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Symptoms » Irregular heartbeat » Glossary
 

Glossary for Irregular heartbeat

Medical terms related to Irregular heartbeat or mentioned in this section include:

  • Abnormal Heart Rhythm: An abnormal way of the heart beating
  • Achrestic anemia: Achrestic anemia is a form of anemia similar to that caused by Vitamin B12 deficiency but it doesn't respond to treatment with Vitamin B12. The condition tends to progress slowly and can result in death if not treated. There are a variety of possible causes.
  • Acquired Aplastic Anemia: A rare disorder involving severe failure of the bone marrow to produce new blood cells. Acquired aplastic anemia means that the condition was not present at birth but developed during the persons lifetime. The condition may be caused by such things as autoimmune reactions, radiation and certain drugs, chemicals or viral infections.
  • Adrenal Cancer: A malignant cancer that develops in the adrenal gland. The tumor may be nonfunctioning (does not produce hormones) or functioning in which case excessive levels of hormones can cause a variety of symptoms depending on which hormone is involved. Adrenal hormones made in the cortex (outer part of the gland) are aldosterone, corticosteroids and androgenic steroids. Adrenalin and noradrenalin are the hormones made in the medulla (central part of the adrenal gland).
  • Adrenal adenoma, familial: A benign tumor that develops in the adrenal gland and tends to run in families. The tumor may be nonfunctioning (does not produce hormones) or functioning in which case excessive levels of hormones can cause a variety of symptoms depending on which hormone is involved. Adrenal hormones made in the cortex (outer part of the gland) are aldosterone, corticosteroids and androgenic steroids . Adrenalin and noradrenalin are the hormones made in the medulla (central part of the adrenal gland).
  • Adrenal gland hyperfunction: Excessive activity of the adrenal gland which causes excessive production of one or more adrenal hormones (aldosterone, corticosteroids, androgenic steroids, epinephrine and norepinephrine). The increased adrenal gland activity may be caused by an adrenal gland tumor or by excessive stimulation of the gland. Pituitary hormones stimulate adrenal gland activity.
  • Adrenal incidentaloma: A tumor of the adrenal gland that is discovered incidentally while performing an imaging examination for reasons other than an adrenal tumor. The tumor may be asymptomatic or can causes excessive secretion of adrenal hormones and resulting symptoms. The tumor may also be malignant or benign.
  • Adrenal medulla neoplasm: A tumor that develops in the part of the adrenal gland called the medulla which produces adrenalin and noradrenaline. The tumor is usually benign but can be malignant.
  • Amanita polypyramis poisoning: Amanita polypyramis is a type of large-capped mushroom often found growing in the wild in the US. The mushroom tends to give off a chlorine-like odor. It is poisonous and death can result if sufficient quantities are eaten.
  • Amitriptyline -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Amitriptyline during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Amphetamine abuse: Use of the stimulant drugs known as amphetamines or "speed"
  • Amyloidosis, inflammatory: Amyloidosis is a rare group of metabolic disorders where a protein called amyloid accumulates in body organs and tissues where it can cause damage and is potentially fatal. Symptoms depend on the organs involved. Secondary amyloidosis is caused by a chronic infection of inflammatory conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, multiple myeloma, tuberculosis and osteomyelitis. The main organs affected in secondary amyloidosis are usually the kidneys, liver, spleen and lymph nodes. The peripheral and autonomic nerves and the heart are rarely affected.
  • Anaesthesia: loss of sensations
  • Andersen-Tawil syndrome: A rare disorder where a genetic mutation causes periods of muscle weakness, heart rhythm abnormalities and various physical development abnormalities. It is believed to be caused by problems with the way the body utilizes potassium.
  • Anemia: Reduced red blood cells in the blood
  • Anemia of pregnancy: Anemia of pregnancy is anemia that occurs during pregnancy. Women's bodies have a greater demand for iron during pregnancy and if intake is not sufficient, anemia can result. Anemia in pregnant women can lead to infant problems such as premature birth, fetal death, retarded growth and other problems.
  • Aortic valve incompetence: A condition characterized by an inability of the aortic valve to function effectively
  • Arrhythmia: The occurrence of an irregular heart beat
  • Arrhythmias: The occurrence of irregular heart beats
  • Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia: A rare heart muscle disease where the muscle tissue of the right ventricle of the heart is replaced by fibrous or fatty tissue which affects the ability of the heart to pump blood.
  • Atrial Fibrillation, Familial 2: A rare inherited condition where abnormal electrical activity in the heart causes it to have a fast and irregular beat. The condition may go unnoticed or may cause stroke or sudden death in some cases. Type 2 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 6q14-q16 and is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner. Symptoms tend to occur in episodes initially and then becomes chronic with increased age.
  • Atrial Fibrillation, Familial 3: A rare inherited condition where abnormal electrical activity in the heart causes it to have a fast and irregular beat. The condition may go unnoticed or may cause stroke or sudden death in some cases. Type 3 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 11p15.5 and is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner.
  • Atrial Fibrillation, Familial 4: A rare inherited condition where abnormal electrical activity in the heart causes it to have a fast and irregular beat. The condition may go unnoticed or may cause stroke or sudden death in some cases. Type 4 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 21q22.
  • Atrial Fibrillation, Familial 5: A rare inherited condition where abnormal electrical activity in the heart causes it to have a fast and irregular beat. The condition may go unnoticed or may cause stroke or sudden death in some cases. Type 5 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 4q2.
  • Atrial Fibrillation, Familial 6: A rare inherited condition where abnormal electrical activity in the heart causes it to have a fast and irregular beat. The condition may go unnoticed or may cause stroke or sudden death in some cases. Type 6 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 1p36.2 and is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner.
  • Atrial Fibrillation, Familial 7: A rare inherited condition where abnormal electrical activity in the heart causes it to have a fast and irregular beat. The condition may go unnoticed or may cause stroke or sudden death in some cases. Type 7 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 12p13 and is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner.
  • Atrial Fibrillation, Familial 8: A rare inherited condition where abnormal electrical activity in the heart causes it to have a fast and irregular beat. The condition may go unnoticed or may cause stroke or sudden death in some cases. Type 8 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 16q22 and is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner. Symptoms tend to occur in episodes initially and then becomes chronic with increased age.
  • Atrial fibrillation: A rhythm disturbance of the heart that results in irregular and chaotic ventricular contractions.
  • Atrial fibrillation, familial 1: A dominantly inherited condition where abnormal electrical activity in the heart causes it to have a fast and irregular beat. The condition may go unnoticed or may cause stroke or sudden death in some cases.
  • Atrial flutter: Heart arrhythmia where atria beat more often than ventricles
  • Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia: Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is characterized by an abnormal immune system response which leads to the destruction of red blood cells and hence anemia. The severity of the condition varies depending on the underlying cause e.g. cytomegalovirus, hepatitis, HIV and lupus. The condition may develop gradually or occur suddenly and cause serious symptoms.
  • Bernheim syndrome: Overgrowth of the left heart ventricle which results in the tissue separating the two ventricles pushing into the right ventricle. This results in obstruction of blood flow through the right heart ventricle and ultimately can lead to heart failure.
  • Bernheim's syndrome: Reduced size of right heart ventricle due to enlargement of the left ventricle which encroaches on the space in the right ventricle. Blood flow from the right atrium to the right ventricle is obstructed.
  • Bretylium -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Bretylium during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Bulimia nervosa: Eating disorder with binging (overeating) and purging (vomiting).
  • CFS subtype 1 (cognitive, musculoskeletal, sleep, anxiety/depression): Chronic fatigue syndrome is a chronic condition which is characterized by symptoms such as severe persistent fatigue, depression, weakness, muscle pain and lack of energy. The condition is often debilitating and may be difficult to diagnose due to lack of specific tests for the condition. There is no known cause but it appears to be associated with a previous infection in some cases. CFS subtype 1 tends to be more severe with the dominant symptoms being anxiety, depression and cognitive, musculoskeletal and sleeping problems.
  • CFS subtype 2 ( musculoskeletal, pain, anxiety/depression): Chronic fatigue syndrome is a chronic condition which is characterized by symptoms such as severe persistent fatigue, depression, weakness, muscle pain and lack of energy. The condition is often debilitating and may be difficult to diagnose due to lack of specific tests for the condition. There is no known cause but it appears to be associated with a previous infection in some cases. CFS subtype 2 tends to be more severe with the dominant symptoms being anxiety, depression, pain and musculoskeletal problems.
  • CFS subtype 3 (mild): Chronic fatigue syndrome is a chronic condition which is characterized by symptoms such as severe persistent fatigue, depression, weakness, muscle pain and lack of energy. The condition is often debilitating and may be difficult to diagnose due to lack of specific tests for the condition. There is no known cause but it appears to be associated with a previous infection in some cases. CFS subtype 3 tends to have milder symptoms than other subtypes.
  • CFS subtype 4 (cognitive, musculoskeletal, sleep, anxiety/depression): Chronic fatigue syndrome is a chronic condition which is characterized by symptoms such as severe persistent fatigue, depression, weakness, muscle pain and lack of energy. The condition is often debilitating and may be difficult to diagnose due to lack of specific tests for the condition. There is no known cause but it appears to be associated with a previous infection in some cases. CFS subtype 4 tends to be dominated by cognitive symptoms.
  • CFS subtype 5 (musculoskeletal, gastrointestinal): Chronic fatigue syndrome is a chronic condition which is characterized by symptoms such as severe persistent fatigue, depression, weakness, muscle pain and lack of energy. The condition is often debilitating and may be difficult to diagnose due to lack of specific tests for the condition. There is no known cause but it appears to be associated with a previous infection in some cases. CFS subtype 5 tends to be dominated by musculoskeletal and gastrointestinal symptoms.
  • CFS subtype 6 (postexertional): Chronic fatigue syndrome is a chronic condition which is characterized by symptoms such as severe persistent fatigue, depression, weakness, muscle pain and lack of energy. The condition is often debilitating and may be difficult to diagnose due to lack of specific tests for the condition. There is no known cause but it appears to be associated with a previous infection in some cases. CFS subtype 6 tends to be dominated by excessive fatigue following exertion.
  • CFS subtype 7 (pain, infectious, musculoskeletal, sleep, neurological, gastrointestinal, neurocognitive, anxiety/depression): Chronic fatigue syndrome is a chronic condition which is characterized by symptoms such as severe persistent fatigue, depression, weakness, muscle pain and lack of energy. The condition is often debilitating and may be difficult to diagnose due to lack of specific tests for the condition. There is no known cause but it appears to be associated with a previous infection in some cases. CFS subtype 7 tends to be more severe with the dominant symptoms being pain, infections, anxiety, depression and musculoskeletal, sleep, neurological, gastrointestinal and neurocognitive problems.
  • Calcitriol -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Calcitriol during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Cardiovascular symptoms: Symptoms affecting the heart and related vascular systems.
  • Carnitine Palmitoyl Transferase II Deficiency: A very rare inherited deficiency of a particular enzyme (Carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1) prevents fatty acids being transported to the part of the cell that converts it to energy. There are two main subtypes of the disorder with each involving a slightly different form of the enzyme. Type I can be readily managed through diet. Type II has three subtypes: the myopathic form affects mainly the muscles; the hepatocardiomuscular form affects the liver and heart muscle; and the lethal neonatal form affects muscles and organs and usually results in death during the first year of life.
  • Carnitine palmitoyl transferase 2 deficiency: A very rare inherited deficiency of a particular enzyme (Carnitine palmitoyl transferase) which prevents fatty acids being transported to the part of the cell that converts it to energy. There are two main subtypes of the disorder with each involving a slightly different form of the enzyme. Type I can be readily managed through diet. Type II has three subtypes: the myopathic form affects mainly the muscles; the hepatocardiomuscular form affects the liver and heart muscle; and the lethal neonatal form affects muscles and organs and usually results in death during the first year of life.
  • Carnitine palmitoyl transferase II deficiency, lethal neonatal form: A very rare metabolic disorder where deficiency of a particular enzyme (CPT II) prevents muscle fats being converted to energy. The lethal neonatal form affects various organs as well as the muscles and death usually occurs during the first year of life.
  • Carnitine palmitoyl transferase deficiency: A very rare inherited deficiency of a particular enzyme (Carnitine palmitoyl transferase) which prevents fatty acids being transported to the part of the cell that converts it to energy. There are two main subtypes of the disorder with each involving a slightly different form of the enzyme. Type I can be readily managed through diet. Type II has three subtypes: the myopathic form affects mainly the muscles; the hepatocardiomuscular form affects the liver and heart muscle; and the lethal neonatal form affects muscles and organs and usually results in death during the first year of life.
  • Cephalosporin-induced Immune Hemolytic Anemia: Cephalosporin-induced immune hemolytic anemia is a condition where a use of a medication called Cephalosporin triggers the body's immune system to destroy it's own red blood cells which results in anemia.
  • Chaotic atrial tachycardia: Abnormal irregular, rapid heart beat that originates in the atrial heart chamber of the heart and occurs in infants and young children. The heart has periods of normal rhythm between the periods of irregularity. The condition occurs in infants and young children but may also occur in adults who have disorders such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.
  • Chemical burn -- airways: Burns to the airways caused by a chemical - usually through inhalation but can also occur through aspiration if the chemical is swallowed. Symptoms vary depending on the type, quantity and strength of the chemical involved as well as the duration of the exposure to the chemical and promptness of treatment measures. Immediate medical attention should be sought if chemical burns to the airways are suspected.
  • Chemical burn -- ingestion: Burns to the mouth and gastrointestinal system caused by swallowing a chemical. Symptoms vary depending on the type, quantity and strength of the chemical involved as well as the duration of the exposure to the chemical and promptness of treatment measures. Immediate medical attention should be sought if chemical burns to the gastrointestinal system are suspected.
  • Chemical burn -- inhalation: Burns to the airways caused by a chemical through inhalation. Symptoms vary depending on the type, quantity and strength of the chemical involved as well as the duration of the exposure to the chemical and promptness of treatment measures. Immediate medical attention should be sought if chemical burns to the airways are suspected.
  • Chemical burn -- skin: Burns to the skin caused by a chemical. Symptoms vary depending on the type, quantity and strength of the chemical involved as well as the duration of the exposure to the chemical and promptness of treatment measures.
  • Chemical burns: burns causing protein coagulation
  • Chemical poisoning -- Carbinoxamine: Carbinoxamine is a therapeutic treatment for allergic rhinitis. It is marketed under names such as Histex, Pediatiex and Carboxine. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chloramphenicol-induced Sideroblastic anemia: Chloramphenicol-induced sideroblastic anemia is a blood disorder caused by taking a drug called chloramphenicol. The body has sufficient iron levels but is unable to utilise it properly in red blood cells. The iron becomes abnormally deposited in red blood cells which make them unable to function properly.
  • Chlorpromazine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Chlorpromazine (a neuroleptic drug) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Chronic fatigue syndrome: A persistent debilitating fatigue of recent onset
  • Cocaine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Cocaine during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Codeine withdrawal: Symptoms that occur when Codeine use is discontinued or reduced. Codeine is a sedative pain-killer. Symptoms may vary depending on the level of dependence.
  • Cold Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia: Cold autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a condition where the body's immune system triggers the production of antibodies against the body's own red blood cells. The red cells are destroyed at an abnormally rapid rate which leads to anemia. Cold haemolytic anemia is characterized by the fact that the abnormal destruction of red blood cells is more active when the patient is exposed to cold temperatures. The severity of the condition varies depending on the underlying cause. The condition may develop gradually or occur suddenly and cause serious symptoms.
  • Congenital heart septum defect: A heart defect involving the septum which is present at birth. The defect is a hole in the wall of the heart that separates the right and left chambers and allows blood to flow through the hole. An atrial septal defect is a hole between the two upper heart chambers and a ventricular septal defect is a hole between the two lower heart chambers. Symptoms are determined by the size and exact location of the defect.
  • Copper deficiency-induced Sideroblastic anemia: Copper deficiency-induced sideroblastic anemia is a blood disorder caused insufficient quantities of copper. The body has sufficient iron levels but is unable to utilise it properly in red blood cells due to the lack of copper. The iron becomes abnormally deposited in red blood cells which make them unable to function properly.
  • Crystal meth addiction: An uncontrollable desire to use crystal meth on a regular basis. Crystal meth is a powerful stimulant used illegally for its effects. It is highly addictive and known by street names such as ice, speed, glass, crank and chalk. Frequent use leads to an increased tolerance to the drug so higher and higher doses are required to achieve the desired euphoric feeling.
  • Cycloserine-induced Sideroblastic anemia: Cycloserine -induced sideroblastic anemia is a blood disorder caused by taking a drug called Cycloserine. The body has sufficient iron levels but is unable to utilise it properly in red blood cells. The iron becomes abnormally deposited in red blood cells which make them unable to function properly.
  • Darvocet overdose: Darvocet is a prescription drug mainly used to treat pain. Excessive doses of the drug can result in various symptoms and even death in severe cases.
  • Digoxin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Digoxin (a heart drug) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Dilated cardiomyopathy: A rare chronic heart muscle condition where one or both heart ventricles are dilated or have impaired contractility.
  • Dimorphic anemia: Dimorphic refers to anemia that has two different causes acting together e.g. iron deficiency as well as a Vitamin B12 deficiency.
  • Dothiepin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Dothiepin during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Doxepine-induced Immune Hemolytic Anemia: Doxepine -induced immune hemolytic anemia is a condition where use of a medication called Methyldopa triggers the body's immune system to destroy it's own red blood cells which results in anemia.
  • Drug overdose: A condition characterized by the consumption in excess of a particular drug causing adverse effects
  • Drug-induced Immune Hemolytic Anemia: Drug-induced immune hemolytic anemia is a condition where a medication triggers the body's immune system to destroy its own red blood cells which results in anemia. Certain drugs are more likely to trigger this abnormal immune response than others e.g. cephalosphorins and Quinidine.
  • Drug-induced Sideroblastic anemia: Drug-induced sideroblastic anemia is a blood disorder caused by drugs such as cycloserine, isoniazid and ethanol. The body has sufficient iron levels but is unable to utilise it properly in red blood cells. The iron becomes abnormally deposited in red blood cells which make them unable to function properly.
  • Eating symptoms: Symptoms related to eating.
  • Electrolyte abnormality: An imbalance in the level of any of a number of chemicals (electrolytes) in the blood stream e.g. chloride, sodium, magnesium, potassium, calcium, phosphate and bicarbonate. Symptoms can vary depending on which electrolyte is involved and the severity of the imbalance - severe cases can readily lead to death. An electrolyte abnormality can be caused by such things excessive loss of body fluid through vomiting or diarrhea, kidney conditions, malabsorption and various drugs such as diuretics and chemotherapy drugs.
  • Emerinopathy: A rare, progressive muscle disease that starts during childhood and involves muscle weakness and wasting.
  • Endocarditis: Inflammatory alterations of the endocardium of ones heart
  • Ethanol-induced Sideroblastic anemia: Ethanol-induced sideroblastic anemia is a blood disorder caused by consuming ethanol. The body has sufficient iron levels but is unable to utilise it properly in red blood cells. The iron becomes abnormally deposited in red blood cells which make them unable to function properly.
  • Fabry disease: Genetic fat storage disorder
  • Fabry's Disease: An inherited metabolic disorder where phospholipids are deposited mostly in the blood vessels as well as other tissues and organs. Symptoms include skin lesions, small red spots on the abdomen, thighs and scrotum, fever, peripheral edema, hypertension and renal failure. Also called angiokeratoma corporis diffusion, Anderson's syndrome, Anderson-Fabry disease, Morbus Anderson-Fabry, Ruiter-Pompen syndrome or Sweeley-Klionsky disease.
  • Familial atrial fibrillation: A rare inherited condition where abnormal electrical activity in the heart causes it to have a fast and irregular beat. The condition may go unnoticed or may cause stroke or sudden death in some cases.
  • Fever: Raised body temperature usually with other symptoms.
  • Folate-deficiency anemia: Folate-deficiency anemia is a blood condition characterized by low levels of folate in the body which leads to a reduction in the number of red blood cells. It is usually the result of a poor diet, malabsorption issues or the use of certain medications.
  • Giant cell myocarditis: A rare cardiovascular disease involving inflammation of the heart muscle. The condition occurs for no apparent reason.
  • Head symptoms: Symptoms affecting the head or brain
  • Heart block: is a disease in the electrical system of the heart
  • Heart cancer: A malignancy that is located in the heart
  • Heart failure: A condition which is characterized by an inability of the heart to pump blood efficiently and effectively
  • Heart rhythm symptoms: Problems with the rhythm of the heartbeat (arrhythmias)
  • Heart symptoms: Symptoms affecting the heart
  • Holt-Oram Syndrome: A rare inherited disorder characterized by hand, arm and heart abnormalities. Bone abnormalities usually affect the left arm more than the right and occasionally only one arm and/or hand is affected.
  • Hyperadrenalism: Excessive levels of adrenal hormones in the body. Symptoms depend on which hormone is involved and the degree of involvement. Adrenal hormones are aldosterone, corticosteroids, androgenic steroids, epinephrine and norepinephrine.
  • Hyperchromic Anemia: Hyperchromic anemia is a blood disorder characterized by red blood cells which contain abnormally high amounts of haemoglobin as well as a reduced number of red blood cells. This anomaly is often caused by such things as Vitamin B12 deficiency and pernicious anemia.
  • Hyperkalaemia: Increased concentration of potassium in the blood.
  • Hypersplenism: A condition which is characterized by the exaggeration of blood degrading function of the spleen
  • Hypokalaemia: Decreased concentration of potassium in the blood
  • Hypomagnesemia primary: Low blood magnesium levels which is caused by the abnormal absorption and excretion of the mineral and can be caused by such things as kidney problems and intestinal malabsorption.
  • Infection: Infections as a symptom.
  • Inherited spherocytic anemia: Inherited Spherocytic anemia is an inherited blood disorder characterized by red blood cells that are shaped like a sphere (spherocytes) rather than the normal doughnut shape. These abnormal cells are broken down prematurely resulting in a shortage of red blood cells (anemia).
  • Iron deficiency anemia: Iron-deficiency anemia is a blood condition characterized by low levels of iron in the body which leads to a reduction in the number of red blood cells.
  • Isoniazid-induced Sideroblastic anemia: Drug-induced sideroblastic anemia is a blood disorder caused by taking a drug called isoniazid. The body has sufficient iron levels but is unable to utilise it properly in red blood cells. The iron becomes abnormally deposited in red blood cells which make them unable to function properly.
  • Lyme disease: Lyme disease is an emerging infectious disease caused by at least three species of bacteria belonging to the genus Borrelia.
  • Macrocytic Hyperchromic Anemia: Macrocytic Hyperchromic anemia is a blood disorder characterized by abnormally large red blood cells which contain abnormally high amounts of haemoglobin. There is also a reduced number of red blood cells. This anomaly can be associated with such things as celiac disease or alcoholism.
  • Megalocytic-Normochromic anemia: Megalocytic-Normochromic is a blood disorder characterized by normal amounts of haemoglobin within abnormally large red blood cells. However, the number of red blood cells is low.
  • Menopause: End of female reproductive years
  • Methyldopa-induced Immune Hemolytic Anemia: Methyldopa-induced immune hemolytic anemia is a condition where use of a medication called Methyldopa triggers the body's immune system to destroy it's own red blood cells which results in anemia.
  • Microcytic Anemia: Microcytic anemia is a blood disorder characterized by small red blood cells (erythrocytes). The red blood cells are small due to a failure of haemoglobin synthesis or insufficient quantities of haemoglobin available. The blood disorder is usually caused by conditions such as iron deficiency, chronic diseases and thalassemias.
  • Microcytic Hyperchromic Anemia: Microcytic Hyperchromic anemia is a blood disorder characterized by abnormally small red blood cells which contain abnormally high amounts of haemoglobin. There is also a reduced number of red blood cells. This anomaly can be associated with such things as chronic infections and severe malnutrition.
  • Microcytic hypochromic anemia: Microcytic anemia is a blood disorder characterized by small red blood cells (erythrocytes) which have insufficient haemoglobin and hence have a reduced ability to carry oxygen through the body. The red blood cells are small due to a failure of haemoglobin synthesis or insufficient quantities of haemoglobin available. The blood disorder is usually caused by conditions such as iron deficiency, chronic diseases and thalassemias. The severity and range of symptoms is variable.
  • Microcytic-Normochromic anemia: Microcytic-Normochromic anemia is a blood disorder characterized by normal amounts of haemoglobin within small red blood cells. However the number of red blood cells is low.
  • Mitral-valve prolapse: A common heart condition that is often harmless.
  • Movement symptoms: Changes to movement or motor abilities
  • Muscle symptoms: Symptoms affecting the muscles of the body
  • Musculoskeletal chronic fatigue syndrome: Musculoskeletal chronic fatigue syndrome is a chronic condition which is characterized by symptoms such as severe persistent fatigue, depression, weakness, muscle pain and lack of energy. The condition is often debilitating and may be difficult to diagnose due to lack of specific tests for the condition. There is no known cause but it appears to be associated with a previous infection in some cases. Musculoskeletal chronic fatigue syndrome tends to be dominated by musculoskeletal symptoms.
  • Myocarditis: A condition which is characterized by inflammation of the muscles of the heart
  • Nerve symptoms: Symptoms affecting the nerves
  • Non-hereditary spherocytic anemia: Non-inherited spherocytic anemia is an acquired blood disorder characterized by red blood cells that are shaped like a sphere (spherocytes) rather than the normal doughnut shape. These abnormal cells are broken down prematurely resulting in a shortage of red blood cells (anemia). The blood condition may result from such things as acute, widespread burns to the body, low blood phosphate levels, Zieve's syndrome and toxins from poisonous snakes, spiders and insects.
  • Normocytic anemia: Normocytic anemia is a blood disorder characterized by red blood cells which are of a normal size but present in insufficient quantities. It is often associated with chronic diseases, blood loss, bone marrow problems and kidney disease. It can also be the result of an inherited condition.
  • Normocytic-Normochromic anemia: Megalocytic-Normochromic is a blood disorder characterized by normal amounts of haemoglobin within normal-sized red blood cells. However, the number of red blood cells is low. Conditions such as haemolytic anemia, liver disease and aplastic anemia may be associated with this blood disorder.
  • Nortriptyline -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Nortriptyline during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Nutritional Sideroblastic anemia: Nutritional sideroblastic anemia is a blood disorder caused insufficient quantities of pyridoxine or copper. The body has sufficient iron levels but is unable to utilise it properly in red blood cells due to the lack of pyridoxine or copper. The iron becomes abnormally deposited in red blood cells which make them unable to function properly.
  • Nutritional anemia: Nutritional anemia refers to a reduced red blood cell count due to a poor diet which is deficient in iron, folat and/or Vitamin B12.
  • Oleander poisoning: The oleander is a flowering shrub or small tree which bears clusters of flowers. The plant originated from Eurasia and is often used as an ornamental plant. The plant contains chemicals (cardiac glycosides: nerioside, oleandroside; saponins) which are very toxic if ingested. The plant is considered highly toxic and can result in death if sufficient quantities are eaten. The toxicity within a species can vary depending on the season. As little as seven leaves have been reported to cause poisoning symptoms. Poisoning can occur from inhaling smoke from burning oleander leaves.
  • Palpitations: Abnormality of the heart beat that person can feel
  • Penicillin-induced Immune Hemolytic Anemia: Penicillin-induced immune hemolytic anemia is a condition where use of a medication called Penicillin triggers the body's immune system to destroy it's own red blood cells which results in anemia.
  • Pericardial Mesothelioma: Pericardial mesothelioma, or mesothelioma of the pericardium, is a disease that affects the lining of the heart.
  • Periodic paralysis, potassium-sensitive, cardiodysrythmic type: A rare disorder where a genetic mutation causes periods of muscle weakness, heart rhythm abnormalities and various physical development abnormalities. It is believed to be caused by problems with the way the body utilizes potassium. Periodic paralysis may start as early as infancy or during the second decade and is triggered by exercise, stress or prolonged periods of rest.
  • Pernicious anemia: A megaloblastic anaemia due to malabsorption of the vitamin B12
  • Persistent patency of the arterial duct: A congenital heart defect wherein a child's arterial duct fails to close after birth.
  • Plant poisoning -- Digitalis glycoside: Digitalis glycoside is a toxin found naturally in plants such as the foxglove. The main symptoms of relatively mild poisoning are gastrointestinal and the effect on the heart usually results in changes in heart rate. Serious cases can result in symptoms such as convulsions and hallucinations.
  • Poikilocytic anemia: Poikilocytic anemia refers a blood disorder characterized by abnormally shaped red blood cells. The abnormal red blood cells may be destroyed prematurely resulting in anemia. The severity of the anemia and hence the severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Posthemorrhagic anemia: Posthemorrhagic anemia refers to a reduced number of red blood cells in the body due to bleeding.
  • Primary Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia: Primary autoimmune hemolytic anemia is characterized by an abnormal immune system response. The body's immune system produces antibodies against the body's own red blood cells which leads to the destruction of red blood cells and hence anemia. The secondary form of the condition is the result of an underlying condition such as lupus or hepatitis whereas the primary form has no underlying condition.
  • Primary Cold Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia: Primary cold autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a condition where the body's immune system triggers the production of antibodies against the body's own red blood cells. The process occurs only when the patient is exposed to temperatures colder the average body temperature. The red cells are destroyed at an abnormally rapid rate which leads to anemia. The primary form of the condition means that there is no underlying condition. The condition may develop gradually or occur suddenly and cause serious symptoms.
  • Pyridoxine deficiency-induced Sideroblastic anemia: Pyridoxine deficiency-induced sideroblastic anemia is a blood disorder caused insufficient quantities of pyridoxine. The body has sufficient iron levels but is unable to utilise it properly in red blood cells due to the lack of pyridoxine. The iron becomes abnormally deposited in red blood cells which make them unable to function properly.
  • Quinidine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Quinidine during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Quinidine-induced Immune Hemolytic Anemia: Quinidine-induced immune hemolytic anemia is a condition where use of a medication called Methyldopa triggers the body's immune system to destroy it's own red blood cells which results in anemia.
  • Respiratory failure: A condition which is due to marked impairment of respiratory function
  • Reye's syndrome: is a potentially fatal disease that causes numerous detrimental effects to many organs, especially the brain and liver
  • Ritalin abuse: Ritalin is a prescription drug used to treat ADHD. Some people use the drug illegitimately which can result in various unwanted symptoms.
  • Scleroderma: A rare, progressive connective tissue disorder involving thickening and hardening of the skin and connective tissue. There are a number of forms of scleroderma with some forms being systemic (involving internal organs).
  • Secondary Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia: Secondary autoimmune hemolytic anemia is characterized by an abnormal immune system response. The body's immune system produces antibodies against the body's own red blood cells which leads to the destruction of red blood cells and hence anemia. The secondary form of the condition is the result of an underlying condition such as lupus or hepatitis whereas the primary form has no underlying condition. The condition may develop gradually or occur suddenly and cause serious symptoms.
  • Secondary Cold Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia: Secondary cold autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a condition where the body's immune system triggers the production of antibodies against the body's own red blood cells. The process occurs only when the patient is exposed to temperatures colder the average body temperature. The red cells are destroyed at an abnormally rapid rate which leads to anemia. The secondary form of the condition means that it is the result of an underlying condition - it usually occurs after some sort of infection. The condition may develop gradually or occur suddenly and cause serious symptoms.
  • Short QT syndrome: A very rare inherited condition where the heart muscle recharges between beats faster than normal which can result in various symptoms and even sudden death.
  • Sick sinus syndrome: Heart rhythm disorder
  • Sickle Cell Anemia: Sickle cell anemia is an inherited blood disorder characterized by red blood cells which are crescent-shaped rather than the normal doughnut shape. These abnormally shaped red blood cells are unable to function normally and tend to undergo premature destruction which leads to anemia. If the genetic defect which causes the condition is inherited from both parents the condition can be quite severe whereas if it is inherited from only one parent, often there are no symptoms. The abnormally shaped red blood cells can cause problems when they clump together and block blood vessels.
  • Sideroblastic anemia: Sideroblastic anemia is a blood disorder where the body has sufficient iron levels but is unable to utilise it properly in red blood cells. The iron becomes abnormally deposited in red blood cells which make them unable to function properly. The condition may be inherited, acquired or secondary.
  • Sideroblastic anemia, hereditary: An inherited form of anemia where an enzyme deficiency prevents red blood cells from using iron properly. The red blood cells become overloaded with iron which impairs the blood's ability to carry oxygen.
  • Sideroblastic anemia, pyridoxine-responsive, autosomal recessive: Pyridoxine-responsive sideroblastic anemia is a rare inherited blood disorder characterized by abnormal deposits of iron in the red blood cells which makes them unable to function properly. The condition is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner and responds to treatment with pyridoxine.
  • Sideropenic anemia: Sideropenic anemia is a blood abnormality characterized by reduced iron levels in the plasma. It is a very common form of anemia.
  • Sinus arrhythmia: A condition which is characterized by any abnormality in the rate, regularity or sequence of the heart
  • Sleep apnea: A condition which is characterized by transient attacks of apnea that usually occur during ones sleep
  • Spherocytic anemia: Spherocytic anemia is a blood disorder characterized by red blood cells that are shaped like a sphere (spherocytes) rather than the normal doughnut shape. These abnormal cells are broken down prematurely resulting in a shortage of red blood cells (anemia). The condition may be inherited or acquired.
  • Status epilepticus: A condition which is characterized by a continuous series of generalized tonic clonic seizures
  • Sulphonamide -induced Immune Hemolytic Anemia: Sulphonamide-induced immune hemolytic anemia is a condition where use of a medication called Methyldopa triggers the body's immune system to destroy it's own red blood cells which results in anemia.
  • Sumatriptan -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Sumatriptan during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Tetraodon Poisoning: Food poisoning from Tetradons.
  • Thallium poisoning: The poisoning of a person with the element thallium
  • Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, acquired: A rare blood condition where small blood clots form in blood vessels which reduces the number of blood platelets and results in kidney failure, neurological symptoms and anemia. The condition may be familial or acquired - symptoms tend to recur regularly in the familial form.
  • Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, congenital: A rare blood condition where small blood clots form in blood vessels which reduces the number of blood platelets and results in kidney failure, neurological symptoms and anemia.
  • Thyrotoxicosis: hypermetabolic clinical syndrome resulting from serum elevations in thyroid hormone levels, specifically free thyroxine (T4), triiodothyronine (T3), or both.
  • Toxin-induced Sideroblastic anemia: Toxin-induced sideroblastic anemia is a blood disorder caused by toxins such as lead or zinc poisoning. The body has sufficient iron levels but is unable to utilise it properly in red blood cells. The iron becomes abnormally deposited in red blood cells which make them unable to function properly.
  • Trichinosis: Worm infection usually caught from pigs
  • Ventricular tachycardia: A condition which is characterized by a fast heart beat originates from the ventricles
  • Vitamin B12 Deficiency: A deficiency of Vitamin B12 primarily causes anemias the body is unable to make sufficient quantities of normal red blood cells. Severe cases can lead to permanent nervous system problems. The vitamin B12 deficiency can result from absorption problems, insufficient dietary intake, certain medications (e.g. metformin), inherited conditions (e.g. transcobalamin deficiency) and certain chronic parasitic intestinal infestations.
  • Warm Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia: Warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a condition where the body's immune system triggers the production of antibodies against the body's own red blood cells. The red cells are destroyed at an abnormally rapid rate which leads to anemia. Warm haemolytic anemia is characterized by the fact that the abnormal destruction of red blood cells is more active when the patient is exposed to warm temperatures. The severity of the condition varies depending on the underlying cause e.g. cytomegalovirus, hepatitis, HIV and lupus. The condition may develop gradually or occur suddenly and cause serious symptoms.
  • Whipple's Disease: Rare malabsorption disease from bacterial digestive infection
  • X-linked sideroblastic anaemia:
  • X-linked sideroblastic anemia: X-linked sideroblastic anemia is a rare inherited blood disorder characterized by abnormal deposits of iron in the red blood cells which makes them unable to function properly. The body continues to absorb more iron from digesting food in order to try and correct the problem but this simply leads to excessive iron being deposited in body tissues as the it can't use the iron properly. The severity of the condition is variable.
  • Yorifuji Okuno syndrome: A condition that is characterised by pancreatic insufficiency and heart disease

Conditions listing medical symptoms: Irregular heartbeat:

The following list of conditions have 'Irregular heartbeat' or similar listed as a symptom in our database. This computer-generated list may be inaccurate or incomplete. Always seek prompt professional medical advice about the cause of any symptom.

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Conditions listing medical complications: Irregular heartbeat:

The following list of medical conditions have 'Irregular heartbeat' or similar listed as a medical complication in our database.

 

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