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Symptoms » Frontal bossing » Glossary
 

Glossary for Frontal bossing

Medical terms related to Frontal bossing or mentioned in this section include:

  • 1q proximal deletion: A rare chromosomal disorder where the proximal part of the long arm (q) of chromosome 1 is deleted resulting in various abnormalities.
  • 2p21 deletion syndrome: This syndrome is a more severe form hypotonia-cystinuria syndrome as a larger portion of genetic material from chromosome 2p21 is deleted. It is characterized by infant seizures, reduced muscle tone, developmental delay, lactic acidosis and unusual facial appearance.
  • Acrocephalosyndactyly type 3 (ACPS 3): A rare genetic disorder characterized by premature joining of certain skull bones during development which has an impact on the shape of the head and face. Features include brachycephaly, ear deformities as well as craniofacial, finger and bone abnormalities.
  • Aicardi syndrome: A rare genetic disorder where the structure connecting the two halves of the brain fails to develop which results in seizures and eye abnormalities .
  • Aniridia: A genetic disorder where part or all of the iris of one or both eyes is missing. The iris is the colored part of the eye. There are four forms of the disease: AN-1, AN-II, AN-III and AN-IV.
  • Aniridia -- renal agenesis -- psychomotor retardation: A rare genetic disorder characterized by missing irises of the eye, kidney developmental problems and mental retardation.
  • Antley-Bixler Syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by premature closing of skull bones, choanal atresia and craniofacial and limb abnormalities.
  • Arthrogryposis IUGR thoracic dystrophy: A very rare syndrome characterized by congenital joint contractures, intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) and ribcage abnormalities.
  • Auralcephalosyndactyly: A very rare syndrome characterized by ear abnormalities, premature fusion of skull bones and syndactyly (fusion of digits).
  • Cephalopolysyndactyly: A rare genetic disorder characterized by premature closing of skull bones and craniofacial abnormalities, finger and toe abnormalities. The type and severity of symptoms is variable with many cases remaining undiagnosed because their condition is relatively mild and doesn't cause many problems.
  • Chromosome 1, uniparental disomy 1q12 q21: A rare chromosomal disorder where part or all of the short arm (p) of chromosome 1 is deleted resulting in various abnormalities which are determined by the size of the deleted portion.
  • Chromosome 10, Monosomy 10p:
  • Chromosome 10, trisomy 10p: A rare chromosomal disorder where there are three copies of the short arm (p) of chromosome 10 rather than the normal two resulting in various abnormalities. The type and severity of symptoms depend on the amount and location of genetic material duplicated.
  • Chromosome 10p deletion syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder where there is a deletion of the short arm (p) of chromosome 10 resulting in variable abnormalities.
  • Chromosome 10p duplication syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder where there are three copies of the short arm (p) of chromosome 10 rather than the normal two resulting in various abnormalities. The type and severity of symptoms depend on the amount and location of genetic material duplicated.
  • Chromosome 10p duplication/10q deletion syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder where a section of the short arm (p) of chromosome 10 is duplicated and a section of the long arm (q) of chromosome 10 is deleted resulting in various abnormalities.
  • Chromosome 12p deletion: A rare chromosomal disorder where there is a deletion of the short arm (p) of chromosome 12 resulting in various abnormalities. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount and exact location of the genetic material that is deleted.
  • Chromosome 12p deletion syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder where there is a deletion of the short arm (p) of chromosome 12 resulting in various abnormalities.
  • Chromosome 15 Ring: A rare chromosomal disorder where genetic material from one or both ends of chromosome 15 is missing and the two broken ends have rejoined to form a ring. The resulting type and severity of symptoms is determined by the amount and location of genetic material missing.
  • Chromosome 16q, partial duplication: A rare chromosomal disorder involving an extra copy of genetic material from the long arm of chromosome 16. The type and severity of symptoms are determined by the amount and location of the duplicated genetic material. Severe cases often result in spontaneous abortion or infant death.
  • Chromosome 17p, partial deletion: A rare chromosomal disorder involving deletion of genetic material from the short arm of chromosome 17. The type and severity of symptoms are determined by the amount and location of the lost genetic material.
  • Chromosome 17p, partial duplication: A rare chromosomal disorder involving an extra copy of genetic material from the short arm of chromosome 17. The type and severity of symptoms are determined by the amount and location of the duplicated genetic material.
  • Chromosome 17q, partial duplication: A rare chromosomal disorder involving an extra copy of genetic material from the long arm of chromosome 17. The type and severity of symptoms are determined by the amount and location of the duplicated genetic material.
  • Chromosome 1p deletion syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder where part or all of the short arm (p) of chromosome 1 is deleted resulting in various abnormalities which are determined by the size of the deleted portion.
  • Chromosome 1q duplication syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder involving duplication of the long arm (q) of chromosome 1 which results in various abnormalities depending on the size and location of the portion of duplicated genetic material.
  • Chromosome 2 trisomy syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder where there are three copies of chromosome 2 instead of the normal two.
  • Chromosome 22, trisomy: A very rare disorder where there is an extra copy of chromosome 22 in all the body cells. The condition is usually fatal soon after birth or during the fetal stage.
  • Chromosome 22q deletion: A rare genetic disorder where a portion of the genetic material from the long arm of chromosome 22 is missing. The symptoms or severity may vary somewhat between patients.
  • Chromosome 22q deletion syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder where the long arm of chromosome 22 is deleted resulting in various abnormalities.
  • Chromosome 3, trisomy 3p: A rare chromosomal disorder where a portion of the short arm (p) of chromosome 3 is duplicated so there is three copies of it rather than the normal two.
  • Chromosome 3, trisomy 3q: A rare chromosomal disorder where a portion of the long arm (q) of chromosome 3 is duplicated so there is three copies of it rather than the normal two. The condition is characterized by mental and growth deficiency, broad nose root and excessive hair growth.
  • Chromosome 4, Monosomy 4q: A rare chromosomal disorder where a portion of the long arm (q) of chromosome 4 is missing resulting in various abnormalities.
  • Chromosome 7, trisomy 7q: A rare chromosomal disorder involving duplication of the long arm (q) of chromosome 7 which results in various abnormalities depending on the size and location of the portion of duplicated genetic material.
  • Chromosome 7q duplication syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder involving duplication of the long arm (q) of chromosome 7 which results in various abnormalities depending on the size and location of the portion of duplicated genetic material.
  • Chromosome 8, trisomy 8p: A rare chromosomal disorder where the short arm (p) of chromosome 8 is duplicated resulting in three copies instead of two. The type and severity of symptoms depends on the location and length of genetic material duplicated.
  • Chromosome 8p duplication syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder where the short arm (p) of chromosome 8 is duplicated resulting in three copies instead of two. The type and severity of symptoms depends on the location and length of genetic material duplicated.
  • Chromosome 8p mosaic tetrasomy: A rare chromosomal disorder where a part of the short arm of chromosome 8 is repeated four times in some of the body's cells instead of the normal two resulting in various abnormalities.
  • Chromosome 9q duplication/chromosome 9p deletion syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder where part of the long arm (q) of chromosome 9 is duplicated and part of the short arm (p) is deleted resulting in various abnormalities. These chromosomal abnormality occurs in only some of the body's cells (mosaicism).
  • Cleidocranial dysplasia: A rare genetic disorder characterized by collarbone defects, late ossification of cranial sutures and delayed tooth eruption.
  • Craniofacial dysostosis type 1: A rare genetic disorder characterized by premature joining of certain skull bones during development which has an impact on the shape of the head and face. Features include poor vision, hypoplasia of maxilla an impaired hearing.
  • Craniofrontonasal Syndrome: A congenital condition with multiple anomalies associated with mental retardation and skeletal disfigurement.
  • Crouzon Syndrome: A condition which is characterized by craniofacial dysostosis
  • Deletion of the Short Arm of Chromosome 1: A condition characterized by deletion of the short arm of chromosome 1
  • Developmental problems: Physical or mental development difficulty.
  • Duplication 10p: A rare chromosomal disorder where there are three copies of the short arm (p) of chromosome 10 rather than the normal two resulting in various abnormalities. The type and severity of symptoms depend on the amount and location of genetic material duplicated.
  • Duplication 7q: A rare chromosomal disorder involving duplication of the long arm (q) of chromosome 7 which results in various abnormalities depending on the size and location of the portion of duplicated genetic material.
  • Duplication 8p: A rare chromosomal disorder where the short arm (p) of chromosome 8 is duplicated resulting in three copies instead of two. The type and severity of symptoms depends on the location and length of genetic material duplicated.
  • Face symptoms: Symptoms affecting the face
  • Forehead symptoms: Symptoms affecting the forehead.
  • Francois dyscephalic syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by very small stature, microphthalmia, small pinched nose and hypotrichosis.
  • Fucosidosis type 1: A rare biochemical disorder involving deficiency of an enzyme (alpha-fucosidase) which results in accumulation of certain chemicals (glycosphingolipids) in the central nervous system and other body tissues. It is an infantile form of fucosidosis which starts early and rapidly progresses to early death.
  • Fucosidosis type II: A form of the biochemical disorder called fucosidosis where an enzyme deficiency (alpha-fucosidase) results in the accumulation of certain chemicals (glycosphingolipids) in the central nervous system and other body tissues. Symptoms start later and progress slower than in type I and is distinguished by warty skin growths.
  • Greig Cephalopolysyndactyly Syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by premature closing of skull bones and craniofacial abnormalities, finger and toe abnormalities.
  • Head symptoms: Symptoms affecting the head or brain
  • MULIBREY Nanism: A genetic condition
  • Mouth symptoms: Symptoms of the mouth or oral area.
  • Mulibrey Nanism syndrome: A very rare inherited malformation characterized by very small stature (dwarfism), pericardial constriction and yellow dots in fundus of the eye.
  • Osteopetrosis lethal: A severe, lethal form of the brittle bone condition called osteopetrosis.
  • Robinow syndrome, autosomal recessive: A rare genetic disorder characterized by a flat face, short forearms, vertebral anomalies and hypoplastic genitalia.
  • Robinow syndrome, recessive form: A rare genetic disorder characterized by a flat face, short forearms, vertebral anomalies and underdeveloped genitals.
  • Rubinstein-Taybi Syndrome: A rare congenital disorder characterized by very small stature, broad thumbs and toes, slanted palpebral fissures and hypoplastic maxilla.
  • Saethre-Chotzen Syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by premature joining of certain skull bones during development which has an impact on the shape of the head and face. Features include brachycephaly, ear deformities as well as craniofacial, finger and bone abnormalities.
  • Say-Carpenter syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by wide set eyes, abnormally placed urethral opening in males and abnormal bone development.
  • Skeletal symptoms: Symptoms affecting the skeletal system such as the bones.
  • Skull symptoms: Symptoms affecting the skull surrounding the brain.
  • TDO type II: A rare genetic ectodermal disorder characterized by kinky hair, tooth enamel and bone abnormalities and differs from type I mainly by a small head and increased long bone density.
  • Tricho-dento-osseous syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by kinky hair, tooth enamel and bone abnormalities. There are two different subtypes with type I being distinguished from type II by the presence of a small head and increased density in the long bones.
  • Tricho-dento-osseous syndrome II:
  • Tricho-dento-osseous syndrome type:
  • Tricho-dento-osseous syndrome type I: A rare genetic ectodermal disorder characterized by kinky hair, tooth enamel and bone abnormalities.
  • Warman Mulliken Hayward syndrome: This syndrome is a form of craniosynostosis
  • Webster Deming syndrome: A craniofrontonasal dysplasia that is x-linked in inheritance

Conditions listing medical symptoms: Frontal bossing:

The following list of conditions have 'Frontal bossing' or similar listed as a symptom in our database. This computer-generated list may be inaccurate or incomplete. Always seek prompt professional medical advice about the cause of any symptom.

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