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Symptoms » Lethargy » Glossary
 

Glossary for Lethargy

Medical terms related to Lethargy or mentioned in this section include:

  • 2-Hydroxyglutaricaciduria: A rare metabolic disorder characterized by high levels of a certain chemical (2-Hydroxyglutaric) which causes a serious progressive neurological disease and damage to the brain. The features of this disorder are variable and some cases are milder than others.
  • 2-Methylbutyric Aciduria: A very rare genetic disorder where an enzyme deficiency prevents the break down of certain proteins into energy and results in a harmful accumulation of acids in the blood and body tissues. More specifically, there is a deficiency of an enzyme (2-methylbutyryl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase) needed to convert the amino acid isoleucine into energy. 2-methylbutyrylglycine levels build up in the body and may cause damage. Symptoms vary according to the degree of enzyme deficiency - can range from asymptomatic to life-threatening.
  • 2-methylbutyryl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase deficiency: A very rare genetic disorder where an enzyme deficiency prevents the break down of certain proteins into energy and results in a harmful accumulation of acids in the blood and body tissues. More specifically, there is a deficiency of an enzyme (2-methylbutyryl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase) needed to convert the amino acid isoleucine into energy. 2-methylbutyrylglycine levels build up in the body and may cause damage. Symptoms vary according to the degree of enzyme deficiency - can range from asymptomatic to life-threatening.
  • 3 alpha methylcrotonyl-Coa carboxylase 1 deficiency: A rare inherited disorder where lack of a certain enzyme (3-methylcrotonyl-Coa carboxylase) stops proteins with the amino acid leucine being metabolized normally by the body. The leucine builds up in the body and causes damage to the brain and nervous system. The severity of the condition is variable with some cases being mild enough to be asymptomatic. The condition differs from type 2 in that it originates as a defect in a different gene (MCC1 gene) but it causes the same enzyme deficiency.
  • 3 alpha methylcrotonyl-coa carboxylase 2 deficiency: A rare inherited disorder where lack of a certain enzyme (3-methylcrotonyl-Coa carboxylase) stops proteins with the amino acid leucine being metabolized normally by the body. The leucine builds up in the body and causes damage to the brain and nervous system. The severity of the condition is variable with some cases being mild enough to be asymptomatic. The condition differs from type 1 in that it originates as a defect in a different gene (MCC2 gene) but it causes the same enzyme deficiency.
  • 3-alpha-Hydroxyacyl-CoA Dehydrogenase Deficiency: A rare inherited form of biochemical disorder characterized by the deficiency of a particular enzyme (3-Hydroxyacyl-CoA Dehydrogenase). The enzyme deficiency only affects certain body tissues, in particular the skeletal muscles. The lack of enzyme activity prevents some fats being converted into energy. Symptoms tend to be exacerbated during fasting as during fasting, the body tries to rely more heavily on fats for energy. Fatty acids that are not completely metabolized due to the enzyme deficiency may build up in various organs and cause serious complications.
  • 3-alpha-hydroxyacyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase deficiency: A rare inherited form of biochemical disorder characterized by the deficiency of a particular enzyme (3-Hydroxyacyl-CoA Dehydrogenase). The enzyme deficiency only affects certain body tissues, in particular the skeletal muscles. The lack of enzyme activity prevents some fats being converted into energy. Symptoms tend to be exacerbated during fasting as during fasting, the body tries to rely more heavily on fats for energy. Fatty acids that are not completely metabolized due to the enzyme deficiency may build up in various organs and cause serious complications.
  • 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase deficiency: A rare inherited disorder where lack of a certain enzyme (3-methylcrotonyl-Coa carboxylase) stops proteins with the amino acid leucine being metabolized normally by the body. The leucine builds up in the body and causes damage to the brain and nervous system. The severity of the condition is variable with some cases being mild enough to be asymptomatic.
  • Abdominal symptoms: Symptoms affecting the abdomen or digestive tract
  • Abscess: This is an area of puss collected in a cavity which is constituted by necrotised tissue
  • Achalasia -- adrenal -- alacrima syndrome: A familial disorder characterized by adrenal gland-related hormonal problems, swallowing difficulty (achalasia) and a lack of tears (alacrima). Neurological impairment and motor and sensory neuropathy is progressive. The adrenal glands in patients are resistant to the ACTH hormone and hence fails to operate normally.
  • Acid-Base Imbalance: A disruption to the normal acid-base equilibrium in the body. There are four main groups of disorder involving an acid-base imbalance: respiratory acidosis or alkalosis and metabolic acidosis or alkalosis. Obviously the severity of symptoms is determined by the degree of imbalance.
  • Acidemia, methylmalonic: An inborn error of metabolism where amino acids in the body aren't metabolized properly resulting in high levels of the acid throughout the body.
  • Acidemia, propionic: An inherited genetic disorder where the body is incapable of processing some proteins and fats resulting in the accumulation of certain substances in the body which causes the symptoms of the condition. The condition can be life threatening.
  • Acquired Pure Red Cell Aplasia: An acquired condition which affects the formation of red blood cells and only red blood cells
  • Acquired hypothyroidism: Acquired hypothyroidism is a condition where the thyroid gland makes too little or no thyroid hormone. Acquired hypothyroidism can be caused by both thyroid disease (primary hypothyroidism) and hypothalamic-pituitary disease (central hypothyroidism)
  • Acquired idiopathic sideroblastic anaemia: A rare disorder where iron is transported into a developing blood cells but because it is unable to be used, it builds up within the cell and tends to stop it from developing into a fully functioning red blood cell. Thus anemia can occur despite adequate or even high iron levels. Acquired cases can occur on exposure to excess alcohol, lead and drugs or can occur to nutritional problems involving a deficiency of folic acid or copper or an excess of zinc. The condition can also be caused by conditions such as kidney problems, endocrine dysfunction, metabolic disorders, rheumatoid arthritis and leukemia.
  • Acromegaly: An abnormal enlargement of the limbs due to increased secretion of growth hormone after the cessation of puberty
  • Actinomycetales infection: A bacterial infection from the order of Actinobacteria. The range of symptoms is variable depending on which bacteria from the order is involved.
  • Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis: A type of encephalitis that usually follows an acute viral infection and involves an immune attack on myelin tissue which is part of the nervous system. Initial symptoms include fever, headache, vomiting and drowsiness followed by seizures, coma and paralysis. Often results in permanent neurological disorders.
  • Acute kidney failure: The sudden and acute loss of kidney function
  • Acute lethargy: Sudden onset of sluggishness and fatigue.
  • Acute meningitis: Acute meningitis is an inflammation of the brain that presents in an acute fashion. The inflammation may be the result of infective agents such as bacteria, viruses and fungi as well as non-infective agents such as certain drugs. Acute forms of meningitis can develop in within hours or days whereas chronic meningitis develops over weeks or months.
  • Acute myeloid leukemia: A form of rapidly progressing blood cancer resulting in the rapid proliferation of granulocytes and monocytes, red blood cells and platelets.
  • Acute non lymphoblastic leukemia: A form of rapidly progressing blood cancer resulting in the rapid proliferation of granulocytes and monocytes, red blood cells and platelets. It is one of the most common forms of leukemia in adults but can occur in children.
  • Acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, short chain, deficiency of: A rare disorder where the body lacks enzymes needed to convert some fats (short-chain fatty acids) into energy. Symptoms are exacerbated by fasting or acute illness. The severity of symptoms is variable with some patients remaining virtually asymptomatic their whole life while other suffer symptoms from infancy.
  • Acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, very long chain, deficiency of: A rare inherited genetic condition where the body is unable to convert certain fats to energy i.e. there is not enough of a certain enzyme which is needed to metabolize a type of fat called long-chain fatty acids. The build-up of these fatty acids in the body causes damage. There are three subtypes of the disorder each with varying severity: severe early-onset form, an intermediate form and an adult-onset form.
  • Adenocarcinoma of lung: A tumor that develops in the lining of the lung. The tumor is usually slow growing.
  • Adenocarcinoma, Bronchiolo-Alveolar: A form of lung cancer that develops in the bronchioles or alveoli.
  • Adrenal gland symptoms: Symptoms affecting the adrenal glands
  • Adrenal hyperplasia, congenital type 3: A group of disorders that occur when a deficiency of 21-hydroxylase impairs the normal process of making adrenal corticosteroids. The severity of the condition is variable depending on the degree of deficiency.
  • Adrenal insufficiency: A condition where the adrenal gland produces insufficient cortical hormones.
  • African Sleeping sickness: A disease caused by parasites (Trypanosome brucei gamiense or T. brucei rodesiense) and transmitted to humans by the tsetse fly which is found only in Africa. Causes symptoms such as fever, chills, headache, anemia, edema of hands and feet, enlarged lymph glands, lethargy, sleepiness, convulsions and coma. Also called African trypanosomiasis and sleeping sickness.
  • Albright's hereditary osteodystrophy: A rare genetic disorder where the body fails to recognize and respond to the parathyroid hormone. The parathyroid hormone is involved in controlling the blood levels of calcium and phosphate.
  • Alzheimer's disease: A progressive degenerative disease of the brain of unknown cause
  • Amotivational syndrome: An impaired desire to engage in normal social activities and situations due to external factors such as relationships, substance or events.
  • Anemia, Iron-Deficiency: A lack of fully functioning red blood cells due to a deficiency of iron. The iron allows the body to make hemoglobin in red blood cells which in turn allows the red blood cell to carry oxygen.
  • Anemia, Neonatal: Insufficient red blood cells that can carry oxygen around the body. It is common in premature births or can occur as a result of blood loss before, during or just after the birth.
  • Anemia, Refractory, with Excess of Blasts: A bone marrow disease which results in insufficient red blood cells in the blood (anemia). The prognosis is poor with death usually occurring within a couple of years. There are two types: type 1 refers to cases where the level of blasts is less than 10% and type 2 refers to cases where the level of blasts is 10-20%. When too many immature blood cells (blasts) are produced by the bone marrow, the condition may progress to acute myeloid leukemia - occurs in about a quarter of cases in type 1 and a third of cases in type 2.
  • Anemia, Refractory, with Excess of Blasts, type 1: A bone marrow disease which results in insufficient red blood cells in the blood (anemia). The prognosis is poor with death usually occurring within a couple of years. Type 1 refers to cases where the level of blasts is less than 10% and type 2 refers to cases where the level of blasts is 10-20%. When too many immature blood cells (blasts) are produced by the bone marrow, the condition may progress to acute myeloid leukemia - occurs in about a quarter of cases in type 1.
  • Anemia, Refractory, with Excess of Blasts, type 2: A bone marrow disease which results in insufficient red blood cells in the blood (anemia). The prognosis is poor with death usually occurring within a couple of years. Type 1 refers to cases where the level of blasts is less than 10% and type 2 refers to cases where the level of blasts is 10-20%. When too many immature blood cells (blasts) are produced by the bone marrow, the condition may progress to acute myeloid leukemia - occurs in about a third of cases in type 2.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are five different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases and individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry, 1: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are five different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases and individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms. Type 1 is caused by a defect on chromosome 7q11.2.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry, 10: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are five different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases and individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms. Type 10 is caused by a defect on chromosome 8q12.1.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry, 2: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are five different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases and individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms. Type 2 is caused by a defect on chromosome 19q13.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry, 3: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are five different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases and individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms. Type 3 is caused by a defect on chromosome 1p36.13-p34.3.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry, 4: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are five different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases and individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms. Type 4 is caused by a defect on chromosome 5p15.2-14.3.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry, 5: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are five different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases and individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms. Type 5 is caused by a defect on chromosome 2p13.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry, 6: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are now six different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases an individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms. Type 6 is caused by a defect on chromosome 9p21.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry, 7: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are five different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases and individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms. Type 7 is caused by a defect on chromosome 11q24-q25.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry, 8: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are five different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases and individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms. Type 8 is caused by a defect on chromosome 14q23.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry, 9: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are five different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases and individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms. Type 9 is caused by a defect on chromosome 2q33.1.
  • Aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage: Bleeding in the space around the brain that occurs from a leak in a weakened or dilated blood vessel under the arachnoid layer of the brain. Death can occur if treatment is not prompt.
  • Angiofollicular lymph hyperplasia: A rare disorder of the lymph system characterized by the development of benign tumors in lymph tissue anywhere in the body.
  • Antidiarrheal agent poisoning: Antidiarrheal agents contain chemicals such as atropine and diphenoxylate which can cause various symptoms if excessive quantities are taken. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Aplastic anemia: A blood disorder where the bone marrow produces insufficient new blood cells.
  • Apricot seed poisoning: Apricot seeds contain a chemical called amygdalin which breaks down into cyanide in the human body. The toxic chemicals are not released if the pit remains intact and therefore poisoning usually occurs if the seeds are crushed and eaten. Accidental ingestion is very unusual. Most parts of the apricot plant contain the toxic chemical with the highest concentration in young leaves. Different species of apricots have different levels of toxic chemical. Severe symptoms or even death can occur if children consume more than ten kernels or adults consume more than forty kernels. Theories exist that apricot kernels may help cancer sufferers but there has been no scientific studies that have proven this.
  • Argininosuccinase lyase deficiency, late onset: A rare inherited urea cycle disorder caused by lack of enzymes (argininosuccinase lyase) needed to turn ammonia into urea resulting in excess ammonia in the body. The late onset form of the condition tends to start later in life as there is some level of activity by the defective enzyme. The condition tends to be less severe and can be triggered by a change in diet, illness or some other stress on the body.
  • Argininosuccinase lyase deficiency, neonatal: A rare inherited urea cycle disorder caused by lack of enzymes (argininosuccinase lyase) needed to turn ammonia into urea resulting in excess ammonia in the body. The neonatal form of the condition can result in death or severe complications if not treated early enough.
  • Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome: A rare condition characterized by hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and kidney failure that has no obvious cause.
  • Autoimmune thyroid diseases: Autoimmune diseases of the thyroid gland.
  • Bacterial digestive infections: Bacterial infections affecting the gastrointestinal
  • Bacterial meningitis: Bacterial meningitis is a form of meningitis caused by bacteria that normally lives in the mouth and throat. When the immune system is unable to supress this bacteria, it travels to the cerebrospinal spinal fluid in the brain. From there it affects the membranes surrounding the brain.
  • Benign astrocytoma: Benign tumors that occur in the brain or spinal cord. Symptoms and severity depends on the location and size of the tumors.
  • Biotinidase deficiency: A metabolic disorder where the body lacks the enzyme biotinidase needed to process the vitamin called biotin (vitamin H) into carboxylase enzymes.
  • Biotinidase deficiency, late onset: A metabolic disorder where the body lacks the enzyme biotinidase needed to process the vitamin called biotin (vitamin H) into carboxylase enzymes. The severity of symptoms may vary depending on the degree of deficiency. Severe cases can result in metabolic acidosis which can lead to death if treatment isn't given.
  • Bipolar disorder: Cycles of mania and depression; commonly called "manic-depression".
  • Bird cherry seed poisoning: Wild cherry seeds contain a chemical called amygdalin which breaks down into cyanide in the human body. The toxic chemicals are not released if the seed remains intact and therefore poisoning usually occurs if the seeds are crushed and eaten. Accidental ingestion is very unusual.
  • Bitter almond seed poisoning: Bitter almond seeds contain a chemical called amygdalin which breaks down into cyanide in the human body. Accidental ingestion is very unusual. Bitter almond plants grow mainly in Northern America. Various processes can be used to leach the toxic chemical out of the bitter almonds.
  • Blastoma: A type of tumor that originates from precursor cells or blasts (immature or embryonic tissue). The symptoms can vary greatly and are determined by the part of the body that is affected. Blastomas can occur in parts of the body such as the brain, liver, kidneys, nervous system, bones and the retina.
  • Body symptoms: Symptoms affecting the entire body features.
  • Bone-Marrow failure syndromes: A disorder where the bone marrow fails to produce enough new blood cells.
  • Boron overuse: Consumption of high doses of the mineral boron can cause various symptoms.
  • Brain abscess: abscess in the brain may involve any of the lobes of the brain
  • Brain symptoms: Symptoms affecting the brain
  • Bronchiolitis: A condition which is characterized by inflammation of the bronchioles
  • California encephalitis: An uncommon mosquito born virus (California encephalitis virus) which can cause brain inflammation in humans. The severity of symptoms is variable. The incubation period can last from a few days to a week. Infants and children tend to be more severely affected than adults who sometimes have no obvious symptoms.
  • Canavan leukodystrophy: A rare inherited disorder where a chemical imbalance in the brain leads to spongy degeneration of the central nervous system which results in progressive mental deterioration and associated symptoms.
  • Carbamoyl-phosphate synthase 1 deficiency: A very rare inherited urea cycle disorder where the lack of the enzyme carbamoyl phosphate synthetase prevents ammonia from being turned into urea and being excreted in the urine. Excess ammonia builds up in the body which can cause serious complications or even death if left untreated.
  • Cerebral astrocytoma, adult: A very rare tumor that occurs in adults and develops in brain cells called astrocytes. The part of the brain involved is the cerebrum at the top of the head which controls functions such as reading, writing, thinking, learning, speech, emotion and voluntary movement.
  • Chagas disease: A parasitic infection caused by the protozoa Trypanosoma cruzi and transmitted by insect bites or blood transfusions. The disease primarily involves the heart and gastrointestinal system.
  • Chemical poisoning -- 1,1-Dichloroethene: 1,1-Dichloroethene is a chemical used in packaging, food wraps, carpet backing, adhesives and steel pipe coating. The main effects of an overdose of this chemical central nervous depression and central nervous system depression. However, some people can suffer an adverse reaction to the chemical. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- 1,1-Dimethylhydrazine: 1,1-Dimethylhydrazine is a chemical used mainly in jet fuel and rocket fuel, plant growth agent, photography and various other industrial uses. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- 2,4-Dichlorophenol: 2,4-Dichlorophenol is a chemical used in the production of antiseptics, bactericides, disinfectants and fungicides. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- 2-Methyl-4-Chlorophenoxyacetic Acid: 2-Methyl-4-Chlorophenoxyacetic Acid is a chemical mainly used as a herbicide for field crops and turf. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- 4-Aminodiphenyl: 4-Aminodiphenyl is a chemical used mainly in research and laboratory facilities. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Acetylene: Acetylene is a chemical used mainly as a mixing gas for welding. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Acetylene Dichloride: Acetylene Dichloride is a chemical used mainly in the production of perfumes, dyes and thermoplastics. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Acetylsalicylic Acid: Acetylsalicylic Acid is also known as aspirin and is primarily used to relieve pain, fever and inflammation. Excessive exposure to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Benomyl: Benomyl is a chemical used mainly as a fungicide for fruit, vegetables and ornamental plants. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Benzene: Benzene is a chemical used mainly in gasoline fuel and as an industrial solvent. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Ethyl Methacrylate: Ethyl Methacrylate is a chemical used mainly in . Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Glaze: Glazes are used to put a shiny finish on various surfaces such as pottery. Glazes contain chemicals such as lead and zinc oxide which can cause serious symptoms if sufficient quantities are eaten. The chemicals cause damage to the gastrointestinal lining and the damage may continue for weeks after the poison was ingested. Death can result in severe cases. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Glufosinate: Glufosinate is a chemical used mainly in herbicides. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Isopropyl Alcohol: Isopropyl Alcohol is a chemical used mainly as a rubbing alcohol and also in perfumes, paint thinners, disinfectants, cleaners and fuels. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Kratom: Kratom is a plant used to make a tea which produce similar effects to opium . Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Quintozene: Quintozene is a chemical used mainly as a soil fungicide and a seed dressing. The chemical is considered to be relatively nontoxic and unlikely to cause symptoms upon exposure. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Rotenone: Rotenone is a naturally occurring chemical found in certain plants (Derris and Lonchocarpus sp.). It gives the plant insecticidal and pesticidal properties and is hence utilized commercially as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. Inhalation tends to cause more severe symptoms than ingestion. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Cherry laurel seed poisoning: Wild cherry seeds contain a chemical called amygdalin which breaks down into cyanide in the human body. The toxic chemicals are not released if the seed remains intact and therefore poisoning usually occurs if the seeds are crushed and eaten. Accidental ingestion is very unusual. Wild cherry plants grow mainly in eastern Europe, Western Asia and Britain.
  • Cherry seed poisoning: Cherry seeds contain a chemical called amygdalin which breaks down into cyanide in the human body. The toxic chemicals are not released if the seed remains intact and therefore poisoning usually only occurs if the seeds are crushed and eaten. Accidental ingestion is very unusual.
  • Chokecherry seed poisoning: Chokecherry seeds contain a chemical called amygdalin which breaks down into cyanide in the human body. The toxic chemicals are not released if the seed remains intact and therefore poisoning usually occurs if the seeds are crushed and eaten. Accidental ingestion is very unusual. Chokecherry plants grow mainly in Northern America.
  • Choroid Plexus neoplasms: A rare type of brain tumor that originates in the choroids plexus. The choroids plexus is located inside a space in the brain called the ventricles and produces cerebrospinal fluid. Symptoms are determined by the size, type and exact location of the tumor.
  • Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: A persistent debilitating fatigue of recent onset
  • Chronic depression: Chronic depression is a mental disorder characterized by an all-encompassing low mood accompanied by low self-esteem, and loss of interest or pleasure in normally enjoyable activities and this maybe present for months together.
  • Chronic fatigue syndrome: A persistent debilitating fatigue of recent onset
  • Chronic kidney failure: Gradual failure of the kidneys over a period of time
  • Cirrhosis of liver: diffuse hepatic process characterized by fibrosis and the conversion of normal liver architecture into structurally abnormal nodules
  • Citrullinemia I, later-onset: A very rare urea cycle disorder where a lack of the enzyme argininosuccinate synthetase prevents ammonia being turned into urea which can then be excreted in the urine. The build up of ammonia in the body can cause harmful effects. The later-onset form of citrullinemia type I is generally milder than the neonatal form and may sometimes be mild enough to produce no symptoms.
  • Cocaine abuse: Stimulant drug with various effects
  • Cocaine addiction: An uncontrollable desire to use cocaine on a regular basis. Chronic cocaine use can lead to dependency in as little as two weeks. Frequent use leads to an increased tolerance to the drug so higher and higher doses are required to achieve the desired euphoric feeling.
  • Colorado tick fever: A tickborne condition caused by an arenavirus
  • Common symptoms: The most common symptoms
  • Congenital adrenal hyperplasia -- sodium-wasting form: A group of disorder that occur when a deficiency of 21-hydroxylase impairs the normal process of making adrenal corticosteroids - a severe deficiency of 21-hydroxylase causing salt-wasting which is potentially fatal.
  • Congenital disorder of glycosylation type 1H: Congenital disorders of glycosylation is a group of very rare inherited metabolic disorder where defective carbohydrate compounds are attached to glycoproteins and thus impairing glycoprotein function. Type Ih is caused by a defect on chromosome 11pter-p15.5 and involves the gene for a particular enzyme (dolichyl-P-glucose:Glc-1-Man-9-GlcNAc-2-PP-dolichyl-alpha-3-glucosyltransferase).
  • Congenital herpes simplex: An infant born with a herpes simplex infection transmitted through the mother. The infection may be localized or involve various internal organs and even the central nervous system in which case death can occur.
  • Congenital tuberculosis: Fetal infection with tuberculosis
  • Congestive Heart Failure: A condition which is characterized by breathlessness due to oedema and congestion of the lungs
  • Congestive heart failure: A condition which is characterized by breathlessness due to oedema and congestion of the lungs
  • Constipation: Hardness of stool or difficulty or inability to pass feces.
  • Corticosterone Methyloxidase type I Deficiency: A very rare genetic disorder where deficiency of a particularly chemical (aldosterone synthase) results in a deficiency of aldosterone. The condition can be severe enough to cause infant death unless the patient is diagnosed and treated.
  • Crack addiction: An uncontrollable desire to use crack on a regular basis. Chronic crack use can lead to dependency in as little as two weeks. Crack is a form of cocaine - powdered cocaine is heated with ammonia or sodium bicarbonate to make rocks of crack. Frequent use leads to an increased tolerance to the drug so higher and higher doses are required to achieve the desired euphoric feeling.
  • Cree leukoencephalopathy: A rare form of brain demyelination which usually starts between 3 and 9 months of age and death occurs by 21 months.
  • Cretinism athyreotic: A rare form of congenital hypothyroidism that causes mental and physical growth retardation in infants or children. Prompt thyroid hormone therapy is essential in order to prevent progressive neurological and motor deterioration.
  • Defect in synthesis of adenosylcobalamin: A rare genetic disorder characterized by the impaired ability to make a chemical called adenosylcobalamin. Adenosylcobalamin is a derivative of vitamin B12. The defect results a biochemical abnormality which affects the body's normal biochemical functioning.
  • Dementia: Mental confusion and impaired thought.
  • Depression: Inappropriate depressed mood.
  • Depressive disorders: Depression or its various related conditions.
  • Depressive symptoms: Inappropriate depressed mood.
  • Developmental delay due to 2-methylbutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency: A very rare genetic disorder where an enzyme deficiency prevents the break down of certain proteins into energy and results in a harmful accumulation of acids in the blood and body tissues. More specifically, there is a deficiency of an enzyme (2-methylbutyryl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase) needed to convert the amino acid isoleucine into energy. 2-methylbutyrylglycine levels build up in the body and may cause damage. Symptoms vary according to the degree of enzyme deficiency - can range from asymptomatic to life-threatening.
  • Diabetes: Symptoms similar to those of diabetes
  • Diabetes Insipidus, Neurogenic: A disturbed water balance due to a deficiency of vasopressin (antidiuretic) hormone which causes excessive thirst and urination. Causes include autoimmune disease, malignancy, trauma, infection and blood vessel disease.
  • Dibasic aminoaciduria 2: A rare condition where protein intolerance occurs as a result of a defect in the transport of dibasic amino acids through the intestines and kidneys. The amino acids (component of protein) can't be broken down properly and used by the body so it builds up and causes damage.
  • Digestive symptoms: Any symptoms affecting the digestive tract.
  • Digestive tract cancer:
  • Discitis: A subacute infection of the vertebral discs that usually occurs in children.
  • Disulfiram toxicity: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Double Depression: Double depression occurs when someone with dysthymia experiences an episode of major depression.
  • Down's syndrome-like hypotonia: Hypotonia is not a specific medical disorder, but a potential manifestation of many different diseases and disorders that affect motor nerve control by the brain or muscle strength.
  • Drowsiness: Excessive tiredness or sleepiness
  • Dysthymia: Chronic depression usually associated with elderly people suffering stress from a variety of causes.
  • Dysthymia/seasonal depression disorder, PND:
  • Electrolyte abnormality: An imbalance in the level of any of a number of chemicals (electrolytes) in the blood stream e.g. chloride, sodium, magnesium, potassium, calcium, phosphate and bicarbonate. Symptoms can vary depending on which electrolyte is involved and the severity of the imbalance - severe cases can readily lead to death. An electrolyte abnormality can be caused by such things excessive loss of body fluid through vomiting or diarrhea, kidney conditions, malabsorption and various drugs such as diuretics and chemotherapy drugs.
  • Empyema:
  • Encephalitis: Infection of the brain (as a symptom)
  • Encephalophathy recurrent of childhood: A recurring form of brain disease that has been noted to occur within families. The condition appears to be inherited in an autosomal dominant manner in these families. Symptoms tend to have a recurring nature and can last for periods of days to weeks. The condition is believed to be an inherited predisposition with underlying immunological or metabolic problems which trigger the condition.
  • Endogenous depression: Endogenous depression is a mood disorder that affects some people from birth and is believed to be a genetic condition. A sufferer is prone to become depressed on the advent of traumatic events, exhaustion or when under high levels of stress and may not be aware of the disorder until confronted by symptoms of depression for the first time.
  • Energy symptoms: Symptoms related to levels of energy.
  • English Laurel poisoning: The English Laurel is an evergreen shrub with elongated spikes of flowers and white fruit with a black stone. The seeds, twigs and wilted leaves of the plant contain chemicals (cyanogenic glycoside, amygdalin) which are very poisonous and can cause death if eaten. The chemicals result in cyanide poisoning.
  • Enterocolitis: Serious type of intestinal infection
  • Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia Coli Infection: An Escherichia Coli infection that occurs in the bowel causing an enterohemorrhagic condition
  • Enterovirus antenatal infection: Fetal infection with enterovirus. The condition is extremely rare but infection around the time of birth often results in death or paralysis in survivors. The type and severity of symptoms is determined by the exact type of virus involved and at what stage of development the infection occurs.
  • Erythroblastopenia: A form of anemia involving the absence of red blood cell precursors which results in a low red blood cell count. The blood abnormality may be congenital or acquired through such things as particular viral infections or drug use. Without treatment, symptoms become progressively worse.
  • Esthesioneuroblastoma: A rare type of tumor that occurs in the upper nasal cavity. The tumor may obstruct one or both nostrils.
  • Familial Wilms tumor 2: A familial form malignant kidney tumor that occurs in children. Type 2 differs from other forms of Wilms tumor by the origin of the genetic defect (chromosome 19q13.4).
  • Fatigue: Excessive tiredness or weakness.
  • Fever: Raised body temperature usually with other symptoms.
  • Fire cherry poisoning: Fire cherry is a tree found mainly in the US. Ti bears round clusters of flowers and fruit with a large pit. The wilted leaves, stems and seeds contain cyanogenic glycoside and amygdalin which can be very poisonous if eaten. Severe cases of poisoning can result in death.
  • Fire-Bellied Toad poisoning: The Fire-Bellied toads are often kept as aquarium pets. These toads contain a poisonous chemical called bombesin and bominine which can various symptoms if accidentally ingested or comes into contact with the eyes, mouth or skin. Eye symptoms usually resolve within a day. The toads are native to Eastern Europe and Western Asia.
  • Flax poisoning: Flax is slender-stemmed herb which bears blue flowers and capsulated fruit containing smooth brown seeds. The plant originated in Europe but is found in many parts of the world growing wild. The plant contains a chemical called linomarin (a cyanogenic glycoside) which can cause symptoms if eaten in large quantities. Skin irritation can also result from skin exposure.
  • Floppy infant syndrome: A term used to describe reduced muscle tone and muscle weakness in infants.
  • Follicular dendritic cell tumor: A rare form of malignant tumor. Follicular dendritic cells are immune system cells found in lymph follicles. The tumor tends to be low grade and tends to reoccur after removal and occasionally metastasizes. The symptoms are determined by the location and size of the tumor. The tumor can occur on various parts of the body such as lymph nodes, tonsils, armpits and mediastinum but is most common in the neck lymph nodes.
  • Food Additive Adverse reaction -- chocolate: An intolerance to chocolate is an adverse reaction (not an immune response) by the body to chocolate. The adverse reaction results from the body's inability to metabolize the food. The amount of chocolate required to trigger the onset of symptoms and the nature and severity of symptoms may vary considerably between patients.
  • Food Additive Adverse reaction -- sulphite: An intolerance to sulphite is an adverse reaction (not an immune response) by the body to sulphite. The adverse reaction results from the body's inability to metabolize the substance. The amount of sulphite required to trigger the onset of symptoms and the nature and severity of symptoms may vary considerably between patients.
  • Foxglove poisoning: The foxglove is a herb which produces fruit in a capsule and colored, tubular flowers. The leaves, flowers and seeds of the plant contain a very toxic chemical called digitalis glycoside which can cause serious symptoms or even death if eaten. Skin irritation can occur if contact with the skin occurs. NOTE: Patients who are taking certain medications (digoxin, beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers) are more susceptible to foxglove poisoning.
  • Functioning pancreatic endocrine tumor: Tumors that develop in the pancreas and cause excessive secretion of one or more pancreatic hormones such as insulin, somatostatin, glucagons, gastrin, ACTH (corticosteroids) and vasoactive intestinal peptidase.
  • Galactosemia I: A rare inherited disorder where deficiency of a particular enzyme (galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase) prevents the metabolism of galactose which is a sugar component of milk. Ranges from milk intolerance in mild cases to death in severe untreated cases.
  • Gastritis: gastritis is inflammation of the gastric mucosa of the stomach
  • Gastrointestinal neoplasm: A growth or excessive proliferation of cells in the lining of the gastrointestinal tract which includes the esophagus, intestine, pharynx and stomach. The growth may be benign or malignant. The symptoms are determined by the size, location and stage of the tumor.
  • Gastrointestinal tumors: Any tumor of the gastrointestinal (digestive) system, including cancers and benign tumors.
  • Glenard syndrome: The downward displacement of internal organs.
  • Glycine synthase deficiency: A rare genetic disorder characterized by high blood glycine levels which is toxic to the body. The severity of the condition varies according to the degree of deficiency and age of onset. The classical neonatal form is generally quite severe, the atypical mild form which generally includes symptoms such as aggressiveness, behavioral problems and speech problems. The transient neonatal form involves high blood glycine levels at birth which then returns to normal within a couple of months - there was no neurological or developmental impairment.
  • Glycine synthase deficiency, type 1: A rare genetic disorder characterized by high blood glycine levels. It is caused by a defect in the P protein (pyridoxal phosphate-dependent glycine decarboxylase) in the energy creating center of cells (mitochondria).
  • Glycine synthase deficiency, type 2: A rare genetic disorder characterized by high blood glycine levels. It is caused by a defect in the T protein (tetrahydrofolate-requiring enzyme) in the energy creating center of cells (mitochondria).
  • Granulomatous hypophysitis: A rare disorder caused by the inflammation of the pituitary gland. It can occur as a result of other infections such as tuberculosis and sarcoidosis.
  • Grass spider poisoning: The grass spider is a type of funnel web spider native the western parts of the US.
  • HADH deficiency: A rare inherited form of biochemical disorder characterized by the deficiency of a particular enzyme (3-Hydroxyacyl-CoA Dehydrogenase). The enzyme deficiency only affects certain body tissues, in particular the skeletal muscles. The lack of enzyme activity prevents some fats being converted into energy. Symptoms tend to be exacerbated during fasting as during fasting, the body tries to rely more heavily on fats for energy. Fatty acids that are not completely metabolized due to the enzyme deficiency may build up in various organs and cause serious complications.
  • HMG-CoA lyase deficiency: A rare inherited metabolic disorder where deficiency of a particular enzyme impairs the processing of amino acids in food to create energy and causes various symptoms. Stresses on the body such as infection, fasting and heavy exercise can trigger an episode.
  • Head symptoms: Symptoms affecting the head or brain
  • Helicobacter cinaedi infection: Helicobacter cinaedi is a food borne bacterial infection which may cause mild to severe gastroenteritis.
  • Helicobacter fenneliae infection: Helicobacter fenneliae is a food borne bacterial infection which may cause mild to severe gastroenteritis.
  • Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome, Atypical, Susceptibility to, 1: Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome is a rare condition characterized by hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and kidney failure that has no obvious cause. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility to developing the condition. Type 1 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 8q34.3.
  • Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome, Atypical, Susceptibility to, 2: Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome is a rare condition characterized by hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and kidney failure that has no obvious cause. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility to developing the condition. Type 2 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 1q32.
  • Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome, Atypical, Susceptibility to, 3: Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome is a rare condition characterized by hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and kidney failure that has no obvious cause. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility to developing the condition. Type 3 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 4q25.
  • Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome, Atypical, Susceptibility to, 4: Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome is a rare condition characterized by hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and kidney failure that has no obvious cause. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility to developing the condition. Type 4 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 6p21.3.
  • Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome, Atypical, Susceptibility to, 5: Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome is a rare condition characterized by hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and kidney failure that has no obvious cause. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility to developing the condition. Type 5 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 19p13.3-p13.2.
  • Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome, Atypical, Susceptibility to, 6: Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome is a rare condition characterized by hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and kidney failure that has no obvious cause. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility to developing the condition. Type 6 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 20p11.2.
  • Hemolytic anemia: A condition which is characterized by anaemia due to the destruction of red blood cells
  • Hemosiderosis: A rare lung condition where bleeding into the lungs causes lung damage due to the accumulation of iron. The severity of the condition is determined by the amount of bleeding.
  • Hepatic amyloidosis with intrahepatic cholestasis: Amyloidosis is a rare group of metabolic disorders where a protein called amyloid accumulates in body organs and tissues where it can cause damage. In hepatic amyloidosis, the amyloid deposits occur primarily in the liver which affects the flow of bile through the organ and results in intrahepatic cholestasis.
  • Hepatic encephalopathy syndrome: A rare syndrome involving the association of advanced liver disease and neurological problems.
  • Hepatitis: Any inflammation of the liver
  • Hepatitis X (non-A,-B,-C,-D,-E): Viral liver inflammation that cannot be determined to be one of the existing types of viral hepatitis - A,B,C,D and E.
  • Hepatorenal tyrosinemia: A rare genetic metabolic disorder characterized by a deficiency of particular enzymes which prevents the breakdown of tyrosine which then builds up in the liver. Type 1 involves a deficiency of the enzyme fumaril acetoacetate hydrolase.
  • Herbal Agent adverse reaction -- Licorice: Licorice can be used as a herbal agent in cough medications and as a food additive in chewing gum and chewing tobacco. The herbal agent contains a chemical called glycyrrhizic acid which can cause an adverse reaction in some people.
  • Herbal Agent adverse reaction -- Margosa oil: Margosa oil can be used as a herbal agent to treat parasitic infestations. The herbal agent contains various chemicals which can cause an adverse reaction in some people.
  • Herbal Agent adverse reaction -- Passion Flower: Passion Flower can be used as a herbal agent to treat insomnia, nerve painand anxiety. The herbal agent contains various chemicals which can cause an adverse reaction in some people.
  • Herbal Agent overdose -- Melaleuca Oil: Melaleuca Oil can be used as a herbal agent to treat fungal infections, prevent bacterial infections and to assist in the healing of skin burns. The herbal agent contains a variety of chemicals (plant terpenes, cineole, pinene) which can cause various symptoms if excessive quantities are taken.
  • Herbal Agent overdose -- Peppermint Oil: Peppermint Oil can be used as an antispasmodic (to treat nausea, dyspepsia and irritable bowel syndrome) and as an antibacterial. The herbal agent contains various chemicals (menthol, menthone, methyl acetate) which can cause symptoms if excessive quantities are taken.
  • Herbal Agent overdose -- Valerian: Valerian can be used as a herbal agent to improve sleep and to treat anxiety, headaches, panic attacks and abdominal cramps. The herbal agent contains chemicals which can cause various symptoms if excessive quantities are taken.
  • Hereditary Hemochromatosis: A genetic disorder where too much iron is absorbed from food and it is stored in various parts of the body which can cause damage. There are 4 types of hemochromatosis and they are distinguished by age of onset, genetic cause and type of inheritance. Some sufferers may be asymptomatic.
  • Hereditary spherocytic hemolytic anemia: An inherited blood disorder where a metabolic defect causes defects in the red blood cells membranes which leads to their characteristic spherical shape (normal cells are doughnut shaped) and premature destruction.
  • Herpes, Neonatal: Neonatal herpes is the infection of a newborn with the herpes virus within the first six weeks of life. The virus may be transmitted from the mother to the baby while it is still in the uterus or during delivery. The risk of transmitting the virus is highest if genital herpes is contracted during the late stages of the pregnancy. A mother with long standing or recurring herpes infection usually has sufficient antibodies to the virus to prevent the infant becoming infected. Neonatal herpes can also be contracted when an infant comes into contact with an infected person e.g. being kissed by and adult with cold sores. A cesarean birth may be advised for mothers who have active genital lesions.
  • Hobo spider poisoning: The Hobo spider is a type of funnel web spider which can deliver a painful bite. Their bite can cause localized tissue necrosis which can take a long time to heal. Systemic symptoms may occur in severe cases but this is rare.
  • Holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency: An inherited disorder where the enzymes that use the vitamin biotin are defective.
  • Huntington's disease: Inherited disease causing progressive mental deterioration.
  • Hyacinth bean poisoning: Hyacinth bean is a vine which bears elongated spikes of purple, white or pink flowers. The plant originated in Africa and is often used as an ornamental plant. The seeds and seed pod contain cyanogenic glycoside which can cause poisoning if large quantities are eaten. The seeds can be eaten if they are boiled for a long period of time with frequent water changes.
  • Hydrocephalus: A condition which is characterized by marked dilatation of the cerebral ventricles
  • Hyperglycinemia: Increased blood levels of glycine. There are two types of hyperglycinemia (ketotic and nonketotic) with different symptoms.
  • Hypernatraemia: increased concentration of sodium in the blood
  • Hypernatremia: Increased blood sodium levels. Can be caused by excessive sodium levels but is more often a result of low water levels in the body.
  • Hyperornithinemia-hyperammonemia-homocitrullinuria syndrome: A very rare inherited metabolic disorder where ammonia builds up in the body due to a defect in the transport of ornithine which prevents ammonia being converted to urea and being excreted through the urine. The severity of the condition is variable.
  • Hyperparathyroidism: Increased secretion of parathyroid hormone from the parathyroid glands.
  • Hyperreninemic Hypoaldosteronism, Familial 2: A very rare genetic disorder where deficiency of a particularly chemical results in a deficiency of aldosterone. The condition can be severe enough to cause infant death unless the patient is diagnosed and treated.
  • Hypertension in children under one year: Hypertension in children under one year is a condition in which a child under the age of one year has an abnormal elevation in blood pressure.
  • Hypervitaminoses A and D: The excessive physiological effect of vitamin A or D cause by excessive intake of the vitamins
  • Hypoaldosteronism, familial: A very rare genetic disorder where deficiency of a particularly chemical (aldosterone synthase) results in a deficiency of aldosterone. The condition can be severe enough to cause infant death unless the patient is diagnosed and treated.
  • Hypopituitarism: A condition characterized by diminished hormonal section by the pituitary gland
  • Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome: A rare condition where an infant is born with an underdeveloped left side of the heart which prevents the heart from pumping oxygenated blood efficiently to various parts of the body.
  • Hypothyroidism: The decreased activity of the thyroid gland
  • Hypothyroidism due to iodide transport defect: Low thyroid hormone levels in infants due to abnormal iodide transport in the body caused by a genetic defect. The severity of the condition varies depending on the extent of the defect and the length of time taken to diagnose the condition. Symptoms tend to become worse, the longer the condition is undiagnosed.
  • Idiopathic alveolar hypoventilation syndrome: A rare condition characterized by a reduced breathing rate despite no respiratory system abnormalities. The cause of the condition is unknown.
  • Inborn amino acid metabolism disorder: A group of inherited disorders where the body is not able to metabolize amino acids consumed in the diet. Amino acids are a part of carbohydrates, fats and proteins and are metabolized in order to provide energy or to make other needed compounds. There are many steps involved in metabolism and the severity can be greatly variable depending on the exact nature of the disorder.
  • Inborn urea cycle disorder: A genetic disorder involving a deficiency of one of the enzymes needed in the urea cycle. The urea cycle is the process of removing ammonia from blood stream by converting it to urea and excreting it via urine. A build-up of ammonia in the blood is toxic to the body and can cause serious brain damage. The progressively severe symptoms usually become obvious within the first few weeks of birth. Nevertheless, mild or partial enzyme deficiencies may cause little or no symptoms or symptoms that don't start until later in life.
  • Insomnia: feeling of melancholy
  • Iron poisoning: Excessive ingestion of iron - often occurs when children ingest adult iron tablets.
  • Jatropha multifida poisoning: The Jatropha multifida is a decorative garden plant which bears a sweet fruit. It is found in Africa, Australia and America. The oil from the plant is used in parts of Africa to treat parasitic infestations and rheumatism. The seeds, fruit and sap contain a chemical called curcin which can cause symptoms if ingested. Eating even one seed can cause symptoms in children.
  • Jaundice: yellowish discoloration of the skin and mucous membrane
  • Juvenile idiopathic arthritis: A group of chronic inflammatory joint disorders that affects children. The condition generally involves periods of time where the condition is active followed by periods of abatement of symptoms. In some cases, the condition can be systemic and can cause symptoms such as fever and rash with organ involvement. There are three main types of juvenile idiopathic arthritis - oligoarticular, polyarticular and systemic (Still's disease).
  • Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia: A rare form of malignant bone marrow cancer that occurs in children and involves the proliferation of immature precursors of certain blood cells - myelocytes and monocytes. The proliferation is slower than in acute forms of the disease.
  • King Cobra poisoning: The King Cobra is a large venomous snake usually found in southeast Asia and India. Most bites from this snake results in envenomation due to the ferocity of their bite. The poison primarily affects the neuromuscular system but can also affect blood clotting.
  • Kwashiorkor: A malnutrition state that is produced by severe protein deficiency
  • L-3-alpha-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase, short chain, deficiency: A rare inherited form of biochemical disorder characterized by the deficiency of a particular enzyme (3-Hydroxyacyl-CoA Dehydrogenase). The enzyme deficiency only affects certain body tissues, in particular the skeletal muscles. The lack of enzyme activity prevents some fats being converted into energy. Symptoms tend to be exacerbated during fasting as during fasting, the body tries to rely more heavily on fats for energy. Fatty acids that are not completely metabolized due to the enzyme deficiency may build up in various organs and cause serious complications.
  • LADHSC deficiency: A rare inherited form of biochemical disorder characterized by the deficiency of a particular enzyme (3-Hydroxyacyl-CoA Dehydrogenase). The enzyme deficiency only affects certain body tissues, in particular the skeletal muscles. The lack of enzyme activity prevents some fats being converted into energy. Symptoms tend to be exacerbated during fasting as during fasting, the body tries to rely more heavily on fats for energy. Fatty acids that are not completely metabolized due to the enzyme deficiency may build up in various organs and cause serious complications.
  • Lactic acidosis: A condition which is characterized by the occurance of a metabolic acidosis due to the accumulation of lactic acid
  • Lactic acidosis congenital infantile: A rare congenital condition where an infant has high levels of lactic acid in the blood causing metabolic acidosis.
  • Lassa fever: Infectious rat-borne West African disease.
  • Lemierre's syndrome: A very rare condition where a throat infection leads to secondary infection and blood clot formation in the internal jugular vein. The infected blood clot can then travel to other parts of the body and cause problems. The usual bacterial culprit is Fusobacterium necrophorum.
  • Lethargy in pregnancy: Lethargy in pregnancy is tiredness or a general lack of energy.
  • Leucinosis: A term used to describe high levels of leucine in the body. It is associated with a metabolic disorder called maple syrup urine disease where there is a deficiency of an enzyme needed to break down leucine so it builds up within the body.
  • Lipoamide dehydrogenase deficiency: A very rare enzyme deficiency (dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase) which can cause lactic acidosis. The age of onset and symptoms are variable.
  • Listeriosis meningoencephalitis: Listeria monocytogenes infection of the brain and meninges that can occur in immunocompromised people or newborns.
  • Listlessness: Feeling ill-at-ease
  • Lithium toxicity: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Long-Chain Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase Deficiency: A condition which is characterized by a deficiency in long chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase
  • Long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase deficiency: A rare inherited genetic condition where the body is unable to convert certain fats to energy i.e. there is not enough of a certain enzyme (3-hydroxyacyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase) which is needed to metabolize a type of fat called long-chain fatty acids. The build-up of these fatty acids in the body causes damage.
  • Loquat poisoning: Loquat is a shrubby plant which bears clusters of small white flowers and largish yellow fleshy fruit. The plant is often used in gardens as an ornamental plant. The kernel from inside the seeds contains a chemical called cyanogenic glycoside which can be poisonous if eaten in large quantities. The fruit from the plant is actually safe to eat but the seeds should be avoided.
  • Lyssavirus: A group of viruses that infect mammals and arthropods
  • M/SCHAD deficiency: A rare inherited form of biochemical disorder characterized by the deficiency of a particular enzyme (3-Hydroxyacyl-CoA Dehydrogenase). The enzyme deficiency only affects certain body tissues, in particular the skeletal muscles. The lack of enzyme activity prevents some fats being converted into energy. Symptoms tend to be exacerbated during fasting as during fasting, the body tries to rely more heavily on fats for energy. Fatty acids that are not completely metabolized due to the enzyme deficiency may build up in various organs and cause serious complications.
  • Malabsorption: Dysfunctional absorption
  • Malaise: General feelings of discomfort or being ill-at-ease.
  • Malignant germ cell tumor: Malignant tumors that are made up of germ cells which are immature cells that eventually become reproductive system tissues in males and females. The symptoms depend on the location of the tumor which may occur in the ovaries, testes or anywhere along the body's midline such as the chest, head, abdomen, pelvis and lower back.
  • Maple syrup urine disease: An inherited metabolic disorder involving amino acid metabolism and characterized by a sweet smelling urine, similar to maple syrup.
  • Maple syrup urine disease, type 1A: A very rare inherited metabolic disorder involving abnormal metabolism of branched chain amino acids (leucine, isoleucine and valine) and resulting in severe illness which generally leads to death if not treated. Even mild form can result in mental and physical retardation if untreated. Various types of maple syrup urine disease involve different genetic defects - type 1A specifically involves a defect in the E1-alpha subunit gene.
  • Maple syrup urine disease, type 1B: A very rare inherited metabolic disorder involving abnormal metabolism of branched chain amino acids (leucine, isoleucine and valine) and resulting in severe illness which generally leads to death if not treated. Even mild form can result in mental and physical retardation if untreated. Various types of maple syrup urine disease involve different genetic defects - type 1B specifically involves a defect in the E1-beta subunit gene.
  • Maple syrup urine disease, type 2:
  • Maple syrup urine disease, type 3:
  • Maple syrup urine disease, type II: A very rare inherited metabolic disorder involving abnormal metabolism of branched chain amino acids (leucine, isoleucine and valine) and resulting in severe illness which generally leads to death if not treated. Even mild form can result in mental and physical retardation if untreated. Various types of maple syrup urine disease involve different genetic defects - type 2 specifically involves a defect in the E2 subunit gene.
  • Maple syrup urine disease, type III: A very rare inherited metabolic disorder involving abnormal metabolism of branched chain amino acids (leucine, isoleucine and valine) and resulting in severe illness which generally leads to death if not treated. Even mild form can result in mental and physical retardation if untreated. Various types of maple syrup urine disease involve different genetic defects - type 3 specifically involves a defect in the E3 subunit gene.
  • Marasmus: A form of malnutrition caused by a severe deficiency of both protein and calories
  • Marijuana amotivational syndrome: Symptoms resulting from chronic marijuana use. Some experts won't recognize the symptoms as a distinctive condition.
  • Marine turtle poisoning: Marine turtles are found and eaten in the rivers and coastal waters of Southeast Asia. It is believed that sometimes these turtles become poisonous when the eat toxic algae which occur at certain times of the year. Symptoms vary in nature and severity amongst patients - obviously the more that is eaten, the more severe the symptoms are.
  • Marine turtle poisoning -- Green Sea Turtle: Green Sea turtles are found and eaten in the rivers and coastal waters of Southeast Asia. It is believed that sometimes these turtles become poisonous when the eat toxic algae which occur at certain times of the year. Symptoms vary in nature and severity amongst patients - obviously the more that is eaten, the more severe the symptoms are.
  • Marine turtle poisoning -- Hawksbill Turtle: Hawksbill turtles are found and eaten in the rivers and coastal waters of Southeast Asia. It is believed that sometimes these turtles become poisonous when the eat toxic algae which occur at certain times of the year. Symptoms vary in nature and severity amongst patients - obviously the more that is eaten, the more severe the symptoms are.
  • Marine turtle poisoning -- Leatherback Turtle: Leatherback turtles are found and eaten in the rivers and coastal waters of Southeast Asia. It is believed that sometimes these turtles become poisonous when the eat toxic algae which occur at certain times of the year. Symptoms vary in nature and severity amongst patients - obviously the more that is eaten, the more severe the symptoms are.
  • Marine turtle poisoning -- Loggerhead Turtle: Loggerhead turtles are found and eaten in the rivers and coastal waters of Southeast Asia. It is believed that sometimes these turtles become poisonous when the eat toxic algae which occur at certain times of the year. Symptoms vary in nature and severity amongst patients - obviously the more that is eaten, the more severe the symptoms are.
  • Marine turtle poisoning -- Soft-shelled Turtle: Soft-shelled turtles are found and eaten in the rivers and coastal waters of Southeast Asia. It is believed that sometimes these turtles become poisonous when the eat toxic algae which occur at certain times of the year. Symptoms vary in nature and severity amongst patients - obviously the more that is eaten, the more severe the symptoms are.
  • Medium and long chan 3-hydroxyacyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase deficiency: A metabolic disorder characterized by the deficiency of an enzyme (3-hydroxyacyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase) which is needed to metabolise long and medum-chain fatty acids. The severity of symptoms may vary depending on the degree of the deficiency.
  • Medium and short chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency: A rare inherited form of biochemical disorder characterized by the deficiency of a particular enzyme (3-Hydroxyacyl-CoA Dehydrogenase). The enzyme deficiency only affects certain body tissues, in particular the skeletal muscles. The lack of enzyme activity prevents some fats being converted into energy. Symptoms tend to be exacerbated during fasting as during fasting, the body tries to rely more heavily on fats for energy. Fatty acids that are not completely metabolized due to the enzyme deficiency may build up in various organs and cause serious complications.
  • Medium-Chain Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase Deficiency: A rare disorder where the body lacks enzymes needed to convert some fats (medium-chain fatty acids) into energy and hence these fats build up in the body and cause damage.
  • Medulloblastoma: A type of brain tumor.
  • Melanoma: Melanoma is the most dangerous type of skin cancer. It is the leading cause of death from skin disease. It involves cells called melanocytes, which produce a skin pigment called melanin. Melanin is responsible for skin and hair color.
  • Meningitis: Infection of the membrane around the brain (as a symptom)
  • Meningococcal disease: Dangerous bacterial infection causing meningitis or bacteremia.
  • Menopause: End of female reproductive years
  • Metabolic encephalopathy: disorder of the brain due to a metabolic etiology
  • Metastatic nervous system cancer: CNS metastases are traditionally viewed as a late complication of systemic disease, for which few effective treatment options exist.
  • Methylmalonic acidemia:
  • Methylmalonic acidemia -- homocystinuria: A rare inborn error of metabolism which results in impaired vitamin B12 metabolism. There are a number of forms of this condition with variable severity.
  • Methylmalonic acidemia, Cobalamin B deficiency: An inherited organic acid disorder where an enzyme deficiency (Cobalamin B deficiency) impairs the body's ability to break down certain proteins (methionine, threonine, isoleucine and valine) consumed in the diet. This results in a buildup of glycine and methylmalonic acid which results in harmful affects.
  • Methylmalonic acidemia, Methylmalonyl CoA mutase deficiency: An inherited organic acid disorder where an enzyme (Methylmalonyl CoA mutase apoenzyme) deficiency impairs the body's ability to break down certain proteins (methionine, threonine, isoleucine and valine) consumed in the diet. This results in a buildup of glycine and methylmalonic acid which results in harmful affects.
  • Methylmalonic acidemia, cobalamin A deficiency: An inherited organic acid disorder where an enzyme deficiency (Cobalamin A deficiency) impairs the body's ability to break down certain proteins (methionine, threonine, isoleucine and valine) consumed in the diet. This results in a buildup of glycine and methylmalonic acid which results in harmful affects.
  • Methylmalonic acidemia, methylmalonyl CoA racemase deficiency: An inherited organic acid disorder where an enzyme (methylmalonyl CoA racemase) deficiency impairs the body's ability to break down certain proteins (methionine, threonine, isoleucine and valine) consumed in the diet. This results in a buildup of glycine and methylmalonic acid which results in harmful affects.
  • Methylmalonic acidemia, vitamin B12 responsive: A rare genetic disorder characterized by the impaired ability to make a chemical called adenosylcobalamin. Adenosylcobalamin is a derivative of vitamin B12. The defect results a biochemical abnormality which affects the body's normal biochemical functioning. The condition responds to the administration of vitamin B12.
  • Methylmalonicaciduria, vitamin B12 unresponsive, mut 0: A metabolic disorder whose severity is somewhat variable - most patients die within months of birth with survivors having neurological problems. The condition involves abnormal metabolism of vitamin B12 which doesn't respond to treatment using vitamin B12 administration. This disorder is more severe than the mut (-) form
  • Mitochondrial trifunctional protein deficiency: A rare genetic condition where the body is unable to convert certain fats to energy. More specifically, there is insufficient levels of a particular enzyme needed to metabolize a type of fat called long-chain fatty acids.
  • Mohave Rattle snake poisoning: The Mohave rattle snake is a poisonous snake found mainly in Mexico and south-western areas of the US. The type of venom in Mohave snakes varies amongst species. Those with Type A venom tend to affect the nervous system whereas those with Type B venom primarily affect the blood and tissues. Type A tends to be more toxic than type B. Children tend to suffer more severe symptoms due to their smaller body size.
  • Mononucleosis: Common infectious virus.
  • Mountain sickness: Symptoms caused by rapid ascent to a higher altitude as a result of a reduction in available oxygen. May occur in mountain climbers or those traveling in unpressurized planes. Symptoms may include dizziness, nausea, weakness, fatigue, insomnia, headache, irritability, breathlessness and euphoria. The elderly or those suffering from pulmonary or cardiac disorders may suffer pulmonary edema, cardiac arrest or prostration. Also called acute altitude sickness.
  • Movement symptoms: Changes to movement or motor abilities
  • Mucormycosis: An infectious disease caused by fungus from the order Mucorales which is normally found in the soil and in decaying plant matter. Transmission is usually through the inhalation of spores. It is generally harmless to healthy individuals but can cause infection in patients who are immunocompromised or who have a serious chronic illness such as uncontrolled diabetes. Symptoms and severity can vary considerable depending on the part of the body the infection occurs in - gastrointestinal tract, skin, lungs, central nervous system, eye orbit and the paranasal sinuses.
  • Multiple Sclerosis: Autoimmune attack on spinal nerves causing diverse and varying neural problems.
  • Multiple endocrine neoplasia: A group of conditions that is characterised by the hyperplasia and hyperfunction of two or more glands of the endocrine system
  • Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1: Rare inherited disease causing tumors in multiple glands
  • Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2: Rare inherited disease causing tumors in multiple glands
  • Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 3: Rare inherited disease causing tumors in multiple glands
  • Muscle symptoms: Symptoms affecting the muscles of the body
  • Muscle weakness: Weakness of the muscles or loss of tone
  • Musculoskeletal symptoms: Symptoms affecting muscles or bones of the skeleton.
  • Mycobacterial infections: Any infection that is caused by a mycobacterial organisms
  • Myxedema: The most severe form of hypothyroidism characterized by swelling of extremities and face.
  • N-acetyl glutamate synthetase deficiency: A rare inherited urea cycle disorder where a lack of a certain enzyme (N-acetyl glutamate synthetase) results in accumulation of ammonia in the blood as it can't be broken down and removed through the urine.
  • Narcotic addiction: An uncontrollable desire to use narcotics on a regular basis. The drug may be used as a therapeutic medication for various conditions but it's use is also frequently abused. Examples of narcotic drugs include heroin, morphine, Demerol and codeine. Frequent use leads to an increased tolerance to the drug so higher and higher doses are required to achieve the desired euphoric feeling.
  • Necrotizing enterocolitis: A rare disease that is tends to occur in premature infants and involves inflammation and destruction of gastrointestinal tissue. It usually occurs within weeks of birth - often after the start of milk feeding. The condition can be extremely serious and even fatal.
  • Neonatal bacterial meningitis: Bacterial meningitis that occurs in an infant under 3 months of age. Bacterial meningitis is a bacterial brain infection.
  • Nerve symptoms: Symptoms affecting the nerves
  • Neuroblastoma: neuroblastoma is a malignant (cancerous) tumor of infants and children that develops from nerve tissue
  • Neuroblastoma, Susceptibility to: Neuroblastoma is a malignant (cancerous) tumor of infants and children that develops from nerve tissue. Symptoms depend on the size and location of the tumor. Some people have particular genetic anomalies which makes them more susceptible to developing a neuroblstoma.
  • Neuroblastoma, Susceptibility to, 1: Neuroblastoma is a malignant (cancerous) tumor of infants and children that develops from nerve tissue. Symptoms depend on the size and location of the tumor. Some people have particular genetic anomalies which makes them more susceptible to developing a neuroblastoma. Type 1 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 1p36.
  • Neuroblastoma, Susceptibility to, 2: Neuroblastoma is a malignant (cancerous) tumor of infants and children that develops from nerve tissue. Symptoms depend on the size and location of the tumor. Some people have particular genetic anomalies which makes them more susceptible to developing a neuroblastoma. Type 2 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 4p12.
  • Neuroblastoma, Susceptibility to, 3: Neuroblastoma is a malignant (cancerous) tumor of infants and children that develops from nerve tissue. Symptoms depend on the size and location of the tumor. Some people have particular genetic anomalies which makes them more susceptible to developing a neuroblastoma. Type 3 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 2p23.
  • Neuroblastoma, Susceptibility to, 4: Neuroblastoma is a malignant (cancerous) tumor of infants and children that develops from nerve tissue. Symptoms depend on the size and location of the tumor. Some people have particular genetic anomalies which makes them more susceptible to developing a neuroblastoma. Type 4 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 6p.
  • Neuroblastoma, Susceptibility to, 5: Neuroblastoma is a malignant (cancerous) tumor of infants and children that develops from nerve tissue. Symptoms depend on the size and location of the tumor. Some people have particular genetic anomalies which makes them more susceptible to developing a neuroblastoma. Type 5 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 2q35.
  • Neuroblastoma, Susceptibility to, 6: Neuroblastoma is a malignant (cancerous) tumor of infants and children that develops from nerve tissue. Symptoms depend on the size and location of the tumor. Some people have particular genetic anomalies which makes them more susceptible to developing a neuroblastoma. Type 6 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 1q21.
  • Neuroectodermal tumor, primitive: A very rare type of tumor that occurs in children under the age of ten. It is very aggressive and has a poor prognosis with less than half of patients surviving. The tumor originates from primitive nerve cells in the brain (CNS PNET) or other parts of the body (peripheral PNET). CNS tumors can be further divided into infratentorial tumors (e.g. medulloblastoma) or supratentorial tumors. The tumors usually cause no symptoms in the early stages and the symptoms that do develop will vary depending on the exact location and size of the tumor.
  • Neuroectodermal tumors primitive: A type of brain tumor that consists of small round cells and is believed to originate from primitive nerve cells in the brain. Symptoms are determined by the exact location of the tumor.
  • Neurological symptoms: Any symptoms that are caused by neurological conditions
  • Neurosyphilis: Syphilis affecting the nervous system.
  • Nocardiosis: A rare infectious disease caused by the bacteria Nocardia asteroides which primarily affects the lung but may also involve the brain, soft tissues and other organs.
  • Non-diarrheal (D-) HUS syndrome: A rare condition characterized by hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and kidney failure that is not associated with diarrhea which means that it is not a result of bacterial gastroenteritis. This form of hemolytic uremic syndrome may be caused by kidney transplants, certain drugs (cyclosporine, tacrolimus, cytotoxic drugs), pregnancy, malignancy, HIV, non-diarrheal bacterial infections, immunological conditions or it may be inherited or in some cases there is no obvious cause (idiopathic).
  • Numbness of both elbows: Numbness of both elbows refers to the loss or reduction of sensation in the elbows.
  • Obstructive sleep apnea: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) syndrome is characterized by episodic upper airway obstruction that occurs during sleep.
  • Opsoclonus Myoclonus: Condition with involuntary muscle and eye movement.
  • Organic acidemia: High blood levels of organic acids which is caused by abnormal protein metabolism. Maple syrup urine disease and propionic academia are examples of organic acidemias. Deficiency of certain metabolic enzymes one of the main causes of organic academia.
  • Ornithine Transcarbamylase Deficiency: A rare metabolic disorder where a deficiency of the enzyme ornithine transcarbamylase means that nitrogen isn't removed from the body and builds up in the blood in the form of ammonia.
  • Ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) Deficiency: A rare metabolic disorder where a deficiency of the enzyme ornithine transcarbamylase means that nitrogen isn't removed from the body and builds up in the blood in the form of ammonia.
  • Pain: Any type of pain sensation symptoms.
  • Panic attack: A condition which is characterized by an acute episode of intense anxiety
  • Papillary renal cell carcinoma: A type of kidney tumor characterized by the development of finger-like projections in at least some of the tumor. It can be inherited in a familial pattern or occur sporadically.
  • Parathyroid hyperplasia: A condition which is characterized by hyperplasia of the thyroid gland
  • Peach seed poisoning: Peach seeds contain a chemical called amygdalin which breaks down into cyanide in the human body. The toxic chemicals are not released if the seed remains intact and therefore poisoning usually occurs if the seeds are crushed and eaten. Accidental ingestion is very unusual. Most parts of the peach plant contain the toxic chemical with the highest concentration in young leaves.
  • Perinatal hypophosphatasia: An inherited bone disorder due to an inborn error of metabolism characterized by a severe deficiency of alkaline phosphate which results in death before or within days of birth.
  • Peripheral neuroectodermal tumor: A type of tumor that consists of small round cells and occurs in bone or soft tissue in the extremities of the body such as the arms, legs, pelvis or chest wall. Symptoms are determined by the location of the tumor. The tumor may be malignant or benign.
  • Phenol sulfotransferase deficiency: A rare inherited disorder where the body is deficient in an enzyme (phenol sulfotransferase) which makes them unable to process phenols and other toxic substance in the body. A buildup of phenol in the body can cause physical and behavioral problems.
  • Phenothiazine antenatal infection: Maternal use of a drug called phenothiazine has not been proven to cause problems in offspring. Animal studies show there is a risk but no definitive studies have been done on humans. Phenothiazine is used to treat mental and emotional disorders such as schizophrenia. The biggest risks are likely to occur during the first trimester (malformations) and towards the end of the pregnancy (poor muscle tone, poor reflexes and jaundice).
  • Phosphoglucomutase deficiency: An enzyme (phosphoglucomutase) deficiency which causes metabolic problems.
  • Pick's Disease: Degenerative dementia condition.
  • Plant poisoning -- Amygdalin: Amygdalin is a chemical found naturally in various plants e.g. stone fruit kernels and raw almonds. Eating these parts of the plant that contain the chemical can cause symptoms of cyanide poisoning as the amygdalin is converted to cyanide by the digestive process. Obviously, the concentration of the chemical varies amongst species of plant and often, significant quantities are needed to produce symptoms. Nevertheless, severe poisoning can result in death. Amygdalin is believed by some to inhibit cancers but there has been no conclusive proof of this.
  • Plant poisoning -- Cyanogenic glycoside: Cyanogenic glycoside is a toxin found naturally in various plants e.g. cherries, plums, almonds, peaches, apricots, apples and cassava. The chemical is usually concentrated in the seeds, kernels or wilted leaves. Eating these parts of the plant that contain the chemical can cause symptoms of cyanide poisoning as the cyanogenic glycoside is converted to cyanide by the digestive process. Even chewing the leaves can result in conversion to cyanide due to the presence of digestive enzymes in the mouth. Obviously, the concentration of the chemical varies amongst species of plant and often, significant quantities are needed to produce symptoms. Nevertheless, severe poisoning can result in death.
  • Plant poisoning -- Lantadene: Lantadene is a toxin found naturally in a plant called lantana camara. The chemical is toxic to the liver and can cause various symptoms if ingested. The green fruit and leaves are the most toxic parts of the plant.
  • Plant poisoning -- Tetranortriterpene: Tetranortriterpene is a toxin that occurs naturally in some plants (e.g. Chinaberry tree). It functions as a natural insect repellant but is toxic to the human nervous system. Ingesting plant parts with this chemical can cause poisoning symptoms.
  • Plexosarcoma: A rare type of tumor that occurs in the gastrointestinal tract and retroperitoneum.
  • Postpartum depression: The occurrence of depression in a woman that occurs after the birth of a child
  • Poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis: A condition characterized by glomerulonephritis which occurs after a streptococcal infection
  • Premenstrual syndrome: A collection of symptoms that some women suffer that occurs directly before menstruation
  • Primary amebic meningoencephalitis: A relatively rare but serious infectious disease caused by Naegleria fowleri which is a type of free-living amoeba that can be found in warm fresh water and damp soil. The incubation period is from a few days to a week.
  • Propionic Acidemia: A condition which is characterized by the excess of propionic acid and glycine in the blood resulting in acidaemia
  • Prostration: Extreme exhaustion and fatigue.
  • Pure red cell aplasia: A rare blood cell disorder where there is a sudden decrease in the number of red blood cells (erythrocytes) produced by the bone marrow.
  • Rattle snake poisoning: The Rattle snake is a poisonous snake found mainly in America. They are distinguished by a characteristic rattle at the tip of their tail.
  • Renal cell carcinoma, papillary, familial: A type of kidney tumor inherited in a familial manner and characterized by the development of finger-like projections in at least some of the tumor.
  • Renal cell carcinoma, papillary, hereditary: A type of kidney tumor characterized by the development of finger-like projections in at least some of the tumor. The cancer can occur in a sporadic manner as well as a familial manner.
  • Renal cell carcinoma, papillary, sporadic: A type of kidney tumor characterized by the development of finger-like projections in at least some of the tumor. The cancer can occur in a sporadic manner as well as a familial manner.
  • Renal failure: A condition characterized by a failure of the kidney to excrete toxic metabolites from the body
  • Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections: A very contagious viral infection that causes respiratory diseases. It generally only causes common cold-like symptoms in adults but can be serious in young children, infants, the elderly and people with a weakened immune system.
  • Reye's syndrome: is a potentially fatal disease that causes numerous detrimental effects to many organs, especially the brain and liver
  • Rheumatoid arthritis: An autoimmune inflammatory condition which primarily affects the joints
  • Rheumatoid vasculitis: A rare disorder where sufferers of rheumatoid arthritis with joint inflammation develop inflammation of small and medium sized blood vessels. It tends to mostly affect the blood vessels in the skin. The symptoms are determined by which part of the body is affected.
  • Rhinocerebral mucormycosis: A rare opportunistic infection that tends to occur mainly in the brain and sinuses. The condition is usually fatal and generally only affects immunocompromised people such as patients with leukemia, lymphoma or those that have had organ transplants or chemotherapy. The infectious agent is saprophytic fungi.
  • Rhinocerebral zygomycosis: An infectious disease caused by fungus from the orders Mucorales and Entomophthorales which are normally found in the soil and in decaying plant matter. The infection differs from mucormycosis which only involves the order Mucorales. Transmission is usually through the inhalation of spores. It is generally harmless to healthy individuals but can cause infection in patients who are immunocompromised or who have a serious chronic illness such as uncontrolled diabetes. Symptoms and severity can vary considerable depending on the part of the body the infection occurs in - gastrointestinal tract, skin, lungs, central nervous system, eye orbit and the paranasal sinuses. Rhinocerebral zygomycosis involves infection of the paranasal sinuses and the central nervous system.
  • SBCAD deficiency: A very rare genetic disorder where an enzyme deficiency prevents the break down of certain proteins into energy and results in a harmful accumulation of acids in the blood and body tissues. More specifically, there is a deficiency of an enzyme (2-methylbutyryl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase) needed to convert the amino acid isoleucine into energy. 2-methylbutyrylglycine levels build up in the body and may cause damage. Symptoms vary according to the degree of enzyme deficiency - can range from asymptomatic to life-threatening.
  • SCHAD Deficiency -- formerly: A rare inherited form of biochemical disorder characterized by the deficiency of a particular enzyme (3-Hydroxyacyl-CoA Dehydrogenase). The enzyme deficiency only affects certain body tissues, in particular the skeletal muscles. The lack of enzyme activity prevents some fats being converted into energy. Symptoms tend to be exacerbated during fasting as during fasting, the body tries to rely more heavily on fats for energy. Fatty acids that are not completely metabolized due to the enzyme deficiency may build up in various organs and cause serious complications.
  • Sarcoidosis: Rare autoimmune disease usually affecting the lungs.
  • Schizophrenia: A psychiatric disorder characterized by hallucinations and delusional beliefs where a person is unable to distinguish between reality and imagination. The condition tends to have a chronic nature and can be severely debilitating if treatment isn't sought.
  • Selected Encephalitides: Selected conditions which cause inflammation of the brain
  • Sensations: Changes to sensations or the senses
  • Sensory symptoms: Symptoms affecting the sensory systems.
  • Shaken Baby Syndrome: A condition caused by violent shaking of a baby.
  • Shock: Physical and mental reaction to reduced circulation
  • Short Chain Acyl CoA Dehydrogenase Deficiency (SCAD): A rare disorder where the body lacks enzymes needed to convert some fats (short-chain fatty acids) into energy. Symptoms are exacerbated by fasting or acute illness. The severity of symptoms is variable with some patients remaining virtually asymptomatic their whole life while other suffer symptoms from infancy.
  • Short-Chain Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase Deficiency: A rare disorder where the body lacks enzymes needed to convert some fats (short-chain fatty acids) into energy.
  • Sick: Feeling ill or off color
  • Sick building syndrome: A condition that occurs in workers who work in buildings with poor hygiene conditions with respect to ventilation, humidity and dust.
  • Sleep apnea: A condition which is characterized by transient attacks of apnea that usually occur during ones sleep
  • Spleen conditions: Any condition that affects the spleen
  • Streptococcal Group B invasive disease: Infection with bacteria called Group B Streptococcus which can cause severe symptoms or even death. The bacteria occur in the stomach and the urogenital tract of females and are normally harmless and cause no symptoms. However, it can cause a range of diseases in newborns, the elderly and people with poor immune systems.
  • Stress: Emotional stress (sometimes refers to physical stress)
  • Summer affective disorder: Seasonal affective disorder is a mood disorder in which people who have normal mental health throughout most of the year experience depressive symptoms in the winter or, less frequently, in the summer, repeatedly, year after year.
  • Tapioca poisoning: Tapioca is a shrubby plant which bears inconspicuous flowers. The tubers contain chemicals (cyanogenic glycosides) which are turned into cyanide by the digestive process. Ingestion of the raw roots of this plant can result in death if sufficient quantities are eaten. The tubers are edible if they are boiled first. Toxicity varies within the species depending on growing conditions and other factors.
  • The Congenital Lactic Acidoses: A condition which is characterized by congenital lactic acidoses
  • The Methylmalonic Acidemias: A condition which is characterized by an excess of methylmalonic acid in the blood
  • Thyroid disease: Any medical condition which affects the thyroid
  • Tick paralysis: Paralysis from Australian tick bites
  • Tiredness: Feeling tired either physically or mentally
  • Toxic Shock Syndrome: Severe immune reaction causing shock
  • Toxic epidermal necrolysis: A skin condition causing widespread blisters to erupt over greater than 30% of the body.
  • Traumatic Brain Injury: Brain injury from trauma or accident.
  • Tricuspid atresia: A rare congenital malformation where the tricuspid valve is absent and hence the right atrium is not connected to the right ventricle
  • Tubatoxin poisoning: Tubatoxin is a naturally occurring chemical found in certain plants (Derris and Lonchocarpus sp.). It gives the plant insecticidal and pesticidal properties and is hence utilized commercially as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. Inhalation tends to cause more severe symptoms than ingestion. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Tyrosinemia: A rare genetic metabolic disorder characterized by a deficiency of particular enzymes which prevents the breakdown of tyrosine which then builds up in the liver.
  • Tyrosinemia Type I: A condition which is characterized by an increase in the concentration of tyrosine in the blood
  • Ultram withdrawal: Symptoms that occur when Ultram use is discontinued or reduced. Symptoms may vary depending on the level of dependence.
  • Urea Cycle Disorders: Any disorder that affects the urea cycle.
  • Uremic encephalopathy: occurs due to build up of toxins which are normally cleared by the kidneys
  • Usher Syndrome: A rare inherited disorder characterized by sensorineural deafness and progressive vision loss.
  • Vanishing white matter leukodystrophy: Degeneration of the brain white matter. The condition tends to progress relatively slowly but a sudden deterioration of symptoms can occur after a head trauma or an illness involving fever. Some degree of recovery can occur after the sudden deterioration but other cases can result in coma and death. Survival is possible into the third decade.
  • Venlafaxine toxicity: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Very Long Chain Acyl CoA Dehydrogenase Deficiency -- Early onset: Very Long Chain Acyl CoA Dehydrogenase Deficiency is a rare inherited genetic condition where the body is unable to convert certain fats to energy i.e. there is not enough of a certain enzyme which is needed to metabolize a type of fat called long-chain fatty acids. The build-up of these fatty acids in the body causes damage. There are three subtypes of the disorder each with varying severity: severe early-onset form, an intermediate form and an adult-onset form. The early-onset form is the most severe and can readily lead to death if undiagnosed.
  • Very-Long-Chain Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase Deficiency: A rare inherited genetic condition where the body is unable to convert certain fats to energy i.e. there is not enough of a certain enzyme which is needed to metabolize a type of fat called long-chain fatty acids. The build-up of these fatty acids in the body causes damage. There are three subtypes of the disorder each with varying severity: severe early-onset form, an intermediate form and an adult-onset form.
  • Vibrio: An organism of the genus Vibrio or other spiral motile organism
  • Vibrio vulnificus infection: The infection by the vibrio vulnificus bacteria
  • Viral digestive infections: Any virus that infects the gastrointestinal tract causing a medical condition
  • Viral diseases: Any disease that is caused by a virus
  • Visceral steatosis: An inherited condition characterized by the deposition of small papules composing of granulomas in organs of the body.
  • Volume depletion: Reduced fluid volume in the cells, including both water and salts, similar to but distinct from dehydration.
  • Weakness: Symptoms causing weakness of the body
  • West Nile fever: Mosquito-borne infectious virus.
  • West nile encephalitis: A virus that is of the Flavivirus genus that causes the condition West Nile encephalitis
  • Western equine encephalitis: An infectious disease caused by an arbovirus (Alphavirus - Togaviraidae) and transmitted by infected mosquitoes. The infection primarily attacks that central nervous system and severity can range from asymptomatic to severe complications and even death in rare cases.
  • Western/Eastern/California encephalitis: A mosquito born virus transmitted to humans and sometimes horses.
  • Wild Lima bean poisoning: Wild Lima beans are a legume similar to the common lima beans which are considered safe to eat. The wild lima contains much higher levels of a chemical called cyanogen than the common lima bean. The cyanogen can cause symptoms and if sufficient quantities are eaten, death can result. Some people are so sensitive to cyanogen that eating even the relatively safe common lima bean may result in symptoms though usually they are not severe. Cooking destroys the toxic chemical in lima beans. Raw lima bean sprouts should be avoided.
  • Wild cherry seed poisoning: Wild cherry seeds contain a chemical called amygdalin which breaks down into cyanide in the human body. The toxic chemicals are not released if the seed remains intact and therefore poisoning usually only occurs if the seeds are crushed and eaten. Accidental ingestion is very unusual.
  • Wilms tumor 2: A familial form malignant kidney tumor that occurs in children. Type 2 differs from other forms of Wilms tumor by the origin of the genetic defect (chromosome 11p15.5).
  • Wilms tumor 3: A dominantly inherited form malignant kidney tumor that occurs in children. Type 3 differs from other forms of Wilms tumor by the origin of the genetic defect (chromosome 16q).
  • Wilms tumor 4: A familial form malignant kidney tumor that occurs in children. Type 4 differs from other forms of Wilms tumor by the origin of the genetic defect (chromosome 17q12-q21).
  • Wilms tumor and radial bilateral aplasia: A condition that is characterised by bilateral aplasia of the kidneys and wilms tumor
  • Wilms tumour and radial bilateral aplasia: A conditions that is characterized by the absence of one of the two forearm bones (radius) as well as the development of a type of kidney tumor called Wilm's tumor.
  • Wilms' tumor: A malignant kidney tumor that occurs in children.
  • Winkelman Bethfe Pfeiffer syndrome: A syndrome that is characterised by sensorineural deafness and pituitary dwarfism
  • Worm conditions: Any condition that is caused by infestation of worms
  • Yellow nail syndrome: A rare nail condition characterized by thickened yellow nails as well as swelling of parts of the body due to lymphatic drainage problems resulting from blocked or damaged lymphatic system.
  • Zygomycosis: An infectious disease caused by fungus from the orders Mucorales and Entomophthorales which are normally found in the soil and in decaying plant matter. The infection differs from mucormycosis which only involves the order Mucorales. Transmission is usually through the inhalation of spores. It is generally harmless to healthy individuals but can cause infection in patients who are immunocompromised or who have a serious chronic illness such as uncontrolled diabetes. Symptoms and severity can vary considerable depending on the part of the body the infection occurs in - gastrointestinal tract, skin, lungs, central nervous system, eye orbit and the paranasal sinuses.

Conditions listing medical symptoms: Lethargy:

The following list of conditions have 'Lethargy' or similar listed as a symptom in our database. This computer-generated list may be inaccurate or incomplete. Always seek prompt professional medical advice about the cause of any symptom.

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Conditions listing medical complications: Lethargy:

The following list of medical conditions have 'Lethargy' or similar listed as a medical complication in our database.

 

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