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Symptoms » Joint symptoms » Glossary
 

Glossary for Joint symptoms

Medical terms related to Joint symptoms or mentioned in this section include:

  • 22q11.2 deletion syndrome: A rare genetic disorder caused by the absence of a small portion of genetic material. A small section of chromosome 22 is missing at a location called q11.2. Chromosome 22 is one of 23 pairs of chromosomes that exist in humans.
  • 3-M Syndrome: A rare genetic condition which is characterized by distinctive physical features and severe growth retardation that starts during the fetal stage. Intelligence is not affected.
  • 49,XXXXY syndrome: A rare sex chromosome abnormality where there are three extra copies of the X chromosome.
  • 7p2 Monosomy Syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder where there is one copy of the end of the short arm (p) of chromosome 7 rather than the normal two. The type and severity of symptoms is determined by the location and size of the genetic material deleted.
  • ALL-Down syndrome: The presence of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in Down syndrome patients. These patients tend to have a poorer prognosis for the leukemia than patients without Down syndrome.
  • Abdominal Cancer: Growth of abnormal cells (tumour) affecting the organs in the abdominal cavity; may be due to primary growth of a tumour or spread from another tumour (metastases, secondary tumour)
  • Abnormal carrying angle of elbow in children: Abnormal carrying angle of elbow in children is an abnormality of a child's elbow.
  • Absent abdominal musculature with microphthalmia and joint laxity: A rare disorder characterized mainly by small eyes, loose joints, a lack of abdominal muscles and facial anomalies.
  • Absent patellae -- scrotal hypoplasia -- renal anomalies -- facial dysmorphism -- mental retardation: A rare syndrome characterized by absent kneecaps, underdeveloped scrotum, kidney anomalies, unusual facial appearance and mental retardation.
  • Acanthocheilonemiasis: A rare tropical infection caused by a particular threadworm usually found in Africa. It may cause skin rashes, muscle and joint pains, neurologic disorders and skin lumps. The cerebrospinal fluid may also contain the larvae.
  • Achard syndrome: An inherited connective tissue disorder characterized primarily by a short head, long, slender bones, recessed lower jaw and loose hand and foot joints.
  • Achilles tendon stiff: tendon stiffness due to physical trauma or abnormal muscle contraction.
  • Aching joints: A sensation of aching located in the joints
  • Achondroplasia: A rare disease characterized by abnormal bone growth which results in short stature with short arms and legs, large head and characteristic facial features.
  • Acinic cell carcinoma: A usually slow-growing malignant tumor that that can occur in various parts of the body but is most often found in the pancreas, salivary glands, palate and upper lip. Symptoms are determined by the size and location of the growth.
  • Ackerman Dermatitis Syndrome: A rare condition characterized by the association of skin and joint symptoms. It is characterized by arthritis preceded by a skin rash (interstitial granulomatous dermatitis) which can vary in appearance from person to person. The condition tends to go through periods of flares and remission.
  • Acne: Pimples and blackheads on the skin
  • Acne-like behind-knee skin symptoms: reddish raised elevated patches on the skin behind the knee
  • Acne-like elbow skin symptoms: reddish raised elevated lesions on the elbow
  • Acne-like knee skin symptoms: acne is a disorder of the pilosebaceous unit. The inflammatory process varies from a papule, pustule to a nodule
  • Acrocephalosyndactyly type 3 (ACPS 3): A rare genetic disorder characterized by premature joining of certain skull bones during development which has an impact on the shape of the head and face. Features include brachycephaly, ear deformities as well as craniofacial, finger and bone abnormalities.
  • Acrodysostosis: A rare genetic disorder characterized by short hands, small nose, mental deficiency and hand and foot deformities.
  • Acrofacial dysostosis Rodriguez type: One of a group of disorders characterized by defective limb and facial development. The Rodriguez type is very rare and primarily involves severe limb and organ malformations.
  • Acrofacial dysostosis, Nager type: A rare genetic disorder characterized by underdeveloped thumbs, forearm and cheekbones as well as ear defects.
  • Acromegaloid hypertrichosis syndrome: A rare genetic condition characterized by excess body hair and a coarse face. The severity of the condition is variable.
  • Acromegaly: An abnormal enlargement of the limbs due to increased secretion of growth hormone after the cessation of puberty
  • Acromesomelic dysplasia: A rare genetic progressive skeletal disorder characterized by short limbs, a large head and lower thoracic kyphosis.
  • Acromesomelic dysplasia Brahimi Bacha type: A very rare genetic malformation syndrome characterized primarily by developmental abnormalities of the face and skeletal bones.
  • Acromesomelic dysplasia Hunter Thompson type: A rare genetic syndrome characterized by various severe developmental abnormalities of the skeletal bones.
  • Acromesomelic dysplasia, Maroteaux type: A rare genetic syndrome characterized by various developmental abnormalities of the skeletal bones and facial anomalies.
  • Acromicric dysplasia: A rare genetic syndrome characterized by various severe developmental abnormalities of the skeletal bones and facial anomalies.
  • Acromioclavicular separation: Separation of collarbone (clavicle) and the shoulder blade.
  • Acromioclavicular separation on both sides: Acromioclavicular separation (AC separation) on both sides is a type of should separation on both shoulders.
  • Acroosteolysis dominant type: A rare inherited connective tissue disorder characterized by breakdown of bone especially in the ends of the fingers and toes.
  • Actinomycosis: A chronic infection usually caused by an organism normally found in human bowels and mouths. The disease usually affects the face and neck and results in deep, lumpy abscesses that emit a grainy pus through multiple sinuses.
  • Acute Bokhoror: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. Death is common in the acute phase of the infection which can last from four days to four months.
  • Acute VE: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. Death is common in the acute phase of the infection which can last from four days to four months.
  • Acute Viliuisk Encephalitis: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. Death is common in the acute phase of the infection which can last from four days to four months.
  • Acute Viliuisk Encephalomyelitis: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. Death is common in the acute phase of the infection which can last from four days to four months.
  • Acute Vilyuisk Encephalitis: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. Death is common in the acute phase of the infection which can last from four days to four months.
  • Acute Vilyuisk Encephalomyelitis: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. Death is common in the acute phase of the infection which can last from four days to four months.
  • Acute acne-like behind-knee skin symptoms: reddish raised elevated patches on the skin behind the knee
  • Acute acne-like elbow skin symptoms: reddish raised elevated lesions on the elbow
  • Acute acne-like knee skin symptoms: acne is a disorder of the pilosebaceous unit. The inflammatory process varies from a papule, pustule to a nodule
  • Acute chronic joint pain: pain in the joints
  • Acute chronic knuckle pain: severe pain of the heads of the metacarpal bones
  • Acute elbow pain: conditions of the elbow which can cause acute pain for a long period of time
  • Acute erythroleukemia: A rare condition characterized by the presence of abnormal blood cells (erythroblastic precursors) in the bone marrow and blood. The condition is characterized by anemia and generally leads to the development of acute myelogenous leukemia. The acute form has more severe symptoms than the chronic form.
  • Acute gout: An acute condition which is caused by a disorder of purine or pyrimidine metabolism resulting in inflammatory arthritis
  • Acute gouty arthritis:
  • Acute ichthyosis-like behind-knee skin symptoms: rough and dry skin behind the knee
  • Acute ichthyosis-like elbow skin symptoms: rough elbow skin
  • Acute ichthyosis-like knee skin symptoms: rough skin on the knee
  • Acute injuries of both knees related to sports: Acute injuries of both knees related to sports is the sudden onset of sports-related trauma to the knees.
  • Acute injuries of the knee related to sports: The knee joint is the largest joint in the body, consisting of 4 bones and an extensive network of ligaments and muscles. Injuries to the knee joint are amongst the most common in sporting activities.
  • Acute lymphoblastic leukemia: A malignant disease that starts suddenly and progresses quickly. It is characterized by a high number of immature cells in the organs, bone marrow and blood. Symptoms include fever, pallor, anorexia, fatigue, anemia, hemorrhage, bone pain, splenomegaly and frequent infections. Also called acute lymphocytic leukemia.
  • Acute lymphoblastic leukemia, Susceptibility to: Cancer of the white blood cells characterized by the presence of excessive lymphoblasts. Precursors to white blood cells are called blasts and are made by the bone marrow but in ALL the blasts are abnormal and do not develop into lymphocytes. Instead, the abnormal blasts or leukemic cells multiply rapidly and reduce the level of other types of blood cells such as red blood cells and platelets. There are two subtypes of leukemia linked to a genetic anomaly which increases a person's susceptibility to developing the cancer. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome 10q21 and type 2 is linked to a defect on chromosome 7p12.2.
  • Acute lymphoblastic leukemia, Susceptibility to, 1: Cancer of the white blood cells characterized by the presence of excessive lymphoblasts. Precursors to white blood cells are called blasts and are made by the bone marrow but in ALL the blasts are abnormal and do not develop into lymphocytes. Instead, the abnormal blasts or leukemic cells multiply rapidly and reduce the level of other types of blood cells such as red blood cells and platelets. There are two subtypes of leukemia linked to a genetic anomaly which increases a person's susceptibility to developing the cancer. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome 10q21.
  • Acute lymphoblastic leukemia, Susceptibility to, 2: Cancer of the white blood cells characterized by the presence of excessive lymphoblasts. Precursors to white blood cells are called blasts and are made by the bone marrow but in ALL the blasts are abnormal and do not develop into lymphocytes. Instead, the abnormal blasts or leukemic cells multiply rapidly and reduce the level of other types of blood cells such as red blood cells and platelets. There are two subtypes of leukemia linked to a genetic anomaly which increases a person's susceptibility to developing the cancer. Type 2 is linked to a defect on chromosome 7p12.2.
  • Acute lymphoblastic leukemia, adult: Cancer of the white blood cells. Precursors to white blood cells are called blasts and are made by the bone marrow but in ALL the blasts are abnormal and do not develop into lymphocytes. Instead, the abnormal blasts or leukemic cells multiply rapidly and reduce the level of other types of blood cells such as red blood cells and platelets.
  • Acute myeloid leukemia: A form of rapidly progressing blood cancer resulting in the rapid proliferation of granulocytes and monocytes, red blood cells and platelets.
  • Acute non lymphoblastic leukemia: A form of rapidly progressing blood cancer resulting in the rapid proliferation of granulocytes and monocytes, red blood cells and platelets. It is one of the most common forms of leukemia in adults but can occur in children.
  • Acute pain in multiple joints: it could be in the form of pain and swelling
  • Acute promyelocytic leukemia: A rare bone marrow cancer characterized by a lack of mature blood cells and excessive amounts of immature blood cells (promyelocytes).
  • Acute prostatitis: An acute condition which affects the prostate which is the result of infammation
  • Acute psoriasis-like behind-knee rash: Psoriasis like plaques on the chest may be seen in a few cases such as
  • Acute psoriasis-like elbow rash: Psoriasis like plaques on the elbow may be seen in a few cases such as
  • Acute psoriasis-like knee rash: Psoriasis is a noncontagious skin disorder that most commonly appears as inflamed, edematous skin lesions covered with a silvery white scale. The most common type of psoriasis is plaque psoriasis. Psoriasis like plaques on the knee may be seen in a few cases such as
  • Acute rheumatic fever: Bacterial joint infection with risk of heart complications.
  • Adducted thumb syndrome recessive form: A rare recessively inherited disorder characterized mainly by a small head, arthrogryposis (joint contractures), cleft palate and various other abnormalities.
  • Adducted thumbs -- arthrogryposis, Christian type: A rare recessively inherited disorder characterized mainly by a small head, arthrogryposis (joint contractures), cleft palate and various other abnormalities.
  • Adenoviruses: Common viruses causing common cold and various other ailments.
  • Adrenal crisis: A potentially fatal condition where the adrenal cortex slows or stops functioning resulting in reduced glucocorticoids, decreased extracellular fluid volume and hyperkalemia. Symptoms include shock, coma, low blood pressure, weakness and loss of vasomotor tone. Also called addisonian crisis.
  • Adrenal gland hypofunction: Reduced adrenal gland activity due to damage to the adrenal gland or lack of stimulation of the gland. Pituitary hormones stimulate adrenal gland activity.
  • Adrenal hypofunction: A condition which is characterized by a lack of production of hormones from the adrenal gland.
  • Adult hypophosphatasia: An rare inherited bone disorder due to an inborn error of metabolism characterized by a deficiency of alkaline phosphate. The condition involves the early loss of primary teeth and childhood rickets followed by a reasonable health until mid-adulthood when dental and skeletal abnormalities again become prevalent.
  • Adult onset Still's disease: A form of Still's disease that has a later onset and involves arthralgia or arthritis and a characteristic rash that often appears during periods of temperature increase.
  • African Sleeping sickness: A disease caused by parasites (Trypanosome brucei gamiense or T. brucei rodesiense) and transmitted to humans by the tsetse fly which is found only in Africa. Causes symptoms such as fever, chills, headache, anemia, edema of hands and feet, enlarged lymph glands, lethargy, sleepiness, convulsions and coma. Also called African trypanosomiasis and sleeping sickness.
  • Agammaglobulinemia: A rare genetic disorder, which inhibits the normal growth of B cells and results in immunoglobulin deficiency.
  • Akesson syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized by excessive skin folds and furrows on the scalp, mental retardation the failure of the thyroid to develop.
  • Alcoholic liver disease: Alcoholic liver disease is the major cause of liver disease in Western countries, (in Asian countries, viral hepatitis is the major cause). It arises from the excessive ingestion of alcohol.
  • Alkaptonuria: A rare inherited metabolic disease characterized by homogentisic aciduria, arthritis and ochronosis. Symptoms include darkening of urine, alkinization due to overproduction of homogentisic acid, arthritis in the large joints and black ochronotic pigmentation of cartilage and collagen tissue. However, many of these symptoms may not occur until middle age. The condition may also be caused by chronic phenol poisoning.
  • Allain Babin Demarquez syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by premature fusion of skullbones, abnormal development of skeletal bones and hypertension.
  • Alopecia-contractures-dwarfism-mental retardation: A rare syndrome characterized primarily by mental retardation, short stature, lack of hair and contractures.
  • Alport Syndrome: A rare hereditary disorder involving the progressive deterioration of parts of the kidney resulting in chronic kidney disease.
  • American mountain fever: A viral disease transmitted through the bite of ticks (Rocky Mountain wood tick and American dog tick) who are infected with the virus. Because the virus infects blood cells including erythrocytes, transmission can also occur through transfusion with infected blood but this is uncommon. Infection is most common in Canada and parts of western US. The incubation period usually lasts between 3 and 6 days but can be as long as a few weeks. The virus tends to cause to periods of fever each lasting for a few days.
  • Amoebiasis: An infectious disease caused by a free-living amoebic parasite called Entamoeba histolytica. The organism infects the bowel and causes gastroenteritis. Infection occurs through ingesting contaminated food or water. It is more common in countries with poor sanitation. The incubation period may last from days to weeks before symptoms appear.
  • Ampola syndrome: A rare genetic disease characterized primarily by mental retardation, facial anomalies, short stature, seizures and finger and toe abnormalities.
  • Amyloidosis: A disease characterized by the accumulation of insoluble amyloid protein in tissues and organs which in turn affects the functioning of these tissues and organs.
  • Amyloidosis beta2-microglobulinic: Amyloidosis is a rare group of metabolic disorders where a protein called amyloid accumulates in body organs and tissues where it can cause damage. The type of amyloid protein involved in this type of amyloidosis is beta-2-microglobulin. The abnormal protein tends to be deposited in parts of the body such as joints, bones and carpal tunnel but can also be found in the gastrointestinal tract and other organs.
  • Amyoplasia: A rare condition characterized by congenital joint stiffness.
  • Anauxetic dysplasia: A rare disorder characterized by abnormal skeletal and spinal development.
  • Angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma: A form of cancer which tends to be systemic in nature and thus cancer cells can be found in various parts of the body such as the lymph nodes, liver, spleen, skin and bone marrow.
  • Angiokeratoma -- mental retardation -- coarse face: A rare inherited genetic syndrome characterized by mental retardation, coarse facial features and capillary hemangiomas.
  • Angioneurotic Edema: Involves swelling of deep skin layers and fatty tissues under the skin as well as the mucous membrane. The condition involves recurrent swelling of tissues, abdominal pain and swelling of the voice box. It is often caused by an allergic reaction to drugs or food. It is also called Quincke's disease, giant urticaria, Quincke's edema or angioedema.
  • Aniridia -- absent patella: A rare genetic condition characterized by an abnormal or missing kneecap as well as the absence of the iris of the eye.
  • Ankle Osteoarthritis: A form of arthritis where the cartilage which cushions the bones in the ankle joint as they move against each other, becomes progressively degraded and damaged. This causes problems such as pain, stiffness and impaired movement. Pain is not present in all cases however, with some patients imply suffering joint stiffness. Primary osteoarthritis occurs as the person ages but results from repetitive use and/or high mechanical stress on the joint. It is not a direct result of the aging process. Secondary osteoarthritis is the result of such things as injury to the joint, joint infection, obesity, ligament damage, joint overuse, hormonal problems, pregnancy and various other conditions. Family history seem to play a factor in developing the condition.
  • Ankle bleeding: The ankle joint is a synovial hinge joint that connects the distal ends of the tibia and fibula.
  • Ankle blister: The ankle joint is a synovial hinge joint that connects the distal ends of the tibia and fibula.
  • Ankle blueness: A blue discolouration of the ankle
  • Ankle bruise: A haematoma that occurs at the ankle.
  • Ankle burning sensation: A burning sensation located in the ankle
  • Ankle clonus: a rhythmic contraction of the calf muscles following a sudden dorsiflexion of the foot, the leg being semiflexed
  • Ankle coldness: A cold sensation occurring at the ankle
  • Ankle deformity: The ankle joint is a synovial hinge joint that connects the distal ends of the tibia and fibula.
  • Ankle fracture: Ankle fracture refers to a broken bone in the ankle.
  • Ankle infection: The ankle joint is a synovial hinge joint that connects the distal ends of the tibia and fibula.
  • Ankle inflammation: The ankle joint is a synovial hinge joint that connects the distal ends of the tibia and fibula.
  • Ankle itch: A sensation that causes a desire to scratch the skin of the ankle
  • Ankle lump: A palpable lesion located anatomically at or near the ankle joint
  • Ankle numbness: A loss of sensation located at or around the ankle region of the foot.
  • Ankle pain: Pain affecting the ankle joint
  • Ankle pain in children: Ankle pain in children is any discomfort or pain in the ankle of a child.
  • Ankle pain on both sides: Ankle pain on both sides refers to pain or discomfort in both ankles.
  • Ankle pain on one side: Ankle pain on one side is a condition in which there is discomfort or pain in one ankle.
  • Ankle paralysis: A loss of the motor and or sensory function of the ankle due to either a muscular or neural mechanism
  • Ankle paresthesia (tingling): A loss of sensation located at or around the ankle region of the foot.
  • Ankle paresthesia of both sides: Ankle paresthesia of both sides is a condition in which there is numbness, tingling or other abnormal sensations in both ankles.
  • Ankle paresthesia of one side: Ankle paresthesia of one side is a condition in which there is numbness, tingling or other abnormal sensations in one ankle.
  • Ankle rash: An eruption on the skin of the ankle.
  • Ankle redness: The ankle joint is a synovial hinge joint that connects the distal ends of the tibia and fibula. Most traumatic events involving the ankle result in ankle sprains.
  • Ankle spasm: A sudden involuntary contraction of the muscles surrounding the ankle joint.
  • Ankle sprain: Damage to the ankle ligaments.
  • Ankle stiffness: The ankle joint is a synovial hinge joint that connects the distal ends of the tibia and fibula. Most traumatic events involving the ankle result in ankle sprains.
  • Ankle swelling: Ankle swelling often from injury or fluid retention.
  • Ankle symptoms: Symptoms affecting the ankle
  • Ankle tingling/paresthesias: A tingling sensation located on the ankle.
  • Ankle ulcer: The ankle joint is a synovial hinge joint that connects the distal ends of the tibia and fibula.
  • Ankle weakness: A decrease in the usual strength of the movements of the ankle
  • Ankylosing Spondylitis: A form of chronic inflammation of the spine which may also affect joints in the shoulder, hip, neck, ribs and jaw. May result in loss of mobility. Also called Marie-Strumpell disease.
  • Ankylosis: Stiffness or fusion of a joint leading to loss of mobility.
  • Ankylosis -- facial anomalies -- pulmonary hypoplasia syndrome: A rare familial syndrome characterized mainly by fused or stiff joints, facial anomalies and underdeveloped lungs.
  • Anorexia Nervosa: A disorder where a distorted sense of body image leads to self-starvation to the point of death in some cases.
  • Ansell-Bywaters-Elderking syndrome: A rare familial syndrome characterized mainly by mental retardation, rash, eye inflammation and joint disease.
  • Anterior knee pain related to sports: The knee joint is the largest joint in the body, consisting of 4 bones and an extensive network of ligaments and muscles. Injuries to the knee joint are amongst the most common in sporting activities.
  • Anthrax: A serious infectious bacterial disease that can be fatal.
  • Antihypertensive drug allergy: Taking antihypertensive drugs (blood pressure-lowering drugs) can cause an allergic response in some people however this is considered rare. It involves the body's immune system overreacting to the drug. The type and severity of symptoms can vary considerable though skin symptoms are the most common allergic response to drugs.
  • Antithyroid arthritis syndrome: Arthritis caused by using antithyroid drugs to treat hyperthyroidism.
  • Antley-Bixler Syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by premature closing of skull bones, choanal atresia and craniofacial and limb abnormalities.
  • Antley-Bixler-like syndrome -- ambiguous genitalia -- disordered steroidogenesis: A rare genetic disorder involving a deficiency of an enzyme (cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase) which causes steroid abnormalities. The condition results in ambiguous genitalia in females due to excessive androgen during fetal growth. Patients can also have the bone symptoms of Antley-Bixler syndrome.
  • Aortic dilatation- joint hypermobility- arterial tortuosity: A rare syndrome characterized by the dilation of the aortic root, hyperextensible joints and varicose veins
  • Apricot seed poisoning: Apricot seeds contain a chemical called amygdalin which breaks down into cyanide in the human body. The toxic chemicals are not released if the pit remains intact and therefore poisoning usually occurs if the seeds are crushed and eaten. Accidental ingestion is very unusual. Most parts of the apricot plant contain the toxic chemical with the highest concentration in young leaves. Different species of apricots have different levels of toxic chemical. Severe symptoms or even death can occur if children consume more than ten kernels or adults consume more than forty kernels. Theories exist that apricot kernels may help cancer sufferers but there has been no scientific studies that have proven this.
  • Arbovirosis: An infectious disease caused by an arbovirus. The virus is transmitted by arthropods such as insects and ticks. Examples of arboviruses include Yellow Fever, Japanese encephalitis and tick-borne encephalitis. The symptoms may vary depending on the type of virus involved. The infection can lead to life-threatening brain inflammation.
  • Arthralgia: pain in the joints
  • Arthralgia -- purpura -- weakness syndrome: A rare autoimmune disorder characterized mainly by weakness, joint pain, reddish or purplish skin discolorations and a blood abnormality where cryoglobulins in the blood precipitate at low temperatures.
  • Arthralgia in lower limb: unilateral arthralgia
  • Arthralgia of both lower limbs: Bilateral arthralgia
  • Arthralgia similar to that in Inflammatory bowel disease: pain in the joints similar to that of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis
  • Arthralgia similar to that in rheumatoid arthritis: Pain in the joints similar to that of rheumatoid arthritis.
  • Arthritic signs: joint stiffness is one of the earliest sign of arthritis
  • Arthritis: A condition which is characterized by the inflammation of a joint
  • Arthritis -- short stature -- deafness: A very rare syndrome characterized by arthritis, short stature, deafness and numerous other abnormalities.
  • Arthritis in children:
  • Arthritis in multiple joints as in case of rheumatoid arthritis:
  • Arthritis in multiple joints in children:
  • Arthritis in single joint in children:
  • Arthritis, Gouty: Joint pain and inflammation (arthritis) caused by gout (buildup of urate crystals). The big toe is most commonly affected but other joints may also be affected e.g. foot, ankle, elbow, wrist, knee and fingers. Usually only one joint is affected at a time. The condition is most often seen in older men.
  • Arthritis-like conditions: Medical conditions highly related to or similar to arthritis.
  • Arthritis-like symptoms: A condition which is characterized by symptoms which mimic that of arthritis
  • Arthritis-related enthesitis: Inflammation of the entheses due to arthritis. The enthuses is the site at which the tendon or ligament attaches to the bone.
  • Arthrogryposis: A condition which is characterized by the persistent flexure of a joint
  • Arthrogryposis -- ophthalmoplegia -- retinopathy: A very rare syndrome characterized by congenital contractures of the hands and feet as well as eye problems.
  • Arthrogryposis -- renal dysfunction -- cholestasis syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized by joint contractures, kidney dysfunction and liver problems.
  • Arthrogryposis IUGR thoracic dystrophy: A very rare syndrome characterized by congenital joint contractures, intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) and ribcage abnormalities.
  • Arthrogryposis due to muscular dystrophy: A rare disorder where a non-progressive muscle disease results in the presence of multiple joint contractures at birth.
  • Arthrogryposis in children:
  • Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita neurogenic type: A rare non-progressive syndrome characterized by congenital contractures that originates from a nerve problem (spinal motor neuron depletion).
  • Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita type 2B: A form of distal arthrogryposis (joint contractures in ends of limbs) that also involves craniofacial abnormalities.
  • Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita, distal, X-linked: A rare condition characterized by the presence of contractures at birth as well as various other anomalies. The condition is X-linked.
  • Arthrogryposis multiplex with deafness, inguinal hernias, and early death: A rare syndrome characterized multiple joint contractures throughout the body, deafness, inguinal hernias and death usually within months of birth.
  • Arthrogryposis, congenital -- myopathic seizures: A rare syndrome characterized by mental retardation and muscle problems.
  • Arthrogryposis, distal, type 2A: A form of distal arthrogryposis (joint contractures in ends of limbs) that involves additional symptoms such as facial and spinal anomalies.
  • Arthrogryposis, distal, type 2B: A form of distal arthrogryposis (joint contractures in ends of limbs) that also involves craniofacial abnormalities.
  • Arthrogryposis-like disorder: A rare disorder characterized by joint contractures of the knees and ankles resulting in wasting or overgrowth of nearby muscles.
  • Arthropathies: disorders of the joints
  • Arthropathies similar to that in inflammatory bowel disease: disorders of the joints
  • Arthropathy, Neurogenic: Joint destruction caused by damage to the nervous system which prevents the patient feeling sensations in the joint. Due to the nerve damage, pain and damage to the joint often goes unnoticed as the joint deteriorates even further. The knee and ankle are the most common joints affected. The condition is usually caused by an underlying diseases which affects the nerves e.g. diabetic neuropathy, syringomyelia, spinal cord injury and pernicious anemia.
  • Arthropathy, progressive pseudorheumatoid, of childhood: A form of progressive rheumatoid arthritis that affects children.
  • Asian Dendorlimus pini caterpillar poisoning: A chronic illness caused by contact with certain a poisonous caterpillar called Dendorlimus pini. Contact with the cocoon can also cause symptoms. These caterpillars can be found in Asia, north Africa and eastern Europe.
  • Aspartylglucosaminidase deficiency: A rare glycoprotein metabolism disorder caused by a deficiency of an enzyme called aspartylglucosaminidase. Patients tend to develop normally during the first few years of life and development continues slowly until adolescence when mental retardation becomes progressively worse.
  • Aspartylglucosaminuria: A rare glycoprotein metabolism disorder caused by a deficiency of an enzyme called aspartylglucosaminidase. Patients tend to develop normally during the first few years of life and development continues slowly until adolescence when mental retardation becomes progressively worse.
  • Aspartylglycosaminuria: A rare glycoprotein metabolism disorder caused by a deficiency of an enzyme called aspartylglucosaminidase. Patients tend to develop normally during the first few years of life and development continues slowly until adolescence when mental retardation becomes progressively worse.
  • Aspergillosis: Infection with a fungus called Aspergillus.
  • Atkin-Flatiz syndrome: A rare, X-linked syndrome characterized mainly by mental retardation and facial anomalies.
  • Atrial myxoma, familial: An atrial myxoma benign tumor that develops in the wall that separates the two upper chambers of the heart. The familial form of the condition also involves tumors in other parts of the body such as the skin, both heart atria or the heart ventricles.
  • Aural atresia -- multiple congenital anomalies -- mental retardation: A rare syndrome characterized by a number of malformations as well as mental retardation.
  • Austrian syndrome: A condition where alcoholism is associated with heart failure and pneumococcal meningitis.
  • Autoimmune Hemophilia: Hemophilia caused by an autoimmune reaction
  • Autoimmune Hepatitis: Liver inflammation caused due to autoimmune processes where the body's immune system attacks the liver.
  • Autoimmune Vasculitis: A inflammation of the blood vessels caused by an autoimmune reaction
  • Autoimmune thyroid disease associated Celiac Disease: Patients with autoimmune thyroid disease are more susceptible to developing celiac disease than the average population. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Avascular necrosis: Bone death from lack of circulation.
  • Axenfeld-Rieger anomaly -- hydrocephaly -- skeletal abnormalities: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by skeletal abnormalities, excess fluid inside the skull and eye anomalies.
  • Bacterial diseases: Diseases caused by a bacterial infection
  • Bannayan-Zonana syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by macrocephaly, intestinal polyposis, pigmentation of penis and benign tumor-like growths.
  • Baraitser burn fixen syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by skeletal abnormalities, a skin disorder and an expressionless face.
  • Barbiturate abuse: Abuse of barbiturate medications
  • Barmah Forest virus: Mosquito-borne virus in parts of Australia
  • Bartonella infections: Infection with bacteria from the Bartonella genus of bacteria. Specific bacteria from within this group are Bartonella bacilliforms (Oroya fever), Bartonella Heneslae (Cat-scratch disease). Other conditions caused by this bacteria are endocarditis, bacteremia and angiomatosis. Symptoms vary depending on the type of bacteria involved and the severity of the infection - immunocompromised patients face greater risk of severe infection.
  • Bartonellosis: An infection by Bartonella bacilliformis which is transmitted through sandfly bites. Symptoms include fever, severe anemia, bone pain and skin lesions. Also called Carrion's disease, Oroya fever or verruga peruana.
  • Bartonellosis due to Bartonella quintana infection: A disease caused by infection with Bartonella quintana which are transmitted by the body louse. It causes trench fever but may also result in septicemia and endocarditis in patients with a weakened immune system.
  • Basal ganglia disease, biotin-responsive: A neurological disease that affects the part of the brain called the basal ganglia. The disease responds well to biotin administration but relapses within a month if the biotin is stopped. If the condition is diagnosed late or there are recurring episodes, the patient may suffer ongoing symptoms such as paraparesis, mild mental retardation or dystonia.
  • Bearn-Kunkel syndrome: A type of autoimmune liver disease characterized by liver damage, very high blood gammaglobulin levels and increased plasma cells.
  • Behcet's syndrome: Recurring inflammation of small blood vessels affecting various areas.
  • Behind knee itch: A sensation thatcauses a desire to scratch the skin behind the knee
  • Behind knee lump: A palpable lesion located anatomically behind the knee
  • Behind knee pain: A feeling of distress and agonycaused by the stimulation of pain nerve endings behind the knee
  • Behind knee rash: An eruption on the skin behind the knee.
  • Behind knee swelling: Swelling behind the knee
  • Bentham-Driessen-Hanveld syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by the association of undescended testes, long thin fingers and mental retardation.
  • Beriberi: Disease due to vitamin B1 deficiency (thiamine)
  • Bernard syndrome: A familial condition characterized by acute anemia, jaundice, hemoglobinuria and destruction of red blood cells. Acute symptoms may follow an episode of fever, abdominal pain, vomiting, malaise and joint pain.
  • Bernheim's syndrome: Reduced size of right heart ventricle due to enlargement of the left ventricle which encroaches on the space in the right ventricle. Blood flow from the right atrium to the right ventricle is obstructed.
  • Besnier-Boeck-Schaumann disease: A rare disease where inflammatory granular nodules form in various organs.
  • Bessel-Hagen disease: A dominantly inherited disorder characterized by growth of multiple tumors made up of cartilage on the bones.
  • Bethlem myopathy: A rare, slow-progressing, genetic muscle disorder where the muscle gradually weaken and become wasted.
  • Big toe stiff: Inability to contract the muscles of the big toe.
  • Biliary cirrhosis: Biliary cirrhosis is a condition where the bile ducts are unable to transport bile effectively due to blockage, inflammation, scarring or some other damage to the bile ducts. The condition may result from such things as congenital defect of the bile ducts (e.g. biliary atresia), cystic fibrosis, gallstones or a variety of other secondary conditions. The cause of primary biliary cirrhosis is not fully understood.
  • Bird cherry seed poisoning: Wild cherry seeds contain a chemical called amygdalin which breaks down into cyanide in the human body. The toxic chemicals are not released if the seed remains intact and therefore poisoning usually occurs if the seeds are crushed and eaten. Accidental ingestion is very unusual.
  • Bird flu (avian influenza): Bird flu refers to influenza A invection. Influenza A is a viral respiratory infection that can usually occurs in birds (especially poultry) but can be transmitted to humans and cause serious illness. The virus is contagious and can cause severe illness especially in patients who are very young or old or have some other medical condition as well. The severity of symptoms can vary but usually involves respiratory and constitutional (e.g. headache, aching muscles) symptoms. The influenza virus can mutate and produce different strains though the symptoms are the same. This frequent mutation means that people need regular vaccinations to ensure they are protected against new strains as they arise.
  • Bitter almond seed poisoning: Bitter almond seeds contain a chemical called amygdalin which breaks down into cyanide in the human body. Accidental ingestion is very unusual. Bitter almond plants grow mainly in Northern America. Various processes can be used to leach the toxic chemical out of the bitter almonds.
  • Blastomycosis: A fungal infection caused by Blastomyces dermatitidis and resulting in lung, skin, bone and genitourinary involvement.
  • Bone and cartilage tumors: Any tumors affecting the bones or cartilage, including both cancerous and benign tumors.
  • Bone dysplasia -- corpus callosum agenesis: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by abnormal brain development and bone growth abnormalities.
  • Bone symptoms: Symptoms affecting the body's bones
  • Borreliosis: An infectious bacterial disorder that is transmitted by ticks and causes skin rashes joint swelling and other symptoms similar to the flu.
  • Bortonneuse fever: A mild infectious disease caused by the bacterium Rickettsia Conorrii. The disease is transmitted by a dog tick (Riphicephalus sanguineus) and is most common in countries bordering the Mediterranean Sea. Incubation usually takes about one week.
  • Bouillaud's syndrome: Heart inflammation caused by rheumatism. The inner lining of the heart (endocardium) as well as the membrane surrounding the heart (pericardium) become inflamed.
  • Boutonneuse fever: An infectious disease that is caused by Rickettsia conorii which is transmitted by the brown dog tick (Rhipicephalus sanguineus). The disease occurs predominantly in Mediterranean areas such as India and Africa. The onset of symptoms is usually sudden and the incubation period is usually between 6 and 10 days.
  • Bowel bypass syndrome: Negative effects such as chills, fever, jont pain and skin inflammation that may result from bowel bypass surgery.
  • Bowel-associated dermatosis-arthritis syndrome: An illness that sometimes occurs in people with gastrointestinal diseases. It is believed to be caused by a build up of bacteria in a pouch in the bowel which triggers the immune system into action.
  • Boylan-Dew-Greco syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized primarily by insufficient myelination of peripheral nerves and contractures at birth. The myelin sheath is a protective coating around nerves.
  • Brachial Plexus Injury: Damage to the nerves controlling the shoulder and arm (often from childbirth).
  • Brachydactylous dwarfism, Mseleni type: A very rare syndrome characterized primarily by progressive joint disease, short stature and short fingers and toes. The joint disease affects mainly the hips, knees, ankles and spine. The condition can eventually lead to disability and hip and/or knee replacements in serious cases.
  • Brachydactyly -- tibial hypoplasia: A rare syndrome characterized by short digits and an underdeveloped or absent shin bone.
  • Brain -- bone -- fat: A rare inherited disease characterized by bone cysts and progressive presenile dementia.
  • Brill disease: A form of recurring typhus caused by a bacterium called Rickettsia prowazekii and transmitted by lice. The illness may occur years after the initial sickness and tends to be not as severe.
  • Brill-Zinsser disease: Reoccuring mild form of typhus.
  • Brodie knee: Chronic inflammation of the knee joint.
  • Broken elbow: Fracture at the elbow joint
  • Brucellosis: An infectious disease caused by the Brucella genus which is transmitted from animals to humans.
  • Bruch's disease: An infectious disease that is caused by Rickettsia conorii which is transmitted by the brown dog tick (Rhipicephalus sanguineus). The disease occurs predominantly in Mediterranean areas such as India and Africa. The onset of symptoms is usually sudden and the incubation period is usually between 6 and 10 days.
  • Brudzinski's sign: A symptom which occurs in meningitis when flexion of the neck causes flexion of the hip and knee
  • Bullous systemic lupus erythematosus: A blistering disease that can develop in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The process is mediated by autoantibodies.
  • Burkholderia pseudomallei: Gram negative, aerobic, motile rod shaped bacterium.
  • Bursitis: inflammation of one or more bursae (small sacs) of synovial fluid in the body.
  • Bursitis in both arms:
  • Bursitis of one arm:
  • Burst of intense pain: Sudden episodes of pain
  • CFS subtype 1 (cognitive, musculoskeletal, sleep, anxiety/depression): Chronic fatigue syndrome is a chronic condition which is characterized by symptoms such as severe persistent fatigue, depression, weakness, muscle pain and lack of energy. The condition is often debilitating and may be difficult to diagnose due to lack of specific tests for the condition. There is no known cause but it appears to be associated with a previous infection in some cases. CFS subtype 1 tends to be more severe with the dominant symptoms being anxiety, depression and cognitive, musculoskeletal and sleeping problems.
  • CFS subtype 2 ( musculoskeletal, pain, anxiety/depression): Chronic fatigue syndrome is a chronic condition which is characterized by symptoms such as severe persistent fatigue, depression, weakness, muscle pain and lack of energy. The condition is often debilitating and may be difficult to diagnose due to lack of specific tests for the condition. There is no known cause but it appears to be associated with a previous infection in some cases. CFS subtype 2 tends to be more severe with the dominant symptoms being anxiety, depression, pain and musculoskeletal problems.
  • CFS subtype 3 (mild): Chronic fatigue syndrome is a chronic condition which is characterized by symptoms such as severe persistent fatigue, depression, weakness, muscle pain and lack of energy. The condition is often debilitating and may be difficult to diagnose due to lack of specific tests for the condition. There is no known cause but it appears to be associated with a previous infection in some cases. CFS subtype 3 tends to have milder symptoms than other subtypes.
  • CFS subtype 4 (cognitive, musculoskeletal, sleep, anxiety/depression): Chronic fatigue syndrome is a chronic condition which is characterized by symptoms such as severe persistent fatigue, depression, weakness, muscle pain and lack of energy. The condition is often debilitating and may be difficult to diagnose due to lack of specific tests for the condition. There is no known cause but it appears to be associated with a previous infection in some cases. CFS subtype 4 tends to be dominated by cognitive symptoms.
  • CFS subtype 5 (musculoskeletal, gastrointestinal): Chronic fatigue syndrome is a chronic condition which is characterized by symptoms such as severe persistent fatigue, depression, weakness, muscle pain and lack of energy. The condition is often debilitating and may be difficult to diagnose due to lack of specific tests for the condition. There is no known cause but it appears to be associated with a previous infection in some cases. CFS subtype 5 tends to be dominated by musculoskeletal and gastrointestinal symptoms.
  • CFS subtype 6 (postexertional): Chronic fatigue syndrome is a chronic condition which is characterized by symptoms such as severe persistent fatigue, depression, weakness, muscle pain and lack of energy. The condition is often debilitating and may be difficult to diagnose due to lack of specific tests for the condition. There is no known cause but it appears to be associated with a previous infection in some cases. CFS subtype 6 tends to be dominated by excessive fatigue following exertion.
  • CFS subtype 7 (pain, infectious, musculoskeletal, sleep, neurological, gastrointestinal, neurocognitive, anxiety/depression): Chronic fatigue syndrome is a chronic condition which is characterized by symptoms such as severe persistent fatigue, depression, weakness, muscle pain and lack of energy. The condition is often debilitating and may be difficult to diagnose due to lack of specific tests for the condition. There is no known cause but it appears to be associated with a previous infection in some cases. CFS subtype 7 tends to be more severe with the dominant symptoms being pain, infections, anxiety, depression and musculoskeletal, sleep, neurological, gastrointestinal and neurocognitive problems.
  • CRMO, juvenile: A rare chronic inflammatory bone disease that occurs in children. The symptoms go into periods of remission only to return. The most common sites for the inflammation are the shinbone, thighbone and collarbone with usually several sites being affected at once.
  • Calcaneal bone stiff: Stiffness of the heel movement.
  • Camptodactyly: A flexion deformity of the finger where the finger is bent and unable to straighten.
  • Camptodactyly, tall stature, and hearing loss syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by camptodactyly, tall stature and hearing loss. The hearing loss starts at birth or during infancy and progresses during childhood resulting in mild to severe hearing impairment.
  • Campylobacter food poisoning: Common bacterial infection usually from chicken.
  • Camurati-Engelmann Disease: A very rare genetic disease thickening of areas of bone causing pain, weakness and wasting. Usually affects the legs during childhood. Also called diaphyseal dysplasia.
  • Cantu syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by mental retardation, short stature, large skull, heart anomaly and various other abnormalities.
  • Caplan's syndrome: Scarring and inflammation of lungs in people with rheumatoid arthritis who have also had exposure to coal dust. Also called rheumatoid pneumoconiosis.
  • Capnocytophaga: A bacterial infection caused by Capnocytophaga canimorsus which is often found in normal healthy cats and dogs. The infections tends to occur mainly in immunocompromised patients, alcoholics or patients who have chronic respiratory disease or have had their spleen removed. The eyes are particularly sensitive to this infection. The incubation period can be as long as eight days.
  • Carcinoid syndrome: Carcinoid heart disease is a rare, metastatic disease that occurs predominantly in the right heart. The tricuspid and pulmonic valves are affected, leading to right heart failure, which results in increased morbidity and mortality.
  • Cardiomyopathy: A condition characterized by an increase in the size of the heart
  • Cardiomyopathy -- hypogonadism -- metabolic anomalies: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by heart muscle disease, hypogonadism, blindness, deafness and metabolic anomalies. Puberty was normal despite the hypogonadism.
  • Cardiomyopathy -- spherocytosis: A rare disorder characterized by the association of spherocytosis with heart muscle disease. Spherocytosis is a red blood cell disorder where the red blood cells have abnormal membranes which gives them a spherical shape and makes them weak resulting in their premature death.
  • Cardiomyopathy cataract hip spine disease: A rare genetic disorder characterized by heart muscle disease, cataracts and hip and spinal problems.
  • Cardiomyopathy due to anthracyclines: Damage to the heart muscle caused by anthracycline drugs which are used in chemotherapy. The damage occurs more frequently with higher cumulative doses. Often the patients have no symptoms of the heart damage for many year.
  • Cardiomyopathy, Alcoholic: A weakened heart mucle due to excessive alcohol consumption. Symptoms are usually not evident until the heart becomes severely damaged.
  • Cardiomyopathy, familial dilated: An inherited form of heart muscle disease where the heart ventricles become dilated which affects the hearts ability to function normally.
  • Carnevale-Canun-Mendoza syndrome: A rare disorder characterized by loss of bone tissue in the wrists and ankles as well as kidney problems.
  • Carpal deformity -- micrognathia -- microstomia: A very rare syndrome characterized by wrist bone defects, a small jaw and a small mouth.
  • Carpotarsal osteochondromatosis: A rare disorder characterized by a painless swelling in the ankles and wrists which restricts their range of motion. The swelling is caused by abnormal growths on the wrist and ankle bones. The number of joints involved is variable.
  • Cartilage conditions: Medical conditions affecting the cartilage.
  • Cartilage disorders: Diseases of the cartilage
  • Cartilaginous -- arthritic -- ophthalmic -- deafness syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by the association of eye, joint and cartilage disease as well as deafness.
  • Castellani syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by fever, arthritis and enlarged kidney and liver. The fever may fluctuate or come and go. It is most often seen in middle aged males.
  • Cat Eye Syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder involving abnormalities of chromosome 22 and characterized by coloboma of the iris, down-slanting palpebral fissures and anal atresia.
  • Cat scratch disease: An infectious disease transmitted through a cat's bite, scratch or lick and resulting primarily in lymph node pain and swelling. The condition can be mild or severe.
  • Celiac Disease: Digestive intolerance to gluten in the diet.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 1: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 6p21.3. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 10: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 3q25-q26. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 11: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 3q28. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 12: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 6q25.3. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 13: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect in the SH2B3 gene on chromosome 12q24. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 2: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 5q31-q33. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 3: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 2q33. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 4: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 19p13.1. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 5: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 15q11-q13. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 6: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 4q27. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 7: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 1q31. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 8: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 2q11-q12. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 9: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 3p21. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Charcot disease: Charcot joint occurs in the presence of sensory or autonomic neuropathy and presents as progressive microtrauma resulting in joint destruction and deformity. It characteristically occurs in weight bearing joints such as the foot, ankle and knee.
  • Charcot joint: Charcot joint occurs in the presence of sensory or autonomic neuropathy and presents as progressive microtrauma resulting in joint destruction and deformity. It characteristically occurs in weight bearing joints such as the foot, ankle and knee.
  • Chemical allergy: A chemical allergy refers to an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a chemical. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients depending on the type and duration of the exposure and individual response.
  • Chemical poisoning: Morbid condition caused by chemical.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Glaze: Glazes are used to put a shiny finish on various surfaces such as pottery. Glazes contain chemicals such as lead and zinc oxide which can cause serious symptoms if sufficient quantities are eaten. The chemicals cause damage to the gastrointestinal lining and the damage may continue for weeks after the poison was ingested. Death can result in severe cases. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Molybdenum: Molybdenum is a chemical used mainly in steel alloys lubricants. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Solder: Solder contains various chemicals and heavy metals which can cause serious symptoms if sufficient quantities are swallowed. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Vinyl Choride: Vinyl Choride is an intermediate chemical used in the manufacturing process of a variety of products: polyvinyl chloride, pipes, wire coverings, vehicle plastics, rubber, paper, furniture and glass. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Cherry laurel seed poisoning: Wild cherry seeds contain a chemical called amygdalin which breaks down into cyanide in the human body. The toxic chemicals are not released if the seed remains intact and therefore poisoning usually occurs if the seeds are crushed and eaten. Accidental ingestion is very unusual. Wild cherry plants grow mainly in eastern Europe, Western Asia and Britain.
  • Cherry seed poisoning: Cherry seeds contain a chemical called amygdalin which breaks down into cyanide in the human body. The toxic chemicals are not released if the seed remains intact and therefore poisoning usually only occurs if the seeds are crushed and eaten. Accidental ingestion is very unusual.
  • Chickenpox: Common viral infection.
  • Chikungunya: A rare viral disease usually transmitted by mosquitoes and characterized by fever, rash and severe arthritis.
  • Chokecherry seed poisoning: Chokecherry seeds contain a chemical called amygdalin which breaks down into cyanide in the human body. The toxic chemicals are not released if the seed remains intact and therefore poisoning usually occurs if the seeds are crushed and eaten. Accidental ingestion is very unusual. Chokecherry plants grow mainly in Northern America.
  • Chondrocalcinosis: A rare inherited metabolic disorder where the chemical calcium pyrophosphate dihyrdate is deposited in one or more joints in the body - usually the knee is affected.
  • Chondrocalcinosis 1: A very rare genetic disorder characterized by progressive osteoarthritis which starts relatively early and is progressive. Joint damage is caused by deposits of crystals containing calcium.
  • Chondrocalcinosis 2: A very rare genetic disorder characterized by progressive osteoarthritis. Joint damage is caused by deposits of crystals containing calcium.
  • Chondrocalcinosis familial articular: A very rare genetic disorder characterized by osteoarthritis which starts relatively early and is progressive. Joint damage is caused by deposits of crystals containing calcium.
  • Chondrodysplasia punctata: An inherited skeletal abnormality where bone calcifications near joints and other disorders result in growth retardation, short limbs, cataracts and an abnormal nose shape. Also called chondrodystrophia calcificans congenital or congenital stippled epiphyses.
  • Chondrodysplasia, type Nance-Sweeney: A very rare condition characterized mainly by bone malformations, hearing loss and facial anomalies.@
  • Chondroectodermal dysplasia: An inherited skeletal dysplasia marked that results in short-limbed dwarfism, development of an extra finger as well as cardiovascular impairments. Also called Ellis-van Creveld syndrome.
  • Chondromalacia: Softening of cartilage.
  • Chondrosarcoma: Chondrosarcoma is the second most frequent primary malignant tumor of bone, representing approximately 25% of all primary osseous neoplasms. Chondrosarcomas are a group of tumors with highly diverse features and behavior patterns, ranging from slow-growing non-metastasizing lesions to highly aggressive metastasizing sarcomas.
  • Christian's syndrome 1: A rare recessively inherited syndrome characterized by premature skull fusion, cleft palate, permanently flexed fingers and various other anomalies.
  • Chromosome 1, monosomy 1q4: A rare chromosomal disorder where deletion of a portion of chromosome 1 causes various abnormalities such as facial dysmorphism, retarded fetal growth, seizures, mental retardation, testicular problems and kidney defects.
  • Chromosome 10p terminal deletion syndrome: A very rare syndrome caused by a chromosomal defect (10p terminal deletion) and can result in a variety of malformations that are similar to DiGeorge syndrome and velocardiofacial syndrome.
  • Chromosome 12, Isochromosome 12p Mosaic: A very rare disorder genetic disorder involving abnormalities in chromosome 12. The severity of symptoms is variable and tends to include a wide range of defects and abnormalities.
  • Chromosome 12p tetrasomy syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder where there are four copies of the short arm (p) of chromosome 12 rather than the normal two resulting in various abnormalities.
  • Chromosome 15q duplication syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder involving an extra copy of genetic material from the long arm of chromosome 15. The type and severity of symptoms are determined by the amount and location of the duplicated genetic material.
  • Chromosome 15q, trisomy: A rare chromosomal disorder involving an extra copy of genetic material from the long arm of chromosome 15. The type and severity of symptoms are determined by the amount and location of the duplicated genetic material.
  • Chromosome 18, Tetrasomy 18p: A rare chromosomal disorder where there are four copies of short arm of chromosome 18 instead of the normal two which results in various genital, kidney, digital, head and face abnormalities.
  • Chromosome 21 monosomy: A rare chromosomal disorder where there is only one copy of chromosome 21 instead of the normal two leading to various abnormalities.
  • Chromosome 21q deletion syndrome: A rare genetic disorder where a portion of the genetic material from the long arm of chromosome 21 is missing. The symptoms or severity may vary somewhat between patients.
  • Chromosome 22q deletion: A rare genetic disorder where a portion of the genetic material from the long arm of chromosome 22 is missing. The symptoms or severity may vary somewhat between patients.
  • Chromosome 22q deletion syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder where the long arm of chromosome 22 is deleted resulting in various abnormalities.
  • Chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome: A rare genetic disorder caused by the absence of a small portion of genetic material. A small section of chromosome 22 is missing at a location called q11.2. Chromosome 22 is one of 23 pairs of chromosomes that exist in humans.
  • Chromosome 3, monosomy 3p25: A rare chromosomal disorder characterized by mental retardation, short stature, deafness, extra digits, facial anomalies and various other abnormalities.
  • Chromosome 3, monosomy 3q13: A rare chromosomal disorder characterized by a range of abnormalities including facial anomalies, kidney dysfunction, large head, small penis and impaired joint mobility.
  • Chromosome 6, monosomy 6q: A rare chromosomal disorder where a part of the long arm (q) of chromosome 6 is deleted resulting in various abnormalities depending on the location and length of missing genetic material.
  • Chromosome 6q deletion syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder where a part of the long arm (q) of chromosome 6 is deleted resulting in various abnormalities depending on the location and length of missing genetic material.
  • Chromosome 7, Monosomy 7p2: A rare chromosomal disorder where there is one copy of the end of the short arm (p) of chromosome 7 rather than the normal two. The type and severity of symptoms is determined by the location and size of the genetic material deleted.
  • Chromosome 7, terminal 7p deletion: A rare chromosomal disorder where there is one copy of the end of the short arm (p) of chromosome 7 rather than the normal two. The type and severity of symptoms is determined by the location and size of the genetic material deleted.
  • Chromosome 7, trisomy 7q: A rare chromosomal disorder involving duplication of the long arm (q) of chromosome 7 which results in various abnormalities depending on the size and location of the portion of duplicated genetic material.
  • Chromosome 7q duplication syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder involving duplication of the long arm (q) of chromosome 7 which results in various abnormalities depending on the size and location of the portion of duplicated genetic material.
  • Chromosome 8 trisomy syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder where there are three copies of chromosome 8 rather than the normal two which results in various abnormalities.
  • Chromosome 8, trisomy: A rare chromosomal disorder where there are three copies of chromosome 8 rather than the normal two which results in various abnormalities. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount and exact location of the genetic material that is duplicated.
  • Chromosome 8p inverted duplication syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder involving the inverted duplication of the short arm (p) of chromosome 8 resulting in three copies of the genetic material instead of the normal two. The type and severity of symptoms is determined by the location and size of the duplication.
  • Chromosome 8q deletion syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder where a part of the long arm (q) of chromosome 8 is deleted resulting in various abnormalities depending on the location and length of missing genetic material.
  • Chromosome 9, Tetrasomy 9p: A rare chromosomal disorder where there is four copies of the short arm of chromosome 9 instead of the normal two resulting in various abnormalities.
  • Chromosome 9, trisomy 9q: A very rare genetic disorder where a portion of the genetic material on the long arm (q) of chromosome 9 is duplicated which results in various abnormalities. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the size and location of the genetic material involved.
  • Chromosome 9p tetrasomy syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder where there is four copies of the short arm of chromosome 9 instead of the normal two resulting in various abnormalities.
  • Chromosome 9q duplication: A very rare genetic disorder where a portion of the genetic material on the long arm (q) of chromosome 9 is duplicated which results in various abnormalities. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the size and location of the genetic material involved.
  • Chromosome 9q duplication syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder involving duplication of the long arm (q) of chromosome 9 resulting in various abnormalities.
  • Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia: A rare form of leukemia characterized by excessive levels of mature neutrophils.
  • Chronic Pain Syndromes: Any of a variety of disorders that can cause chronic pain of different types.
  • Chronic acne-like behind-knee skin symptoms: reddish raised elevated patches on the skin behind the knee
  • Chronic acne-like elbow skin symptoms: reddish raised elevated lesions on the elbow
  • Chronic acne-like knee skin symptoms: acne is a disorder of the pilosebaceous unit. The inflammatory process varies from a papule, pustule to a nodule
  • Chronic constrictive pericarditis:
  • Chronic elbow pain: conditions of the elbow which can cause pain for a long period of time
  • Chronic fatigue syndrome: A persistent debilitating fatigue of recent onset
  • Chronic gout:
  • Chronic ichthyosis-like behind-knee skin symptoms: rough and dry skin behind the knee
  • Chronic ichthyosis-like elbow skin symptoms: rough elbow skin
  • Chronic ichthyosis-like knee skin symptoms: rough skin on the knee
  • Chronic joint pain related to sports: pain in the the joints usually present for more than a period of 3 months and exacerbated due to sports.
  • Chronic knuckle pain: severe pain of the heads of the metacarpal bones
  • Chronic knuckle pain in both hands: Chronic knuckle pain in both hands is long-term discomfort or pain in the knuckles of both hands.
  • Chronic knuckle pain in one hand: Chronic knuckle pain in one hand refers to long-term discomfort or pain in a knuckle or knuckles of one hand.
  • Chronic necrotizing vasculitis: Inflammation and destruction of blood vessel walls which leads to death of associated tissue. Symptoms are determined by the extent and location of the blood vessel inflammation. The inflammation possibly has autoimmune origins. It can occur in condition such as rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus and scleroderma.
  • Chronic pain in both elbows: Chronic pain in both elbows is a condition in which there is long-term pain or discomfort in both elbows.
  • Chronic pain in multiple joints: it could be in the form of pain and swelling
  • Chronic psoriasis-like behind-knee rash: Psoriasis like plaques on the chest may be seen in a few cases such as
  • Chronic psoriasis-like elbow rash: Psoriasis like plaques on the elbow may be seen in a few cases such as
  • Chronic psoriasis-like knee rash: Psoriasis is a noncontagious skin disorder that most commonly appears as inflamed, edematous skin lesions covered with a silvery white scale. The most common type of psoriasis is plaque psoriasis. Psoriasis like plaques on the knee may be seen in a few cases such as
  • Chronic vitamin A toxicity: Chronic excessive ingestion of vitamin A can cause symptoms.
  • Ciguatera poisoning: Rare toxic food poisoning from eating contaminated fish
  • Clavicle stiff: A feeling of restricted mobility often caused by the overuse of a muscle and to be due to the build up of lactic acid.
  • Cleft lip -- palate -- abnormal thumbs -- microcephaly: A very rare syndrome characterized by a small head, thumb abnormalities and a cleft lip and palate.
  • Coccidioidomycosis: An infectious fungal disease caused by inhaling the spores of a particular bacteria. Also called desert fever, desert rheumatism, San Joaquin fever and valley fever.
  • Coconut crab poisoning: The coconut crab is commonly found and eaten as a delicacy in the Indo-Pacific region. These crabs can contain toxic chemicals which can cause severe poisoning in humans if eaten. The toxicity of these crabs is believed to be derived from the ingestion of certain toxic ocean plants. The best way to avoid poisoning is to not eat these crabs at all.
  • Cogwheel rigidity: Rigidity in which the muscles respond with cogwheel-like jerks to the use of force in bending the limb
  • Cohen Syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by reduced muscle tone, obesity and prominent front teeth.
  • Cold & Flu:
  • Cold-induced sweating syndrome 2: A rare disorder characterized mainly by the inability to sweat in hot weather and excessive sweating on exposure to cold weather.
  • Collagenous celiac disease: Collagenous celiac disease is used to describe progressive celiac disease characterized by the presence of a layer of collagen (scarring) in the intestinal layers. This form of celiac disease usually fails to respond to treatments such as gluten-free diets. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The condition usually fails to respond to treatment and has a poor prognosis.
  • Collins-Pope syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized by a dislocated hip, increased finger flexibility and facial anomalies.
  • Colorado tick encephalitis: A viral disease transmitted through the bite of ticks (Rocky Mountain wood tick and American dog tick) who are infected with the virus. Because the virus infects blood cells including erythrocytes, transmission can also occur through transfusion with infected blood but this is uncommon. Infection is most common in Canada and parts of western US. The incubation period usually lasts between 3 and 6 days but can be as long as a few weeks. The virus tends to cause to periods of fever each lasting for a few days.
  • Common Variable Immunodeficiency: An immunodeficiency disorder involving low blood gamma globulin levels which results in an increased susceptibility to infections. The condition may be inherited or can be caused by certain drugs (levamisole, hydantoin and carbamazepine).
  • Complement component 2 deficiency: A rare disorder where a deficiency of a compound called complement component 2 impairs the bodies ability to fight infection and autoimmune disorders.
  • Complex regional pain syndrome: Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a chronic pain condition that affects individuals following some form of trauma or injury to one or more of the limbs. It manifests as a non-stop,extremely intense pain most commonly affecting one of the arms, hands, legs or feet. Typical symptoms of CPRS include changes in the colour and temperature of the skin over the affected limb.
  • Congenital Muscular Dystrophy: Muscle weakness and wasting that starts at birth or around the time of birth. The severity and extent of muscle involvement is greatly variable.
  • Congenital SMA with arthrogryposis: Type of SMA (genetic motor neuron disease) appearing from birth
  • Congenital hepatic porphyria: A rare congenital disorder where there is an excess of porphyrin (pigments) in the body. The liver is responsible for making porpyrins.
  • Connective tissue disorders: Any condition affecting connective tissues.
  • Connective tissue dysplasia, Spellacy type: A very rare syndrome caused by an inherited collagen disorder and characterized by skin abnormalities, skeletal and eye anomalies and joint problems.
  • Conor's disease: An infectious disease that is caused by Rickettsia conorii which is transmitted by the brown dog tick (Rhipicephalus sanguineus). The disease occurs predominantly in Mediterranean areas such as India and Africa. The onset of symptoms is usually sudden and the incubation period is usually between 6 and 10 days.
  • Constant Arthralgia: Continuous arthralgia
  • Constant anterior knee pain: Constant anterior knee pain is discomfort in the anterior or front area of the knee that is steady and continual.
  • Constant behind-knee pain: Constant behind-knee pain is steady, continual discomfort in the back of the knee.
  • Constant elbow pain: Constant elbow pain refers to pain or discomfort in the elbow that is steady or continual.
  • Constant knee pain: Constant knee pain refers to discomfort in the knee that is steady and continual.
  • Constant knee pain in children: Constant knee pain in children is discomfort in the knee of a child that is steady and continual.
  • Constant knuckle pain: Constant knuckle pain is discomfort in the knuckles or knuckle that is steady and continual.
  • Constant lateral knee pain: Constant lateral knee pain in discomfort in the outer or lateral area of the knee that is steady and continual.
  • Constant medial knee pain: Constant medial knee pain is steady discomfort in the inner or medial area of the knee.
  • Constant posterior knee pain: Constant posterior knee pain is steady discomfort in the back area of the knee.
  • Constant wrist pain: Constant wrist pain is steady discomfort in the wrist.
  • Contractures -- ectodermal dysplasia -- cleft lip palate: A very rare syndrome characterized by impaired joint mobility at birth, skin problems, cleft lip or palate and growth and psychomotor retardation.
  • Contractures hyperkeratosis lethal: A rare fatal congenital syndrome where numerous abnormalities arise from reduced fetal movement due to excessively tight skin.
  • Cor pulmonale: Right ventricular enlargement and failure caused by pulmonary hypertension.
  • Cranio osteoarthropathy: A very rare syndrome characterized by large fontanelles, joint problems and finger clubbing.
  • Craniofaciocardioskeletal syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized by facial, skull, heart and skeletal abnormalities.
  • Craniosynostosis cleft lip palate arthrogryposis: A rare condition characterized mainly by the association of premature fusion of skull bones (craniosynostosis), cleft lip and/or palate and arthrogryposis.
  • Creatine deficiency, X-linked: A rare inherited disorder characterized mainly by mental retardation, seizures, short stature and facial anomalies. The disorder is caused by the absence of a compound needed to transport creatine and thus creatine levels may be normal or high, but the body is unable to utilize it.
  • Crepitus: A grinding sound made by the movement of 2 rough surfaces of bone over one another.
  • Crohn's disease: Crohn's disease causes inflammation of the digestive system. It is one of a group of diseases called inflammatory bowel disease. The disease can affect any area from the mouth to the anus. It often affects the lower part of the small intestine called the ileum.
  • Crunching sound: crunching sound on movement
  • Cryoglobulinemia: These are immune cells that precipitate in the cold and redissolve on warming.
  • Cryptococcosis: A fungal infection caused by Cryptococcus neoformans which primarily affects the central nervous system and the lungs. People with weakened immune systems such as AIDS sufferers are generally more susceptible to this type of infection.
  • Crystal deposit disease: A group of diseases characterized by the deposit of crystals in body tissues. Some examples of such disorders includes scleroderma, dermatomyositis, arthritis and kidney disease. The severity and type of symptoms depend on the nature and location of the crystals deposited.
  • Cuboid syndrome in athletes: Cuboid syndrome is a condition that results from injury to the joints and ligaments in the vicinity of the cuboid bone, one of seven tarsal bones of the human foot.
  • Cutaneous necrotizing vasculitis: Inflammation and damage of the blood vessel walls that also affects the skin. The condition may occur on its own or as a result of an underlying condition.
  • Cutis Laxa with Bone Dystrophy: A recessively inherited condition characterized mainly by loose wrinkly skin and growth and developmental delay.
  • Cutis Laxa with Growth and Developmental Delay: A recessively inherited condition characterized mainly by loose wrinkly skin and growth and developmental delay.
  • Cutis Laxa with or without Congenital Disorder of Glycosylation: A recessively inherited condition characterized mainly by loose wrinkly skin and growth and developmental delay.
  • Cutis Laxa, Autosomal Recessive, Type IIA: A recessively inherited condition characterized mainly by loose wrinkly skin and growth and developmental delay.
  • Cutis Laxa, Autosomal Recessive, Type IIB: A recessively inherited condition characterized mainly by loose wrinkly skin and a prematurely aged appearance. Many of the reported cases involved parents who were related.
  • Cutis Laxa, Debre Type: A recessively inherited condition characterized mainly by loose wrinkly skin and growth and developmental delay.
  • Cutis laxa, recessive type 2: A very rare syndrome characterized primarily by loose skin and delayed development.
  • Cutis verticis gyrata mental deficiency: A rare inherited disorder characterized by mental retardation, seizures and eye and movement problems.
  • Cyclic neutropenia: A rare blood disorder characterized by recurrent periods of extremely low blood levels of neutrophils which results in frequent infections. The low level usually occurs for about 7 days every 21 days. Levels of other blood components may also be affected.
  • Cystic lesions in the knee: Cystic lesions in the knee are sac-like areas of abnormal tissue in the knee that contain liquid or semisolid material.
  • Cytomegalovirus: A easily transmissible viral infection that is common but generally causes no symptoms except in infants and people with weakened immune systems.
  • Cytosine arabinose syndrome: Symptoms following the use of a chemotherapy drug called cytosine arabinose.
  • Daish-Hardman-Lamont syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by loose joints, tall stature and buildup of fluid inside the skull.
  • Dana syndrome: A rare inherited disorder characterized by the gradual degeneration of the white matter of the spinal cord and pernicious anemia. Various neurological symptoms can result.
  • Davenport-Donlan syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by deafness, white hair, contractures and papillomas.
  • De Hauwere Leroy Adriaenssens syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by widely spaced eyes, deafness and an abnormality of the iris of the eye.
  • De Lange 1: A rare disorder involving a variety of congenital abnormalities including retarded growth, behavioral problems, characteristic facial features and upper limb abnormalities.
  • Deal-Barratt-Dillon syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by scaly skin, jaundice, diarrhea and Fanconi syndrome (bone marrow fails to make sufficient new blood cells).
  • Decompression sickness: Condition from overly rapid decompression, especially when diving.
  • Decreased ankle and knee reflexes: deep tendon reflexes are tonic contraction of the muscles in response to a stretching force, due to stimulation of muscle proprioceptors. Also called myotatic reflex, these may decrease in certain conditions
  • Degenerative joint changes: is a disease process wherein the involved joint will progressively deteriorate over time
  • Del (2) (q37.3-qter) and dup (11) (q23.3-qter): A rare chromosomal disorder characterized by various anomalies. The listed symptoms are those observed in one reported case. The manifestations linked to most genetic defects are often variable to some degree.
  • Deletion 10pter: A very rare syndrome caused by a chromosomal defect (10p terminal deletion) and can result in a variety of malformations that are similar to DiGeorge syndrome and velocardiofacial syndrome.
  • Deletion 10q: A rare disorder caused by the deletion of a portion of chromosome 10q. The range and severity of symptoms is determined by the size of the portion that is deleted.
  • Deletion 6q: A rare chromosomal disorder where a part of the long arm (q) of chromosome 6 is deleted resulting in various abnormalities depending on the location and length of missing genetic material.
  • Delta-1-pyrroline 5-carboxylate synthetase deficiency: A rare syndrome caused by an enzyme deficiency (Delta-1-pyrroline 5-carboxylate synthetase).
  • Dendrolimiasis: A chronic illness caused by contact with certain poisonous caterpillar spines or urticating hairs.
  • Dengue fever: An acute viral disease characterized by fever, rash and myalgia and caused by a flavivirus which is transmitted by mosquitoes.
  • Dennis cohen syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by unusual facial appearance, mental retardation, short stature and sparse hair.
  • Depressive disorders: Depression or its various related conditions.
  • Depressive symptoms: Inappropriate depressed mood.
  • Dermato-cardio-skeletal syndrome Borrone type: A rare progressive syndrome characterized by skin, heart and skeletal abnormalities.
  • Dermatomyositis: A muscle disease characterized by chronic muscle inflammation resulting in progressive muscle weakness and a characteristic rash.
  • Dermatoosteolysis, Kirghizian type: A rare condition characterized by a variety of abnormalities including missing teeth, recurring skin ulceration, eye problems and nail symptoms.
  • Dermatostomatitis, Stevens Johnson type: A rare but serious condition involving inflammation and blistering of the skin and mucous membranes. It is believed to be an allergic reaction that can occur in response to some drugs or infectious diseases.
  • Desbuquois dysplasia: A rare condition characterized by short-limbed dwarfism, characteristic facial features and skeletal abnormalities.
  • Desbuquois dysplasia-like syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by various anomalies similar to Desbuquois syndrome but there is no mental retardation, hand abnormalities or facial anomalies involved.
  • Desbuquois syndrome: A rare condition characterized by short-limbed dwarfism, characteristic facial features and skeletal abnormalities.
  • Dialysis-related amyloidosis: Amyloidosis (protein deposits) from kidney dialysis treatment.
  • Diastrophic dysplasia: A rare genetic disorder characterized by short stature as well as skeletal, spine and ear abnormalities.
  • Dibasic aminoaciduria 2: A rare condition where protein intolerance occurs as a result of a defect in the transport of dibasic amino acids through the intestines and kidneys. The amino acids (component of protein) can't be broken down properly and used by the body so it builds up and causes damage.
  • Dieterich's disease: A rare disorder involving destruction of the head of the metacarpal bone due to an interrupted blood supply to the bone. The metacarpal bone is the hand bone that attaches to the finger bones. The disorder is often associated with trauma, steroid use or systemic lupus erythematosus.
  • Diffuse systemic sclerosi: A rare condition that characterized by skin tightness affecting the trunk and extremities as well as organ involvement. It involves an early period of internal inflammation which distinguishes it from other forms of scleroderma and the organ involvement can be severe and even life-threatening.
  • Digit stiff: Lacking the ease or comfort of joint movement in the fingers or toes.
  • Diphtheria: Infectious bacterial respiratory disease
  • Dislocated elbow: Dislocation of the elbow joint
  • Dislocation: Bone dislocated from a joint
  • Distal arthropathies:
  • Dorsiflexion of the wrist: flexion or bending toward the extensor aspect of a limb
  • Down Syndrome: A chromosome syndrome causing physical effects and mental retardation.
  • Down's syndrome associated Celiac Disease: Patients with Down's syndrome have a high degree of susceptibility to developing celiac disease. Up to 17% of Down's syndrome sufferers develop celiac disease but this rate varies amongst age groups and country of origin. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Down's syndrome-like hypotonia: Hypotonia is not a specific medical disorder, but a potential manifestation of many different diseases and disorders that affect motor nerve control by the brain or muscle strength.
  • Dracunculiasis: An infectious disease caused by the nematode Dracunculus medinensis which is usually transmitted by drinking water contaminated by infected crustaceans.
  • Dressler syndrome: A group of symptoms that can occur days, weeks or months after a heart attack or heart surgery. The symptoms may be due to such things as autoimmune processes, virus or bleeding around the heart which can result in inflammation of the membrane surrounding the heart.
  • Drug Allergies: Allergies to medications or other drugs.
  • Duplication 7q: A rare chromosomal disorder involving duplication of the long arm (q) of chromosome 7 which results in various abnormalities depending on the size and location of the portion of duplicated genetic material.
  • Duplication of leg mirror foot: A birth malformation characterized by the absence of the tibia and partial duplication of the foot. The partial duplication of the foot means that one foot can have as many as nine toes. Usually only one foot is affected.
  • Dwarfism -- stiff joint -- ocular abnormalities: A very rare form of dwarfism characterized by short stature as well as stiff joints and eye abnormalities.
  • Dyggve-Melchior-Clausen Syndrome: A rare genetic bone growth disorder characterized by short stature and other skeletal deformities.
  • Dysostosis: Defective bone formation.
  • Dysthymia: Chronic depression usually associated with elderly people suffering stress from a variety of causes.
  • EDS X: A very rare collagen disorder which is characterized by loose joints and hyperextensible skin as well as a blood platelet anomaly which causes bleeding into the skin (petechiae).
  • EDS10: A very rare collagen disorder which is characterized by loose joints and hyperextensible skin as well as a blood platelet anomaly which causes bleeding into the skin (petechiae).
  • Ear, patella, short stature syndrome: A very rare inherited disorder abnormalities of the inner and outer ear structures, missing kneecap and short stature as well as other physical and developmental abnormalities.
  • East African Trypanosomiasis: East African sleeping sickness from the tsetse fly
  • Eccentrochondrodysplasia: A rare inherited biochemical disorder characterized by the accumulation of mucopolysaccharides (glycosaminoglycans) in various body tissues due to insufficient amounts of certain enzymes needed to break it down.
  • Eclampsia: serious complication of pregnancy and is characterised by high blood pressure and convulsions
  • Ectodermal dysplasia -- arthrogryposis -- diabetes mellitus: A rare syndrome characterized by diabetes, short stature and tooth, hair and nail abnormalities.
  • Ectopia lentis, isolated: A rare syndrome characterized by dislocation of eye lenses which often occurred at birth.
  • Edema: The abnormal retention of fluid in a given anatomical area
  • Edinburgh malformation syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized mental and physical retardation, infant death and various other abnormalities.
  • Ehlers danlos syndrome: An inherited disorder of the connective tissue causing it to become weak and fragile. Connective tissue is found in skin, muscles, tendons and ligaments and hence all of these may be affected by weakness
  • Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, Dysfibronectinemic type: A very rare collagen disorder which is characterized by loose joints and hyperextensible skin as well as a blood platelet anomaly which causes bleeding into the skin (petechiae).
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome: An inherited disorder of the connective tissue causing it to become weak and fragile. Connective tissue is found in skin, muscles, tendons and ligaments and hence all of these may be affected by weakness
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome caused by tenascin-X deficiency: A rare genetic disorder which is similar to Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and involves a deficiency of tenascin-X which affects connective tissue. The main symptoms are loose joints, partially dislocated joints and fragile, hyperextensible skin.
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type 3: A rare genetic connective tissue disorder characterized by lax joints, hyperextensible skin and mild connective tissue fragility - a mild form of the condition.
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type III: A rare genetic connective tissue disorder characterized by lax joints, hyperextensible skin and mild connective tissue fragility - a mild form of the condition.
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type VI: A rare genetic connective tissue disorder characterized by lax joints, scoliosis and fragile sclera of the eye - Ehlers Danlos type with predominant ocular abnormalities.
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type VII: A rare genetic connective tissue disorder characterized by hypermobile joints, hyperextensible skin and joint dislocations.
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type X: A very rare collagen disorder which is characterized by loose joints and hyperextensible skin as well as a blood platelet anomaly which causes bleeding into the skin (petechiae).
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome with Platelet Dysfunction from Fibronectin Abnormality: A very rare collagen disorder which is characterized by loose joints and hyperextensible skin as well as a blood platelet anomaly which causes bleeding into the skin (petechiae).
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome with periventricular heterotopia: The association of a brain malformation (periventricular nodular heterotopia) with a connective tissue disorder called Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

Conditions listing medical symptoms: Joint symptoms:

The following list of conditions have 'Joint symptoms' or similar listed as a symptom in our database. This computer-generated list may be inaccurate or incomplete. Always seek prompt professional medical advice about the cause of any symptom.

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Conditions listing medical complications: Joint symptoms:

The following list of medical conditions have 'Joint symptoms' or similar listed as a medical complication in our database.

 

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