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Symptoms » Loose stool » Glossary
 

Glossary for Loose stool

Medical terms related to Loose stool or mentioned in this section include:

  • Abdominal symptoms: Symptoms affecting the abdomen or digestive tract
  • Acrodermatitis Enteropathica: A rare, chronic condition that occurs in infants and involves autosomal zinc malabsorption. Signs include blisters on the skin and mucous membranes, alopecia, diarrhea and failure to thrive. The condition may be fatal if untreated.
  • Adenoviruses: Common viruses causing common cold and various other ailments.
  • Amebiasis: Intestinal inflammation caused by Entamoeba histolytica and often marked by symptoms such as frequent, loose bowel movements that contain blood and mucus. Also called intestinal amebic dysentery.
  • Amoebiasis: An infectious disease caused by a free-living amoebic parasite called Entamoeba histolytica. The organism infects the bowel and causes gastroenteritis. Infection occurs through ingesting contaminated food or water. It is more common in countries with poor sanitation. The incubation period may last from days to weeks before symptoms appear.
  • Ampicillin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Ampicillin during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Apomorphine -- Teratogenic Agent: Experimental studies on chickens indicate that the use of Apomorphine during pregnancy may cause various harmful effects on the fetus. The likelihood and severity of symptoms may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at. The effect on human fetuses has not been conclusively determined.
  • Autoimmune thyroid disease associated Celiac Disease: Patients with autoimmune thyroid disease are more susceptible to developing celiac disease than the average population. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Autonomic neuropathy: A condition which is characterized by a functional disturbance or pathological change in the autonomic nervous system
  • Balantidiasis: Intestinal infection with a parasitic protozoa (Balantidium coli) resulting in intestinal inflammation. It is usually transmitted through direct or indirect contact with pig fecal matter.
  • Bladder symptoms: Symptoms related to the bladder and urination.
  • Blastocystis hominis: Common parasitic condition often causing digestive symptoms.
  • Bowel incontinence: Loss of full control of the bowel
  • Bowel movements: Changes in type or frequency of bowel motions
  • Bowel problems: Symptoms affecting the bowel
  • Brainerd diarrhea: Diarrheal condition of unknown cause.
  • Byler Disease: A rare inherited conditions where bile is unable to drain from the liver where it builds up and causes progressive liver damage. The conditions has an early onset and usually leads to end-stage liver disease by the end of the second decade.
  • Campylobacter jejuni: Rod shaped bacteria causing diarrhea.
  • Casanthranol -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Casanthranol (a laxative) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Celiac Disease: Digestive intolerance to gluten in the diet.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Chlorophyll: Chlorophyll is a compound found in green plants. It can be bought as a supplement and excessive ingestion can cause gastrointestinal symptoms but this is considered quite rare. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chloroquine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Chloroquine (an antimalarial drug) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Cholestasis, progressive familial intrahepatic 2: A rare inherited condition where bile is unable to drain from the liver where it builds up and causes progressive liver damage. The condition has an early onset and usually leads to end-stage liver disease by the end of the second decade. The various types of this condition differ in the origin of the genetic defect (liver-specific ATP-binding cassette transporter on chromosome 2q24). Type 2 is also associated with an increased risk of liver cancer in the first few years of life.
  • Cholestasis, progressive familial intrahepatic 3: A rare inherited condition where bile is unable to drain from the liver where it builds up and causes progressive liver damage. The condition has an early onset and usually leads to end-stage liver disease by the end of the second decade. The various types of this condition differ in the origin of the genetic defect (liver-specific ATP-binding cassette transporter on chromosome 2q24). Type 2 is also associated with an increased risk of liver cancer in the first few years of life.
  • Chronic Pancreatitis: Chronic ongoing inflammation of the pancreas causing digestive complaints.
  • Ciprofloxacin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Ciprofloxacin (a fluoroquinolone antibiotic) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Clindamycin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Clindamycin (an antibiotic) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Colestyramine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Colestyramine (cholesterol-lowering drug) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Collagenous Colitis: A chronic disorder of the digestive system characterized by inflammation and thickening of the large intestine lining.
  • Collagenous celiac disease: Collagenous celiac disease is used to describe progressive celiac disease characterized by the presence of a layer of collagen (scarring) in the intestinal layers. This form of celiac disease usually fails to respond to treatments such as gluten-free diets. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The condition usually fails to respond to treatment and has a poor prognosis.
  • Colorectal cancer: Cancer of the colon (bowel) or rectum.
  • Congenital lactase deficiency: A congenital metabolic disorder where a deficiency of an enzyme called lactase impairs the body's ability to digest milk and other products that contain lactose. Symptoms tend to occur soon after consuming such products. The severity of symptoms depends on the degree of lactase deficiency.
  • Constipation: Hardness of stool or difficulty or inability to pass feces.
  • Crohn's disease: Crohn's disease causes inflammation of the digestive system. It is one of a group of diseases called inflammatory bowel disease. The disease can affect any area from the mouth to the anus. It often affects the lower part of the small intestine called the ileum.
  • Cryptosporiosis: Contagious parasitic digestive infection
  • Cyclosporiasis: A parasitic disease caused by Cyclospora cayetensis which is transmitted by ingestion of food or water contaminated by infected fecal matter. Some cases are asymptomatic while others can be quite severe and untreated cases can suffer relapses.
  • Cystic Fibrosis: Cystic fibrosis is a hereditary disease affecting the exocrine (mucus) glands of the lungs, liver, pancreas, and intestines, causing progressive disability due to multisystem failure.
  • Cytomegalovirus: A easily transmissible viral infection that is common but generally causes no symptoms except in infants and people with weakened immune systems.
  • Degos Disease: A rare disorder where lesions caused by blood vessel inflammation and blockage form on the skin and eventually in the internal organs, especially in the small intestine.
  • Developmental Lactase Deficiency: This form of lactase deficiency occurs in premature infants. Lactase enzyme activity usually develops late in pregnancy so a preterm infant will not yet have developed this enzyme function. The greater the degree of prematurity, the greater the reduction in lactase activity.
  • Diarrhea: Loose, soft, or watery stool.
  • Dientamoeba fragilis: Parasite usually causing digestive symptoms
  • Digestive symptoms: Any symptoms affecting the digestive tract.
  • Down's syndrome associated Celiac Disease: Patients with Down's syndrome have a high degree of susceptibility to developing celiac disease. Up to 17% of Down's syndrome sufferers develop celiac disease but this rate varies amongst age groups and country of origin. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • E-coli food poisoning: Type of bacterial food poisoning
  • Entamoeba histolytica: Parasitic digestive infection.
  • Ergotamine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Ergotamine during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Erythromycin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Erythromycin (an antibiotic) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Ethanol -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Ethanol during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Familial Lactase Deficiency: A congenital metabolic disorder where normal amounts of lactase are produced but the lactase is defective and unable to digest milk and other products that contain lactose. Symptoms tend to occur soon after consuming such products.
  • Flucytosine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Flucytosine (an antifungal drug) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Gangrene: Death (necrosis) of a portion of tissue or entire organ due to decreased perfusion with blood or infectious destruction of tissue.
  • Gastroenteritis: An infection of the bowel
  • Gentamicin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Gentamicin (an antibiotic) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Giardia: Contagious parasitic digestive infection
  • Glucagonoma: Rare cancer of the glucagon-producing pancreas cells.
  • Graft-versus-host disease: A disease characterised by an immune response as a result of a transplantation or transfusion resulting in a widespread systemic inflammatory response
  • Hirschsprung's disease: A rare condition where abnormalities in the bowel muscles prevent it from contracting normally and pushing the fecal matter through which results in obstruction and dilation of the bowel.
  • Hymenolepiasis: A rare parasitic disease caused by a tapeworm called Hymenolepis nana or Hymenlepis dimunita. Infestation occurs through fecal contamination or by accidentally consuming insects that have eaten the parasitic eggs.
  • Hyperthyroidism: The excessive activity of the thyroid gland
  • Incontinence symptoms: Symptoms related to incontinence.
  • Indomethacin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Indomethacin during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Infectious diarrhea: Infectious diarrhea is frequent, loose, watery bowel movements that are caused by an infection.
  • Intercourse symptoms: Symptoms related to the act of sexual intercourse.
  • Interferon Alpha -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Interferon Alpha during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Intestinal Pseudoobstruction in Adults: A condition characterized by the clinical presentation of obstruction of the intestines when there is no mechanical cause.
  • Intestinal pseudo-obstruction: A digestive disorder where the intestines are unable to contract normally and push food through the digestive system. This results in symptoms similar to an obstruction and hence the name pseudo-obstruction. The walls of the affected gastrointestinal tract becomes thin and the muscles that control its motion start to degenerate.
  • Irritable bowel syndrome: A chronic non inflammatory disease with a psychophysiologic basis
  • Isosporiasis: Infection with a type of protozoan parasite (Isoporo belli). Infections tend to occur in tropical countries and AIDS patients are the most susceptible. Healthy individuals tend to recover within weeks whereas the disease persists for months or years in immunocompromised patients and may ultimately result in death. Incubation period is about one week.
  • Kawasaki disease: A childhood illness that generally affects the skin, mouth and lymph nodes.
  • Kwashiorkor: A malnutrition state that is produced by severe protein deficiency
  • Lactose Intolerance: lactose intolerance is the inability to metabolize lactose, a sugar found in milk and other dairy products, because the required enzyme lactase is absent in the intestinal system or its availability is lowered
  • Laxative abuse: When a person uses laxatives to excess
  • Legionnaires' disease: A severe respiratory disease which is caused by the Legionella pneumophila bacteria. The condition can result in pneumonia and can be life-threatening.
  • Lithium -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Lithium during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Lower abdominal symptoms: Symptoms affecting the lower abdominal region.
  • Lymphocytic colitis: Inflammation of the colon which is only visible through a microscope.
  • Malabsorption syndrome: is an alteration in the ability of the intestine to absorb nutrients adequately into the bloodstream
  • Malakoplakia: A rare chronic inflammatory condition of the genitourinary system that tends to mostly affect people with weakened immune systems. Soft yellow lesions or nodules form on the gastrointestinal lining. It is believed to be the result of the bodies failed attempt to completely destroy invading organisms such as fungus and bacteria.
  • Mefenamic Acid -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Mefenamic Acid during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Mercury -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Mercury during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Metformin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Metformin during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Microsporidiasis:
  • Misoprostol -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Misoprostol during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Nalidixic Acid -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Nalidixic Acid during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Norfloxacin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Norfloxacin during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Nystatin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Nystatin during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Obstructive Jaundice: Condition where blockage of the flow of bile from the liver causes overspill of bile products into the blood and incomplete bile excretion from the body.
  • Oesophagostomiasis: A parasitic intestinal infection caused by a nematode called Oesophagostomum bifurcum. The parasite commonly infects monkeys, goats, cattle, sheep and pigs. The infection is relatively rare in humans but is most commonly found in northern Togo and Ghana. Transmission usually occurs through oral contact with contaminated soil.
  • PFIC: A rare inherited condition where bile is unable to drain from the liver where it builds up and causes progressive liver damage. End-stage liver disease usually occurs before adulthood. There are three different subtypes of the disorder, each with a different genetic origin of the defect.
  • Para-Amino Salicylic Acid -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Para-Amino Salicylic Acid during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Pellagra: Dietary deficiency of vitamin B3 (niacin)
  • Pernicious anemia: A megaloblastic anaemia due to malabsorption of the vitamin B12
  • Possible human carcinogenic exposure -- Phenolphthalein: Some evidence indicates that exposure to Phenolphthalein has a possible link to an increased risk of developing cancer in humans. The carcinogenicity of the substance may be influenced by the duration and level of exposure. Phenolphthalein is used primarily to make dyes and as an acid-base indicator
  • Protein-losing enteropathy:
  • Pseudomembranous Colitis: Diarrhoeal illness caused by the bacteria Clostridium difficile, usually following a recent course of antibiotics and disruption of normal bowel bacteria
  • Psychiatric disorders associated Celiac Disease: Patients with Psychiatric disorders are more susceptible to developing celiac disease than the average population. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Refractory Celiac Disease: Refractory Celiac Disease is celiac disease that fails to respond to treatment which involves a gluten-free diet. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The condition is quite uncommon and often the resulting poor absorption of nutrients from the intestines leads to a poor prognosis.
  • Rotavirus: Diarrhea-causing virus in infants.
  • SARS: Serious respiratory infection
  • Salmonella food poisoning: Common type of food poisoning.
  • Scleroderma, systemic: A rare autoimmune connective tissue disease where the body attacks parts of the body and causes scarring and thickness of the tissue. In the systemic form, the skin and organs are involved.
  • Secondary Lactase Deficiency: This form of lactase deficiency results from some sort of damage to the intestines either due to a disease or surgery. Some possible causes include untreated celiac disease, long-term use of antibiotics, giardiasis, carcinoid syndrome, HIV enteropathy, gastrectomy and intestinal resection. Lactase enzyme activity usually develops late in pregnancy so a preterm infant will not yet have developed this enzyme function. The greater the degree of prematurity, the greater the reduction in lactase activity.
  • Severe diarrhea: A condition which is characterized by severe diarrhoea
  • Sexual symptoms: Symptoms affecting the sexual organs
  • Shigellosis: An infectious disease which affects the intestinal tract and is caused by the Shigella bacteria. The condition may be severe, especially in children, but may be asymptomatic in some cases. The disease can be transmitted through fecal-oral contact.
  • Short Bowel Syndrome: Disorder of shortened bowel usually from bowel surgery.
  • Shy- Drager syndrome: also known as multiple system atrophy
  • Somatostatinoma: A very rare disorder where tumors in glands that produce somatostatin affect the secretion of the hormone. The tumor mainly occurs in the pancreas but can also occur in the intestinal tract.
  • Staphylococcal infection: Any infection caused by the bacteria staphylococcal
  • Steatorrhea: A condition which occurs when there is an excess of fat in the faeces
  • Stool symptoms: Changes to stool such as diarrhea
  • Strongyloidiasis: A parasitic infectious disease involving the intestines and caused by the nematode Strongyloides stercoralis. Infection usually occurs in crowded, unsanitized populations.
  • Sucrase-Isomaltase Deficiency: A condition which is characterized by a deficiency of sucrase-isomaltase deficiency
  • Susceptibility to Celiac Disease 1: Susceptibility to celiac disease 1 is a term allocated to a genetic defect on a particular chromosome (chromosome 6p21.3) which makes a patient more susceptible to developing celiac disease. However, it is important to note that having the genetic anomaly does not mean a person will definitely develop celiac disease. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Susceptibility to Celiac Disease 10: Susceptibility to celiac disease 10 is a term allocated to a genetic defect on a particular chromosome (chromosome 3q25-q26) which makes a patient more susceptible to developing celiac disease. However, it is important to note that having the genetic anomaly does not mean a person will definitely develop celiac disease. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Susceptibility to Celiac Disease 11: Susceptibility to celiac disease 11 is a term allocated to a genetic defect on a particular chromosome (chromosome 3q28) which makes a patient more susceptible to developing celiac disease. However, it is important to note that having the genetic anomaly does not mean a person will definitely develop celiac disease. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Susceptibility to Celiac Disease 12: Susceptibility to celiac disease 12 is a term allocated to a genetic defect on a particular chromosome (chromosome 6q25) which makes a patient more susceptible to developing celiac disease. However, it is important to note that having the genetic anomaly does not mean a person will definitely develop celiac disease. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Susceptibility to Celiac Disease 13: Susceptibility to celiac disease 13 is a term allocated to a genetic defect on a particular chromosome (chromosome 12q24) which makes a patient more susceptible to developing celiac disease. However, it is important to note that having the genetic anomaly does not mean a person will definitely develop celiac disease. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Susceptibility to Celiac Disease 2: Susceptibility to celiac disease 2 is a term allocated to a genetic defect on a particular chromosome (chromosome 5q31-q33) which makes a patient more susceptible to developing celiac disease. However, it is important to note that having the genetic anomaly does not mean a person will definitely develop celiac disease. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Susceptibility to Celiac Disease 3: Susceptibility to celiac disease 3 is a term allocated to a genetic defect on a particular chromosome (chromosome 2q33) which makes a patient more susceptible to developing celiac disease. However, it is important to note that having the genetic anomaly does not mean a person will definitely develop celiac disease. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Susceptibility to Celiac Disease 4: Susceptibility to celiac disease 4 is a term allocated to a genetic defect on a particular chromosome (chromosome 19p13.1) which makes a patient more susceptible to developing celiac disease. However, it is important to note that having the genetic anomaly does not mean a person will definitely develop celiac disease. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Susceptibility to Celiac Disease 5: Susceptibility to celiac disease 5 is a term allocated to a genetic defect on a particular chromosome (chromosome 15q11-q13) which makes a patient more susceptible to developing celiac disease. However, it is important to note that having the genetic anomaly does not mean a person will definitely develop celiac disease. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Susceptibility to Celiac Disease 6: Susceptibility to celiac disease 6 is a term allocated to a genetic defect on a particular chromosome (chromosome 4q27) which makes a patient more susceptible to developing celiac disease. However, it is important to note that having the genetic anomaly does not mean a person will definitely develop celiac disease. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Susceptibility to Celiac Disease 7: Susceptibility to celiac disease 7 is a term allocated to a genetic defect on a particular chromosome (chromosome 1q133) which makes a patient more susceptible to developing celiac disease. However, it is important to note that having the genetic anomaly does not mean a person will definitely develop celiac disease. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Susceptibility to Celiac Disease 8: Susceptibility to celiac disease 8 is a term allocated to a genetic defect on a particular chromosome (chromosome 2q11-q12) which makes a patient more susceptible to developing celiac disease. However, it is important to note that having the genetic anomaly does not mean a person will definitely develop celiac disease. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Susceptibility to Celiac Disease 9: Susceptibility to celiac disease 9 is a term allocated to a genetic defect on a particular chromosome (chromosome 3p21) which makes a patient more susceptible to developing celiac disease. However, it is important to note that having the genetic anomaly does not mean a person will definitely develop celiac disease. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Systemic Capillary Leak Syndrome: A rare disease where episodes of leaking blood capillaries results in a rapid drop in blood pressure which can be life-threatening. Episodes usually last for a few days. The range and severity of symptoms experienced may range somewhat amongst patients.
  • Thallium poisoning: The poisoning of a person with the element thallium
  • Toxic Shock Syndrome: Severe immune reaction causing shock
  • Traveler's diarrhea: Various diarrheal conditions often caught on international travel.
  • Trichinosis: Worm infection usually caught from pigs
  • Tropical sprue: A rare digestive disease where the small intestine can't absorb nutrients properly.
  • Turner syndrome associated Celiac Disease: Females with Turner syndrome are more susceptible to developing celiac disease than the average population. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Type 1 diabetes related Celiac Disease: Patients with Type 1 diabetes are more susceptible to developing celiac disease than the average population. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Typhoid fever: Fever from bacterial food poisoning.
  • Ulcerative colitis: Ulcerative colitis (Colitis ulcerosa, UC) is a form of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Ulcerative colitis is a form of colitis, a disease of the intestine, specifically the large intestine or colon, that includes characteristic ulcers, or open sores, in the colon.
  • Urinary difficulty: Various difficulties with urination
  • Urinary problems: Any problems which occur to the urinary tract
  • Urinary symptoms: Symptoms affecting urination or related organs.
  • Urinary tract infection: Infection of the urinary tract
  • Urinary tract infections (child): Infection of the urinary system in children.
  • Ursodeoxycholic Acid -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Ursodeoxycholic Acid during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Vibrio parahaemolyticus: Bacteria commonly infecting oysters and seafood.
  • Viral gastroenteritis: Virus causing gastroenteritis of digestive tract.
  • Visceral leishmaniasis: A tropical disease caused by a protozoan organism and transmitted to humans through sand fly bites. Also called Assam fever, black fever, dumdum fever, ponos or kala-azar.
  • Vitamin B12 Deficiency: A deficiency of Vitamin B12 primarily causes anemias the body is unable to make sufficient quantities of normal red blood cells. Severe cases can lead to permanent nervous system problems. The vitamin B12 deficiency can result from absorption problems, insufficient dietary intake, certain medications (e.g. metformin), inherited conditions (e.g. transcobalamin deficiency) and certain chronic parasitic intestinal infestations.
  • Watery stool: Watery stool is a form of diarrhea
  • Whipple's Disease: Rare malabsorption disease from bacterial digestive infection
  • Whipworm: Any nematode of the genus trichuris
  • William's syndrome associated Celiac Disease: Patients with William's syndrome are more susceptible to developing celiac disease than the average population. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Yersiniosis: A condition which is characterized by infectious diarrhea, enteritis, ileitis and occasionally septicaemia
  • Zinc deficiency: When there is a deficiency of zinc in an individuals body

Conditions listing medical symptoms: Loose stool:

The following list of conditions have 'Loose stool' or similar listed as a symptom in our database. This computer-generated list may be inaccurate or incomplete. Always seek prompt professional medical advice about the cause of any symptom.

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