertson pupil: pupils that constrict when the patient focuses on to a nearby object but does not constrict when exposed to bright light
  • Argyll Robertson pupil in both eyes: Argyll Robertson pupil in both eyes is a condition in which the pupils of both eyes constrict when a person focuses on a near object but do not constrict normally when exposed to bright light.
  • Argyll Robertson pupil in one eye: Argyll Robertson pupil in one eye refers to a condition in which the pupil of one eye constricts when a person focuses on a near object but does not constrict normally when exposed to bright light.
  • Argyll-Robertson syndrome: An eye disorder where the pupils can respond to changes in distance (accommodation) but not to light. The pupil doesn't respond normally to light changes (dilate or constrict). One or both eyes may be involved. The condition is often associated with syphilis that involves the nerves but may also occur in conditions such as multiple sclerosis, virus infections and heredodegenerative conditions.
  • Arhinia, choanal atresia, and microphthalmia: A very rare syndrome characterized by small eyes, choanal atresia (blocked nasal passages) and arhinia (absence of nose and parts of the olefactory system).
  • Arhinia-choanal atresia-microphthalmia syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized by small eyes, choanal atresia (blocked nasal passages) and arhinia (absence of nose and parts of the olefactory system).
  • Arima syndrome: A rare disorder characterized mainly by eye and brain abnormalities.
  • Arizona Bark Scorpion poisoning: A bite from the Arizona Bark scorpion contains chemicals toxic to the nerve system and can cause serious, life-threatening symptoms.
  • Armendares syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by retarded growth and facial, skull and eye abnormalities.
  • Arnold Stickler Bourne syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized by muscle problems in hands, mouth and pharynx, kidney anomalies and corneal crystals.
  • Arnold-Chiari Malformation (Type 1): A rare malformation where the base of the brain enters into the upper spinal canal.
  • Arnold-Chiari malformation type 2: A rare malformation where the base of the brain enters into the upper spinal canal. The extent of the deformity is greater in type 2 than type 1 and hence the symptoms are more severe and are often associated with a myelomeningocele (opening of the spine and spinal cord).
  • Arnold-Chiari malformation type 3: An extremely rare malformation where the base of the brain enters into the upper spinal canal. Type 3 involves the herniation of brain or brain stem tissue out of the back of the neck or head. The condition generally has a poor prognosis.
  • Arnold-Chiari malformation type 4: Arnold-Chiari malformation is a rare malformation where the base of the brain enters into the upper spinal canal. Type 4 actually involves a lack of development of a portion of the base of the brain (cerebellum). The prognosis is very poor with death often occurring during infancy.
  • Aromatic amino acid decarboxylase deficiency: A rare inborn error of metabolism involving the deficiency of an enzyme (aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase) needed to process aromatic amino acids. This results in a deficiency of neurotransmitters such as dopamine and serotonin. The condition manifests as movement and neurological problems.
  • Arteriovenous Malformation: Birth defect of a tangle of veins and arteries.
  • Arthritis -- short stature -- deafness: A very rare syndrome characterized by arthritis, short stature, deafness and numerous other abnormalities.
  • Arthrogryposis -- epileptic seizures -- migrational brain disorder: A rare disorder characterized by congenital joint contractures, epileptic seizures and brain development abnormalities. It can be caused by fetal exposure to alcohol or chemical products.
  • Arthrogryposis -- ophthalmoplegia -- retinopathy: A very rare syndrome characterized by congenital contractures of the hands and feet as well as eye problems.
  • Arthrogryposis -- spinal muscular atrophy: A group of inherited motor neuron diseases involving progressive muscle weakness and wasting due to degeneration of motor neurons in the spinal cord. Joint contractures are also present at birth.
  • Arthrogryposis distal type II: A very rare syndrome characterized by permanent flexion of the fingers as well as other birth defects.
  • Arthrogryposis due to muscular dystrophy: A rare disorder where a non-progressive muscle disease results in the presence of multiple joint contractures at birth.
  • Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita -- pulmonary hypoplasia: A rare congenital syndrome involving degeneration of the brain and spinal cord and characterized by facial, head, skeletal and muscular abnormalities. Reduced fetal activity causes many of the problems.
  • Arthrogryposis, distal, type 2A: A form of distal arthrogryposis (joint contractures in ends of limbs) that involves additional symptoms such as facial and spinal anomalies.
  • Ascher syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by the association of droopy eyelids, double lip and goiter.
  • Ascher's Syndrome:
  • Ashley syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by an unusual facial appearance and muscle and skeletal abnormalities.
  • Asiatic porpoise poisoning: The Asiatic porpoise is eaten mainly in China. Eating the liver, internal organs and muscle tissue of the Asiatic porpoise can cause poisoning symptoms in humans if sufficient quantities are consumed. The nature of the toxin is unknown but it is believed that some cases result from very high levels of vitamin A in the liver.
  • Aspartylglucosaminidase deficiency: A rare glycoprotein metabolism disorder caused by a deficiency of an enzyme called aspartylglucosaminidase. Patients tend to develop normally during the first few years of life and development continues slowly until adolescence when mental retardation becomes progressively worse.
  • Aspartylglucosaminuria: A rare glycoprotein metabolism disorder caused by a deficiency of an enzyme called aspartylglucosaminidase. Patients tend to develop normally during the first few years of life and development continues slowly until adolescence when mental retardation becomes progressively worse.
  • Aspartylglycosaminuria: A rare glycoprotein metabolism disorder caused by a deficiency of an enzyme called aspartylglucosaminidase. Patients tend to develop normally during the first few years of life and development continues slowly until adolescence when mental retardation becomes progressively worse.
  • Asphyxiating Thoracic Dystrophy: A rare genetic disorder characterized by short limbs, underdeveloped iliac wings and a narrow rigid thoracic cage that often results in asphyxiation.
  • Asthenopia: Asthenopia or eye strain refers to general eye symptoms such as vision blurring, eye pain, eye weakness, eye fatigue and headaches which can result from overuse of the eyes or uncorrected vision problems.
  • Astigmatism: A condition which is characterized by ametropia caused by differences in the curvature of the refractive surfaces of the eye
  • Ataxia -- hypogonadism -- choroidal dystrophy: A very rare disorder characterized by spinocerebellar ataxia, eye abnormalities and a failure of the pituitary to stimulate gonadal development during puberty.
  • Ataxia Telangiectasia: A rare inherited childhood disorder involving progressive degeneration of the nervous system.
  • Ataxia spastic congenital miosis: A rare, dominantly inherited disorder characterized mainly by ataxia, spasticity and small pupils that respond poorly to light.
  • Ataxia tapetoretinal degeneration: Conditions involving incoordination and an eye anomaly.
  • Ataxia, Hereditary, Autosomal Dominant: A group of rare, dominantly inherited neuromuscular disorder involving degeneration of the brain and spinal cord. The range, progression and severity of symptoms can vary quite considerably depending on the genetic defect involved.
  • Ataxia, episodic -- vertigo -- tinnitus -- myokymia: A rare genetic disorder characterized by episodes of incoordination and unsteadiness as well as tinnitus and vertigo. Stress, exhaustion, sudden movements and exertion may trigger the episodes. It is caused by a defect on chromosome 1q42.
  • Ataxia, spastic with congenital miosis: A rare disorder characterized by movement problems of the limbs as well as an impaired pupil reaction to light (miosis).
  • Atelosteogenesis Type III: A very rare inherited skeletal ossification disorder. Unlike types I and II, survival past infancy is possible in type III.
  • Athabaskan severe combined immunodeficiency: A severe immunodeficiency disorder found in Navajo and Apache populations.
  • Athyrotic hypothyroidism sequence: A rare congenital disorder characterized by a thyroid gland defect.
  • Atkin-Flatiz syndrome: A rare, X-linked syndrome characterized mainly by mental retardation and facial anomalies.
  • Atrophia aerata: A rare, inherited, slow progressing eye disease.
  • Attacks of crying: bouts of crying
  • Aughton syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized primarily by small eyes, cleft palate, mental retardation and dextrocardia (heart located on right side of chest instead of left).
  • Aural atresia -- multiple congenital anomalies -- mental retardation: A rare syndrome characterized by a number of malformations as well as mental retardation.
  • Aureobasidium exposure: Aureobasidium is a type of fungus which is capable of causing a variety of diseases in humans. The fungus is most often found in damp places either inside the home or in the environment. It is often pinkish or blackish. It is a rare cause of disease and is more likely to occur in immunosuppressed patients. It can cause infection in just about any part of the body depending on the nature of the exposure (inhalation, wound, ingestion etc.) and as such the type and severity of symptoms can vary considerably.
  • Auricular abnormalities -- cleft lip with or without cleft palate -- ocular abnormalities: A rare syndrome characterized by the association of external ear and eye abnormalities, cleft lip and sometimes a cleft palate.
  • Auriculoocular anomalies -- cleft lip: A very rare syndrome characterized by the association of abnormal external ears and a cleft lip and sometimes a cleft palate. Only two cases of the condition has been reported.
  • Australian Sea Lion poisoning: The Australian Sea Lion is sometimes used as a food source and is found in the South-Southwest waters of Australia. Eating the liver of the Australian Sea Lion can result in a Vitamin A overdose which can cause serious symptoms and even death in extreme cases.
  • Austrian syndrome: A condition where alcoholism is associated with heart failure and pneumococcal meningitis.
  • Autistic conditions: Medical conditions related to autism or autism spectrum disorders.
  • Autoimmune Diseases of the Nervous System: A group of diseases where the body's immune system attacks it's own nervous system. Examples includes opsoclonus myoclonus syndrome, Guillain-Barre syndrome and multiple sclerosis. Symptoms vary depending on which nerves are involved.
  • Autoimmune Hypophysitis: Inflammation of part of the pituitary gland due to an autoimmune process resulting in impaired pituitary hormone production. The range and severity of symptoms is variable depending on the degree of damage to the pituitary gland.
  • Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome: An inherited autoimmune condition characterized by proliferation of lymphocytes and autoimmunity against the body's own blood cells resulting in premature death of certain blood cells.
  • Autoimmune eye diseases: Eye disease that is caused by an autoimmune disease
  • Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy syndrome, type 1: A very rare autoimmune disorder characterized by autoimmune polyendocrinopathy (APE), candidiasis (C) and ectodermal dysplasia (ED).
  • Autoimmune thyroid diseases: Autoimmune diseases of the thyroid gland.
  • Autoimmune uveitis: Autoimmune inflammation of the eye's uvea.
  • Autonomic dysreflexia: Autonomic dysreflexia is a condition characterized by instability of the autonomic nervous system and often results in sudden high blood pressure.
  • Autosomal Recessive Tetra-Amelia: A rare disorder characterized by the absence of all four extremities as well as skeletal, nervous system, craniofacial and other abnormalities. The condition is causes death before or soon after birth.
  • Autosomal recessive nonsyndromic congenital nuclear cataract: A rare recessively inherited type of congenital cataract that is not associated with any other abnormality.
  • Avitaminosis: A group of diseases caused by the deficiency of one or more vitamins e.g. Beriberi (thiamine deficiency), rickets (Vitamin D deficiency), pellagra (niacin deficiency), pernicious anemia (Vitamin B12), bleeding (vitamin K deficiency) and night blindness (avitaminosis A). Symptoms depend on the type and degree of vitamin deficiency. Lack of various vitamins can affect just about every part of the body including the nervous system.
  • Axenfeld-Rieger anomaly -- hydrocephaly -- skeletal abnormalities: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by skeletal abnormalities, excess fluid inside the skull and eye anomalies.
  • Axenfeld-Rieger anomaly with cardiac defects and sensorineural hearing loss: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by heart defects, hearing impairment and a congenital eye disorder called Axenfeld-Rieger anomaly.
  • Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by underdeveloped or absent teeth and craniofacial and eye abnormalities. The range of symptoms that can occur is somewhat variable.
  • Axenfeld-Schürenberg syndrome: A congenital disorder where paralysis of the third cranial nerve controlling eye movement results in periods of eye paralysis alternating with periods of eye spasms.
  • Axial mesodermal dysplasia spectrum: A variable range of defects that occur during fetal development. The defect occurs at a cellular level and affects the way various parts of the body develop.
  • Ayazi syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized by choroideremia (a degenerative disease of the retina), deafness and obesity.
  • Azalea poisoning: Bacillus cereus is a bacterium that can cause food poisoning symptoms such as vomiting and diarrhea. There are two types: Type I causes mainly vomiting and is associated with fried rice whereas type II causes mainly diarrhea and is associated with meats, cereals, vegetables and milk.
  • Azarcon-induced lead poisoning: Azarcon is a lead-containing tetraoxide salt used mainly by Mexican people to treat digestive or stomach problems including indigestion and diarrhea. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • BBB syndrome, X-linked: A rare genetic disorder characterized by defects along the midline of the body. The type and severity of symptoms can vary considerably. There are two subtypes of the disorder: type I is inherited in a X-linked manner and type II is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner. Females with type I tend to have few if any symptoms - often the only symptom is wide-set eyes.
  • BOR-Duane hydrocephalus contiguous gene syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized primarily by an eye movement disorder (Duane syndrome), abnormal trapezius muscle (runs from neck to shoulder), hydrocephalus and BOR syndrome (branchio-oto-renal syndrome with branchial, eye and kidney abnormalities).
  • Ba Bow Sen-induced lead poisoning: Ba Bow Sen is a folk remedy used mainly by Chinese people to treat childhood hyperactivity and to alleviate nightmares. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Babinski-Nageotte syndrome: A rare disorder caused by damage to a part of the brain (medullobulbar transitional area) which causes a variety of neurological symptoms, some of which affect only one side of the body.
  • Baby's breath poisoning: Baby's breath is a perennial plant which bears many small pink or white flowers. The plant originated in Europe. Skin contact with the plant can cause minor skin irritation but the plant can also cause eye, nose and respiratory system irritation.
  • Back tumour: The presence of tumour growth in the vertebra, whether due to primary malignancies e.g. leukaemic or myeloma infiltration of the bone marrow, or due to secondary metastases from another site e.g. lung or breast.
  • Bacterial conjunctivitis: Infection and inflammation of the conjunctiva caused by bacteria.
  • Bacterial corneal ulcer: they occur due to breach in the corneal epithelium
  • Bacterial corneal ulcer of both eyes: Bacterial corneal ulcer of both eyes refers to a lesion on the cornea of the eye due to a bacterial infection.
  • Bacterial corneal ulcer of one eye: Bacterial corneal ulcer of one eye is a condition in which one eye has a lesion on the cornea due to a bacterial infection.
  • Bacterial meningitis: Bacterial meningitis is a form of meningitis caused by bacteria that normally lives in the mouth and throat. When the immune system is unable to supress this bacteria, it travels to the cerebrospinal spinal fluid in the brain. From there it affects the membranes surrounding the brain.
  • Bacterial toxic-shock syndrome: A very rare, potentially fatal infection caused by toxins produced by bacteria, especially bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus or Streptococcus pyogenes. The condition is often associated with tampon use but can originate from other sources.
  • Bagatelle-Cassidy syndrome: An extremely rare syndrome characterized by a large head, widely spaced eyes, hearing loss, short limbs and developmental delay.
  • Balance symptoms: Problems with balance or vertigo
  • Bali goli-induced lead poisoning: Bali goli (flat black bean) is a folk remedy used mainly by Indian and Asian people to treat intestinal problems. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Balsam apple poisoning: The Balsam apple is a climbing vine which produces yellowish fruit. The fruit contains toxins - resin, saponic glycoside and alkaloids - which can cause various symptoms if eaten. Large amounts of the fruit or seeds to be consumed to cause toxicity. The leaves of the plant may be cooked, drained and eaten safely.
  • Balsam pear poisoning: The Balsam pear is a climbing vine which produces yellowish fruit. The fruit contains toxins - resin, saponic glycoside and alkaloids - which can cause various symptoms if eaten. Large amounts of the fruit or seeds to be consumed to cause toxicity. The leaves of the plant may be cooked, drained and eaten safely.
  • Baltic myoclonic epilepsy: A rare inherited type of progressive myoclonus epilepsy which tends to cause symptoms during childhood. The involuntary muscle movements tend to occur more frequently and become more severe with increasing age. Symptoms may occur following various stimuli such as light, stress or exercise.
  • Baneberry poisoning: Baneberries are toxic and can cause a skin reaction on contact or various poisoning symptoms.
  • Bannayan-Zonana syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by macrocephaly, intestinal polyposis, pigmentation of penis and benign tumor-like growths.
  • Baraitser-Winter syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by a structural eye defect, droopy eyelids and mental retardation.
  • Barber-Say syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized primarily by excessive hair growth, skin anomaly, large mouth and outward turned eyelids (ectropion).
  • Barbiturate abuse: Abuse of barbiturate medications
  • Bardet-Biedl Syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by mental retardation, obesity, polydactyly and retinal pigmentation as well as other abnormalities.
  • Bardet-Biedl syndrome, type 1: A rare genetic disorder characterized by mental retardation, obesity, polydactyly and retinal pigmentation as well as other abnormalities. Type 1 is caused by a defect in chromosome 11q13.
  • Bardet-Biedl syndrome, type 10: A rare genetic disorder characterized by mental retardation, obesity, polydactyly and retinal pigmentation as well as other abnormalities. Type 10 is caused by a defect in chromosome 12q.
  • Bardet-Biedl syndrome, type 11: A rare genetic disorder characterized by mental retardation, obesity, polydactyly and retinal pigmentation as well as other abnormalities. Type 11 is caused by a defect in chromosome 9q33.1.

Conditions listing medical symptoms: Eye symptoms:

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Conditions listing medical complications: Eye symptoms:

The following list of medical conditions have 'Eye symptoms' or similar listed as a medical complication in our database.

 

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