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Symptoms » Loss of balance » Glossary
 

Glossary for Loss of balance

Medical terms related to Loss of balance or mentioned in this section include:

  • Acanthamoeba infection: Infection with a microscopic, free-living ameba that is readily found in the environment - soil, air and water. Most people exposed to the ameba will not become infected but when infections do occur, they tend to affect the eyes, central nervous system or can cause widespread infection throughout the body.
  • Acanthamoeba infection of the central nervous system: Infection by an amoebic organism called Acanthamoeba. Infection usually occurs when the amoeba enters through a break in the skin or through the nose. Infection can be localized or systemic where it can involve the central nervous system and cause potentially fatal meningoencephalitis. Infection of the eye can occur by cleaning contact lenses in contaminated water.
  • Acoustic neuroma: A rare benign tumor that forms in the hearing canal. Can cause tinnitus, progressive hearing loss, headaches, facial numbness, papilledema, dizziness and an unsteady walk. Speaking and swallowing difficulty can occur in advanced stages. Also called acoustic neurilemoma, acoustic neurinoma and acoustic neurofibroma.
  • Autosomal Dominant Genetic Diseases: Any conditions that are related to any non-sex-determining chromosome
  • Balance symptoms: Problems with balance or vertigo
  • Brain symptoms: Symptoms affecting the brain
  • Brain tumour: various extrinsic and intrinsic factors add up to to cause tumour in the brain
  • Central pontine myelinolysis: A rare condition where the protective layer around brainstem nerve cells is destroyed which prevents nerve signals being transmitted properly. It generally occurs in response to a rapid change in sodium levels in the body which can be caused by treatment of various conditions or by various conditions that cause rapid sodium level changes.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disorder: Degeneration of limb muscles.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (generic term): A group of inherited neurological disorders characterized by problems with the peripheral nerves. Muscle weakness, muscle wasting and sensory problems are the most common symptoms. The severity and age of onset of symptoms varies depending on the specific subtype of the disorder.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease with pyramidal features, autosomal dominant: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. Type 5 has an autosomal dominant inheritance, progresses slowly and involves movement disorders.
  • Clumsiness: Clumsy motions or poor coordination
  • Coordination problems: Symptoms affecting physical coordination.
  • Dentatorubral Pallidoluysian Atrophy: A condition caused by an abnormality of the DNA sequence on chromosome 12
  • Dizziness: Feelings of lightheadedness or giddiness.
  • Drug overdose: A condition characterized by the consumption in excess of a particular drug causing adverse effects
  • Drug poisoning: The poisoning of an individual with a noxious substance
  • Falls: Recurrent unintentional falls
  • Granulomatous amebic encephalitis: Brain/CNS infection from Acanthamoeba bacteria
  • Granulomatous amoebic encephalitis: A rare opportunistic brain infection caused by certain amoeba - Acanthamoeba or Balamuthia amoebae. The amoeba generally only causes encephalitis in people who are immunocompromised or have a chronic disease such as diabetes. The amoeba initially cause pneumonitis or skin ulcers from with the amebas can spread to the brain to cause encephalitis. The condition is often fatal.
  • Grief or loss: The normal emotional response that occurs to an external loss
  • Head injury: Any injury that occurs to the head
  • Head symptoms: Symptoms affecting the head or brain
  • Hereditary inclusion body myopathy -- joint contractures -- ophthalmoplegia: A very rare, dominantly inherited genetic disorder involving progressive muscle weakness and wasting, joint contractures at birth and ophthalmoplegia. Muscle function problems usually don't start until the 4th or 5th decade of life.
  • Inclusion body myopathy 3, autosomal dominant: A very rare, dominantly inherited genetic disorder involving progressive muscle weakness and wasting, joint contractures at birth and ophthalmoplegia. Muscle function problems usually don't start until the 4th or 5th decade of life.
  • Inclusion body myopathy, autosomal dominant: A dominantly inherited muscle wasting disorder in which the thigh muscles are affected first. The rate of progression and severity can vary amongst patients.
  • Inclusion body myopathy, type 3: A dominantly inherited muscle wasting disorder in which the thigh and chest muscles are affected first. The rate of progression and severity can vary amongst patients. Contractures occur from birth and muscle weakness becomes progressive during adulthood (usually between the ages of 30 and 50 years).
  • Inclusion body myopathy, type 3 (IBM3): A dominantly inherited muscle wasting disorder in which the thigh and chest muscles are affected first. The rate of progression and severity can vary amongst patients. Contractures occur from birth and muscle weakness becomes progressive during adulthood (usually between the ages of 30 and 50 years).
  • Inclusion body myopathy, type 3, autosomal dominant: A dominantly inherited muscle wasting disorder in which the thigh and chest muscles are affected first. The rate of progression and severity can vary amongst patients. Contractures occur from birth and muscle weakness becomes progressive during adulthood (usually between the ages of 30 and 50 years).
  • Labrynthitis: Inner ear condition affecting various ear structures
  • Listeriosis: Bacterial food poisoning
  • Movement symptoms: Changes to movement or motor abilities
  • Multiple Sclerosis: Autoimmune attack on spinal nerves causing diverse and varying neural problems.
  • Multiple system atrophy: A rare disorder where nerve degeneration causes progressive neurological problems involving the central and autonomic nervous system. The rate of progression is variable.
  • Muscle symptoms: Symptoms affecting the muscles of the body
  • Musculoskeletal symptoms: Symptoms affecting muscles or bones of the skeleton.
  • Naegleria: Rare bacterial infection from contaminated water
  • Nerve symptoms: Symptoms affecting the nerves
  • Neuroectodermal tumors primitive: A type of brain tumor that consists of small round cells and is believed to originate from primitive nerve cells in the brain. Symptoms are determined by the exact location of the tumor.
  • Neurological symptoms: Any symptoms that are caused by neurological conditions
  • Otosclerosis: Genetic ear bone disorder
  • Parkinson's Disease: Degenerative brain condition characterised by tremor.
  • Postconcussive syndrome: Symptoms that can occur following a head injury.
  • Postural hypotension: The occurrence of hypotension which occurs on transfer from lying to standing
  • Stroke symptoms: Brain-related symptoms of bleeding or blockage.
  • Subdural haematoma:
  • Transient ischemic attack: temporary disturbance of blood supply to a restricted area of the brain, resulting in brief neurologic dysfunction that persists, by definition, for less than 24 hours.
  • Vertigo: Feeling that the room or person is moving or spinning.

Conditions listing medical symptoms: Loss of balance:

The following list of conditions have 'Loss of balance' or similar listed as a symptom in our database. This computer-generated list may be inaccurate or incomplete. Always seek prompt professional medical advice about the cause of any symptom.

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