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Symptoms » Fetal death » Glossary
 

Glossary for Fetal death

Medical terms related to Fetal death or mentioned in this section include:

  • ACE Inhibitors -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that the use of ACE Inhibitors during pregnancy may cause a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Abruptio placentae: A condition which is characterized by the premature detachment of the placenta from the uterus
  • Achondrogenesis: A type of dwarfism where the main limbs are short and the head and trunk are hydropic (contain an accumulation of clear fluid).
  • Achondrogenesis type 1A: A rare genetic disorder characterized by abnormal cartilage formation and growth of bones. Type 1A differs from other types by the origin of the genetic defect. Type 1A involves abnormal cartilage-forming cells (chondrocytes) whereas type 1B involves an abnormal cartilage matrix. Type 1B is the most severe disorder.
  • Achondrogenesis type 1B: A rare lethal genetic disorder characterized by a low nasal bridge, very short limbs and incomplete bone formation of lower spine.
  • Alpha thalassemia: Thalassemia is an inherited blood disorder characterized by abnormal synthesis of hemoglobin. Hemoglobin consists of two main protein chains called alpha and beta. Alpha thalassemia involves defects in one or more of the four genes required to make each ? protein chain. The main symptom is anemia, the severity of which can vary amongst patients depending on how many defective genes are involved.
  • Alpha-Mannosidosis: A rare condition which is characterized by a lysosomal storage defect.
  • Amelia, autosomal recessive: A rare disorder characterized by the complete absence of the arms and a partial absence of the legs. The disorder has been described in the 3 fetuses of one family.
  • Amniotic Bands: A rare condition where abnormal fetal development occurs when bands of tissue encircle parts of the fetus and affect the growth of that portion. The band of tissue develops from the internal womb lining. The location of the band on the fetus determines the symptoms and the seriousness of the condition.
  • Anemia of pregnancy: Anemia of pregnancy is anemia that occurs during pregnancy. Women's bodies have a greater demand for iron during pregnancy and if intake is not sufficient, anemia can result. Anemia in pregnant women can lead to infant problems such as premature birth, fetal death, retarded growth and other problems.
  • Anencephaly and spina bifida X-linked: A severe X-linked malformation syndrome involving anencephaly where a part or all of the brain and associated skull is missing as well as a defect or opening in the spinal column.
  • Anophthalmia -- hypothalamo-pituitary insufficiency: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by small or absent eyes and malformations of the hypothalamus and pituitary gland.
  • Anophthalmia -- hypyothalamo-pituitary insufficiency: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by small or absent eyes and malformations of the hypothalamus and pituitary gland.
  • Anorectal atresia: Congenital malformation where the anal or rectal opening is obstructed. The malformation is often associated with other abnormalities.
  • Antepartum Eclampsia: Antepartum eclampsia is the development of seizures or coma in pregnant women suffering from high blood pressure. Antepartum means that it occurs before delivery. Eclampsia is a serious condition which requires urgent medical treatment. Eclampsia may be associated with moderate as well as significant increases in blood pressure. The blood pressure can return to normal after delivery or may persist for a period of time.
  • Antiphospholipid syndrome: An autoimmune disorder characterized by blood clots and pregnancy losses.
  • Aorto-ventricular tunnel: A rare heart defect where a tunnel from between the ascending aorta and the cavity of the left or sometimes right heart ventricle. The severity of the condition is highly variable from asymptomatic for many years to fetal death. Often other heart anomalies are also associated.
  • Arthrogryposis due to muscular dystrophy: A rare disorder where a non-progressive muscle disease results in the presence of multiple joint contractures at birth.
  • Atelosteogenesis, type 1: A rare genetic disorder characterized by bone formation abnormalities, short stature and early death.
  • Atelosteogenesis, type 2: A very rare inherited skeletal disorder involving the bone and cartilage and resulting in various bone abnormalities.
  • Atresia of urethra: A rare congenital malformation where the urethra ends blindly which makes it unuseable by the body to eliminate urine. This usually results in death unless surgical intervention provides alternative communication between the bladder and the amniotic sac. In rare cases, there is an abnormal opening between the bladder and the rectum which allow the urine to drain. The inability of the fluid to pass out of the body of the fetus results in a reduced amount of amniotic fluid which in turn affects the development of the lungs.
  • Bilateral renal agenesis dominant type: A rare birth defect where both kidneys are absent. The disorder results in death within days of birth.
  • Birth symptoms: Symptoms related to childbirth.
  • Bloom Syndrome: A rare genetic inherited genetic disorder which mainly affects Ashkenazic Jewish people and is characterized by short stature, malar hypoplasia, and a telangiectatic erythema of the face.
  • Cardioencephalomyopathy fatal infantile due to cytochrome c oxidase deficiency: A very rare inherited metabolic disorder where the body doesn't have enough of an enzyme called cytochrome C oxidase (COX) which is needed in the process of energy production by body cells. The fatal infant type generally affects the hear, brain and kidneys as well as the muscles.
  • Cardiomyopathy, fatal fetal, due to myocardial calcification: A rare syndrome characterized by heart muscle disease caused by calcium deposits in the heart muscle. The disorder causes fetal death.
  • Cephalic disorders: Various congenital brain defects
  • Chagas disease: A parasitic infection caused by the protozoa Trypanosoma cruzi and transmitted by insect bites or blood transfusions. The disease primarily involves the heart and gastrointestinal system.
  • Chondrodysplasia punctata lethal neonatal: A rare skeletal disorder which results in the infant's death before or soon after birth. Symptoms include a variety of severe skeletal abnormalities and an enlarged head.
  • Chromosome 1, Partial Trisomy: A rare genetic disorder where part of the genetic material from chromosome 1 is duplicated so there are three copies in the body's cells rather than the normal two copies. The type and severity of symptoms is variable depending on the size and location of the genetic material duplicated.
  • Chromosome 1, pter-p36: A very rare chromosomal disorder where the end portion of the short arm of chromosome 1 is missing. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Chromosome 13 trisomy syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder where there are three copies of chromosome 13 rather than the normal two resulting in various abnormalities. Most die within months and there are few survivors after 10 years.
  • Chromosome 14 trisomy: A rare chromosomal disorder involving duplication of genetic material from chromosome 14 resulting in various abnormalities. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount and exact location of the genetic material that is duplicated.
  • Chromosome 16q, partial duplication: A rare chromosomal disorder involving an extra copy of genetic material from the long arm of chromosome 16. The type and severity of symptoms are determined by the amount and location of the duplicated genetic material. Severe cases often result in spontaneous abortion or infant death.
  • Chromosome 22, trisomy: A very rare disorder where there is an extra copy of chromosome 22 in all the body cells. The condition is usually fatal soon after birth or during the fetal stage.
  • Chromosome 3 duplication syndrome: There is very little information on this very rare genetic condition where there is an extra copy of chromosome 3 in the body's cells. The condition is considered lethal.
  • Ciclosporin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Ciclosporin (an immunosuppressant drug) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Classical Potter syndrome: A term that describes the physical appearance that occurs when kidney disease results in a reduced volume of amniotic fluid. In the classical type, both kidneys are absent.
  • Congenital cardiovascular malformations: The abnormal development of heart blood vessels. Specific examples of this condition includes hypoplastic left heart syndrome, coarctation and tricuspid atresia.
  • Congenital syphilis: Syphilis inherited from mother during pregnancy.
  • Craniorachischisis: A rare malformation characterized by skull and spinal bone defects which leaves the brain and the nerves in the spine exposed. The severity of the condition is variable and generally results in death before or soon after birth. Often other defects such as imperforate anus or hernia is also present.
  • Cyclosporin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Cyclosporin (an immunosuppressant drug) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Cyclosporine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Cyclosporine (an immunosuppressant drug) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Cytomegalovirus: A easily transmissible viral infection that is common but generally causes no symptoms except in infants and people with weakened immune systems.
  • Dandy-Walker variant: A less severe form of a brain malformation called Dandy-Walker. The brain malformation involves the development of a cyst which may interfere with the drainage of cerebrospinal fluid and lead to hydrocephalus. Many patients don't have symptoms until adulthood or remain asymptomatic but some may be severely affected.
  • Death: The loss of life.
  • Death-related symptoms: Symptoms related to death or dying.
  • Dennis-Fairhurst-Moore syndrome: A very rare lethal syndrome characterized mainly by dwarfism, characteristic facial features, small eyes and reduced hair.
  • Diaphragmatic hernia, congenital: A birth defect involving an abnormal opening in the diaphragm which is a structure that assists breathing and keeps the abdominal organs from moving into the chest. The abdominal organs can protrude through this abnormal opening and restrict the growth of chest organs such as the lung and heart. The severity of the condition is variable depending on the size of the defect - some cases aren't diagnosed until adulthood.
  • Digitalis -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Digitalis (a heart drug) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Digoxin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Digoxin (a heart drug) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Down Syndrome: A chromosome syndrome causing physical effects and mental retardation.
  • Duplication 13: A rare and very severe chromosome disorder leading to mental retardation and physical defects. It is so severe that many babies die soon after birth. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount and exact location of the genetic material that is duplicated.
  • Eclampsia: serious complication of pregnancy and is characterised by high blood pressure and convulsions
  • Enterovirus antenatal infection: Fetal infection with enterovirus. The condition is extremely rare but infection around the time of birth often results in death or paralysis in survivors. The type and severity of symptoms is determined by the exact type of virus involved and at what stage of development the infection occurs.
  • Ethanol -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Ethanol during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Exencephaly: A rare, fatal birth defect where parts of the skull bones are missing causing the brain to protrude.
  • Face symptoms: Symptoms affecting the face
  • Female reproductive symptoms: Symptoms affecting the female reproductive organs.
  • Fetal Growth Retardation: Impaired growth of the fetus due to any cause. Causes include maternal cyanotic heart disease, chronic maternal hypertension, placental abnormalities and multiple births.
  • Fetal aminopterin syndrome: A rare disorder which produces multiple abnormalities and results from a failed abortion attempt using the drugs aminopterin and methotrexate.
  • Fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia: A rare, potentially life-threatening disorder where the mother's blood platelets are incompatible with that of the fetus and the mother's antibodies cross the placenta and destroy fetal platelets.
  • Fetal parainfluenza virus type 3: Maternal infection with parainfluenza virus type 3 can cause a serious infection in the fetus and result in hydrocephalus. The risk is greatest during the first half of the pregnancy.
  • Fetal symptoms: Symptoms affecting the fetus during pregnancy.
  • Finnish lethal neonatal metabolic syndrome: A very rare lethal metabolic disorder characterized by a deficiency of complex III which causes brain, kidney and liver problems and ultimately results in early death.
  • Fluoxetine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Fluoxetine during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Gaucher disease -- perinatal lethal form: A rare syndrome characterized by the association of abnormally tight skin and Gaucher disease which is a lipid storage disease. This is the most severe form of Gaucher disease.
  • Generalized pustular psoriasis of pregnancy: A form of psoriasis that occurs during the third trimester of pregnancy and is characterized by pustules rather the skin bumps. The skin under and around the pustules is red and variable areas of skin may be involved. The pustules tends to occur in localized areas and then spreads to other parts of the body. It usually tends to recur during following pregnancies or with subsequent use of oral contraceptives.
  • Gestational diabetes: The occurrence of diabetes that's onset occurs during pregnancy
  • Gracile bone dysplasia: An inherited disorder characterized by brittle bones and thin, slender long bones and ribs as well as other abnormalities.
  • Greenberg dysplasia: A very rare form of short-limbed dwarfism.
  • HELLP syndrome: A rare potentially fatal condition that occurs in pregnant women and is frequently associated with pre-eclampsia.
  • HEM dysplasia: A rare disorder characterized by hydrops, dwarfism and abnormal bone calcification. The condition generally results in fetal death.
  • Head symptoms: Symptoms affecting the head or brain
  • Hermaphroditism: A very rare genetic disorder where a baby is born having both male and female internal sex organs.
  • Hydrops fetalis: Abnormal accumulation of fluid in the fetus which can be fatal. Excessive fluid leaves the blood and enters the tissues. It can have non-immune and immune (mother's immune system destroys fetal red blood cells).
  • Hypertension of pregnancy: Pregnancy hypertension is the development of high blood pressure during pregnancy. Hypertension is a serious health condition due to the fact that it often causes no symptoms until it is severe. The increased blood pressure can cause complications in pregnancy women e.g. eclampsia and HELLP syndrome. The blood pressure usually returns to normal after delivery.
  • Incontinentia Pigmenti: A rare genetic skin pigmentation disorder characterized by eye, teeth, bone, nail and hair malformations as well as central nervous abnormalities and mental deficiency.
  • Interferon Alpha -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Interferon Alpha during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Intrapartum Eclampsia: Intrapartum eclampsia is the development of seizures or coma in pregnant women suffering from high blood pressure. Intrapartum means that it occurs during the delivery of the baby. Eclampsia is a serious condition which requires urgent medical treatment. Eclampsia may be associated with moderate as well as significant increases in blood pressure. The blood pressure can return to normal after delivery or may persist for a period of time.
  • Intrauterine Growth Retardation: Slowly growing fetus in the womb during pregnancy
  • Japanese encephalitis: A form of encephalitis caused by a flavivirus (Japanese B encephalitis virus - JBEV) and transmitted by mosquito bites. Most cases are mild and asymptomatic but severe cases can lead to death.
  • Jugular lymphatic obstruction sequence: A rare disorder caused by obstruction of the jugular lymphatic system due to problems during the fetal stage of development.
  • Lethal arthrogryposis with anterior horn cell disease: A lethal genetic disorder involving multiple contractures and facial abnormalities.
  • Lethal arthrogryposis with anterior horn cell disease (LAAHD): A lethal disorder characterized by arthrogryposis and loss of anterior horn motor neurons which results in a lack of fetal movement.
  • Lethal congenital contracture syndrome (LCCS): A rare inherited lethal disorder characterized by multiple congenital contractures. There are two main types caused by different genetic defects. Type 2 differs from type 1 in that it includes additional head, face and eye symptoms and hydrops, joint webbing and fractures were usually absent.
  • Lethal congenital contracture syndrome 1: A rare inherited lethal disorder characterized by multiple congenital contractures. Type 1 occurs as a result of a genetic defect on chromosome 9q34.
  • Listeriosis: Bacterial food poisoning
  • Lovastatin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Lovastatin during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Methadone -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Methadone during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Miscarriage: Symptoms related to miscarriage or stillbirth.
  • Multiple pterygium syndrome lethal type: A rare syndrome characterized by skin, muscle and skeletal anomalies and fetal death.
  • Nemaline myopathy 2: A very rare inherited muscle disorder and is characterized by muscle weakness caused by the presence of nemaline rods in the muscle tissue which affects its function. There are at least 7 different subtypes of nemaline myopathy, each with a different genetic defect. The severity of the symptoms may vary greatly even among patients within a particular subtype of the disorder. Type 2 is caused by a defect on the nebulin gene on chromosome 2q22.
  • Nemaline myopathy 3: A very rare inherited muscle disorder and is characterized by muscle weakness caused by the presence of nemaline rods in the muscle tissue which affects its function. There are at least 7 different subtypes of nemaline myopathy, each with a different genetic defect. The severity of the symptoms may vary greatly even among patients within a particular subtype of the disorder. Type 3 is caused by a defect on the alpha-actin gene.
  • Neonatal hemochromatosis:
  • Nephrotic syndrome ocular anomalies: A rare disorder characterized by the association of particular eye anomalies with kidney disease. Kidney failure occurs before or soon after birth with death occurring within months of birth.
  • Oral facial digital syndrome, type 4: A rare inherited disorder characterized by facial, digital and oral abnormalities. Type IV is differentiated from the other types by the presence of severe shinbone deformity.
  • Parvovirus antenatal infection: Fetal infection with human parvovirus B19 - serious abnormalities rarely occur.
  • Perinatal-lethal Gaucher disease: A disorder caused by a deficiency of an enzyme called glucocerebrosidase. The foetal form is one of several forms of Gaucher disease and is the rarest. The fetal form causes death before birth or soon after.
  • Placenta conditions: Any condition that affects the placenta
  • Posterior valve, urethra: A congenital defect where there is an abnormal membrane in the back of the male urethra which affects urine flow. The urine can flow back through the valve and cause problems for organs such as the urethra, bladder, ureters and even the kidneys. The severity of the condition is determined by the severity of the malformation. Severe defects can cause fetal death and mild defects may cause incontinence.
  • Potter syndrome type 2: A term that describes the physical appearance that occurs when kidney disease results in a reduced volume of amniotic fluid. In type 2, one kidney is absent and the other is small and malformed.
  • Pregnancy symptoms: Symptoms related to pregnancy.
  • Pregnancy toxemia /hypertension: Preeclampsia is the development of high blood pressure, excess protein in the urine and swelling during pregnancy. Hypertension is a serious health condition due to the fact that it often causes no symptoms until it is severe. The blood pressure usually returns to normal after delivery.
  • Renal adysplasia dominant type: An inherited disorder of kidney development where either one kidney fails to develop normally, one kidney is absent, one kidney fails to develop normally and one kidney is absent or both kidneys are absent. Severity of the condition is highly variable: if there is one normal kidney the condition can be asymptomatic but if both kidneys are absent then the condition is lethal.
  • Rh Disease: A disease that can occur when the mother's blood is not compatible with the fetal blood i.e. when an Rh-negative mother had a Rh-positive child. If the baby's blood is exposed to the mother's blood (through placenta, abortion, miscarriage, amniocentesis) the mother's body becomes sensitized and develops antibodies the Rh-positive blood. In future pregnancies, the mother's antibodies can attack the red blood cells of the unborn baby resulting in hemolytic disease. The severity of the disease is variable and can range from mild fetal anemia to severe anemia and even fetal death.
  • Rubella congenital syndrome: The transplacental infection of a fetus with rubella
  • Rubella virus antenatal infection: A rare disorder caused by exposure of the fetus to maternal rubella and resulting in a range of abnormalities and fetal death is also possible.
  • Samson-Viljoen syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized by small ears, abnormal chest wall and facial, lip and palate clefts.
  • Seckel-like syndrome, Majoor-Krakauer type: A very rare syndrome characterized by numerous abnormalities including poor fetal growth, reduced amniotic fluid and heart, brain spleen and kidney anomalies.
  • Septic abortion: An abortion associated with a uterine infection. The infection can occur during or just before or after an abortion. The infection can result from factors such as Chlamydia, IUD's or attempted abortion using infected tools.
  • Sickle Cell Anemia: Sickle cell anemia is an inherited blood disorder characterized by red blood cells which are crescent-shaped rather than the normal doughnut shape. These abnormally shaped red blood cells are unable to function normally and tend to undergo premature destruction which leads to anemia. If the genetic defect which causes the condition is inherited from both parents the condition can be quite severe whereas if it is inherited from only one parent, often there are no symptoms. The abnormally shaped red blood cells can cause problems when they clump together and block blood vessels.
  • Simvastatin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Simvastatin during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Slap-cheek syndrome: Viral infection where children get rosy cheeks.
  • Spondylo-humero-femoral dysplasia: A rare genetic disorder characterized by bone formation abnormalities, short stature and early death.
  • Stillbirth: Where a woman delivers a child who is dead
  • TORCH Syndrome: Infection of a fetus by any of a group of infectious agents which have been transmitted from the mother through the placenta. The infections include toxoplasmosis, rubella, cytomegalovirus, herpes virus, hepatitis and syphilis. The severity and nature of symptoms is determined by the type of infection.
  • Transplacental infections: An infection that passes from the mother to the fetus via the placenta. A large variety of infections can occur like this and the type and severity of symptoms can vary greatly depending on the type of infection and the stage of fetal development at which infection occurs. Examples of transplacental infections include cytomegalovirus, herpes virus, hepatitis, syphilis, toxoplasmosis and rubella.
  • Triosephosphate isomerase 1: A rare inherited blood disorder involving a deficiency of red cell triosephosphate isomerase which is involved in the glycolysis (glucose metabolism) process to produce energy. The disorder is characterized by anemia, recurring infection and often progressive neurological degeneration. The severity of the disorder is variable with some patients having central nervous system involvement while others don't.
  • Triploid syndrome: A complete extra set of chromosomes.
  • Trisomy 12 mosaicism: A very rare chromosomal disorder where there is an extra copy of chromosome 12 in some of the body's cells. Some cases with this chromosomal abnormality have no clinical symptoms. The presence of abnormalities in some cases is dependent on which body cells contain the chromosomal defect.
  • Trisomy 13 mosaicism: A very rare chromosomal disorder where there is an extra copy of chromosome 13 in some of the body's cells. Some cases with this chromosomal abnormality have no clinical symptoms. The presence of abnormalities in some cases is dependent on which body cells contain the chromosomal defect. There appears to be a direct correlation between the number of cells in the body containing the chromosomal defect and severity of symptoms and survival.
  • Trisomy 18 mosaicism: A rare genetic chromosomal syndrome where the child has an extra third copy of chromosome 18 in only some of the body's cells. It is a less severe form of Edwards syndrome - the most severe form involves and extra copy of chromosome 18 in all of the body's cells. The severity of the condition is highly variable depending on how many of the body's cells are involved.
  • Trisomy 20 mosaicism: A very rare chromosomal disorder where there is an extra copy of chromosome 20 in some of the body's cells. Some cases with this chromosomal abnormality have no clinical symptoms. The presence of abnormalities in some cases is dependent on which body cells contain the chromosomal defect.
  • Trisomy 4 mosaicism: A very rare chromosomal disorder where there is an extra copy of chromosome 4 in some of the body's cells. Some cases with this chromosomal abnormality have no clinical symptoms. The presence of abnormalities in some cases is dependent on which body cells contain the chromosomal defect.
  • Turner Syndrome: Rare chromosome syndrome with one X but no second X or Y chromosome.
  • Twin-Twin Transfusion Syndrome: A condition which can occur to twins in the uterus of the carrying mother due to transfusion of blood from one to the other
  • Urethral obstruction sequence: A condition which is characterised by the early obstruction of the urethra.
  • Urinary tract infection: Infection of the urinary tract
  • Urophathy distal obstructive polydactyly: A rare syndrome characterized by extra digits and an obstructive urinary system disorder.
  • Valproic Acid -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Valproic Acid during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Women's health symptoms: Symptoms related to women's health.
  • Young syndrome: Symptoms in a fetus that occur when the mother is suffering from advanced diabetes mellitus during pregnancy.

Conditions listing medical symptoms: Fetal death:

The following list of conditions have 'Fetal death' or similar listed as a symptom in our database. This computer-generated list may be inaccurate or incomplete. Always seek prompt professional medical advice about the cause of any symptom.

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Conditions listing medical complications: Fetal death:

The following list of medical conditions have 'Fetal death' or similar listed as a medical complication in our database.

 

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