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Symptoms » Lymphadenopathy » Glossary
 

Glossary for Lymphadenopathy

Medical terms related to Lymphadenopathy or mentioned in this section include:

  • Abdominal symptoms: Symptoms affecting the abdomen or digestive tract
  • Acute lymphoblastic leukemia: A malignant disease that starts suddenly and progresses quickly. It is characterized by a high number of immature cells in the organs, bone marrow and blood. Symptoms include fever, pallor, anorexia, fatigue, anemia, hemorrhage, bone pain, splenomegaly and frequent infections. Also called acute lymphocytic leukemia.
  • Acute lymphocytic leukemia: A malignant disease that starts suddenly and progresses quickly. It is characterized by a high number of immature cells in the organs, bone marrow and blood. Symptoms include fever, pallor, anorexia, fatigue, anemia, hemorrhage, bone pain, splenomegaly and frequent infections. Also called acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
  • Adult T-Cell leukemia: A form of blood cancer affecting the T-cells which make up the body's immune system. The disease is caused by the HTLV-1 virus (human T-cell leukemia virus) which causes the proliferation of abnormal T-cells. The virus can be transmitted sexually and may lay dormant for decades. There are four subtypes: acute, chronic, lymphoma and smoldering. The acute and lymphoma subtypes have the poorest prognosis.
  • African Sleeping sickness: A disease caused by parasites (Trypanosome brucei gamiense or T. brucei rodesiense) and transmitted to humans by the tsetse fly which is found only in Africa. Causes symptoms such as fever, chills, headache, anemia, edema of hands and feet, enlarged lymph glands, lethargy, sleepiness, convulsions and coma. Also called African trypanosomiasis and sleeping sickness.
  • Amyloidosis: A disease characterized by the accumulation of insoluble amyloid protein in tissues and organs which in turn affects the functioning of these tissues and organs.
  • Angiofollicular lymph hyperplasia: A rare disorder of the lymph system characterized by the development of benign tumors in lymph tissue anywhere in the body.
  • Angioimmunoblastic with dysproteinemia lymphadenopathy: A rare immune system disorder which is similar to lymphoma. The condition is progressive but the course varies with some patients surviving a long time without treatment and others surviving only a short period of time.
  • Anthrax: A serious infectious bacterial disease that can be fatal.
  • Apo A-I deficiency: Low plasma HDL cholesterol that tends to run in families.
  • Arthritis -- short stature -- deafness: A very rare syndrome characterized by arthritis, short stature, deafness and numerous other abnormalities.
  • Bartonella: A class of bacteria that can infect humans at a range of different sites. The most well known is Cat Scratch Disease, caused by B.henselae.
  • Bejel: An infectious disease related to syphilis but is transmitted through nonsexual skin contact. Often starts with a sore in the mouth and then progresses to affect the skin and bones.
  • Black widow spider envenomation: The black widow spider bite is toxic to the nerves and can cause serious symptoms. The black widow spider is most commonly found in North America.
  • Bortonneuse fever: A mild infectious disease caused by the bacterium Rickettsia Conorrii. The disease is transmitted by a dog tick (Riphicephalus sanguineus) and is most common in countries bordering the Mediterranean Sea. Incubation usually takes about one week.
  • Breast Cancer: A condition which is characterized by the presence of malignant tissue within breast tissue
  • Breast cancer: A condition which is characterized by the presence of malignant tissue within breast tissue
  • Brucellosis: An infectious disease caused by the Brucella genus which is transmitted from animals to humans.
  • Caspase-8 deficiency: A rare type of immunodeficiency disorder caused by a deficiency of caspase-8. Caspase-8 an important part of the immune system as it is involved in the activation of T lymphocytes, B lymphocytes and natural killer cells.
  • Cat scratch disease: An infectious disease transmitted through a cat's bite, scratch or lick and resulting primarily in lymph node pain and swelling. The condition can be mild or severe.
  • Cervical lymphadenopathy: The enlargement of the cervical lymph nodes
  • Chagas disease: A parasitic infection caused by the protozoa Trypanosoma cruzi and transmitted by insect bites or blood transfusions. The disease primarily involves the heart and gastrointestinal system.
  • Chediak-Higashi like syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized mainly by albinism (lack of pigmentation). There are three different subtypes of the disorder (I, II and III) each with varying additional features such as immunodeficiency and neurological symptoms. Type 1 involves partial albinism and neurological symptoms, type II involves partial albinism, immunodeficiency and sometimes neurological symptoms and type III involves albinism only.
  • Chronic lymphocytic leukemia: A cancer of the blood and bone marrow where too many abnormal lymphocytes (white blood cells) are produced which eventually crowds out healthy blood cells in the body.
  • Coccidioidomycosis: An infectious fungal disease caused by inhaling the spores of a particular bacteria. Also called desert fever, desert rheumatism, San Joaquin fever and valley fever.
  • Colorectal cancer: Cancer of the colon (bowel) or rectum.
  • Common Variable Immunodeficiency: An immunodeficiency disorder involving low blood gamma globulin levels which results in an increased susceptibility to infections. The condition may be inherited or can be caused by certain drugs (levamisole, hydantoin and carbamazepine).
  • Congenital Toxoplasmosis: Fetal infection with toxoplasmosis.
  • Congenital tuberculosis: Fetal infection with tuberculosis
  • Cowpox: A skin disease caused by the cowpox virus. The virus tends to occur in cows but can be transmitted to humans. Exposure usually occurs when hand-milking infected cows.
  • Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma: A malignancy of the T-cells which make up part of the body's immune system. The cancer is characterized by the excessive proliferation of T-cells which are a type of white blood cell. The degree of skin involvement is variable.
  • Cystic Hygroma: A progressive condition characterized by a sac filled with lymphatic fluid that forms in the lymphatic system, usually at the nape of the neck but sometimes in other parts of the body.
  • Cytomegalovirus: A easily transmissible viral infection that is common but generally causes no symptoms except in infants and people with weakened immune systems.
  • Dengue fever: An acute viral disease characterized by fever, rash and myalgia and caused by a flavivirus which is transmitted by mosquitoes.
  • Edema: The abnormal retention of fluid in a given anatomical area
  • Epstein-Barr virus: Common virus causing mononucleosis
  • Epstein-Barr virus, chronic: A form of human herpes virus that produces persistent symptoms. Most people become infected with the virus at some stage in their life though they usually have few if any symptoms. However, some people develop severe symptoms as a result of an EBV infection.
  • Erythroderma: Condition with thickening and flaking skin
  • Ethotoin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Ethotoin (an anticonvulsant drug) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Fever: Raised body temperature usually with other symptoms.
  • Generalised lymphadenopathy: A generalised enlargement of the lymph node glands of the body.
  • Generalized lymphadenopathy:
  • Gingivostomatitis: Mouth infection typically from first exposure to cold sores and subsequent viral HSV-1 infection.
  • Granuloma inguinale: Granulomous disease spread sexually.
  • Griscelli disease: A rare genetic disorder characterized mainly by albinism (lack of pigmentation). There are three different subtypes of the disorder (I, II and III) each with varying additional features such as immunodeficiency and neurological symptoms. Type 1 involves partial albinism and neurological symptoms, type II involves partial albinism, immunodeficiency and sometimes neurological symptoms and type III involves albinism, only.
  • Griscelli syndrome type II: A rare genetic condition characterized by a partial lack of pigmentation in the eye, skin and hair, clumps of pigmentation in hair shafts, immunodeficiency and neurological symptoms.
  • HIV/AIDS: HIV is a sexually transmitted virus and AIDS is the progressive immune failure that HIV causes.
  • Hemangiopericytoma: A slow growing tumor that develops in deep soft tissues an tends to occur mainly in the abdomen (pelvic retroperitoneum specifically), hips, shoulders, upper arms and upper legs.
  • Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis: A condition which is characterized by an abnormal appearance of histiocytes in the blood
  • Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, familial, 1: A rare recessively inherited disorder involving an overactive immune system. More specifically, the body becomes infiltrated by large numbers of histiocytes (macrophages) that accumulate in various organs such as the liver, spleen, bone marrow, skin and central nervous system. It usually only occurs in infants and young children and can be life-threatening.
  • Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, familial, 2: A rare recessively inherited disorder involving an overactive immune system. More specifically, the body becomes infiltrated by large numbers of histiocytes (macrophages) that accumulate in various organs such as the liver, spleen, bone marrow, skin and central nervous system. It usually only occurs in infants and young children. Type 2 is caused by a defect on chromosome 10q22.
  • Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, familial, 3: A rare recessively inherited disorder involving an overactive immune system. More specifically, the body becomes infiltrated by large numbers of histiocytes (macrophages) that accumulate in various organs such as the liver, spleen, bone marrow, skin and central nervous system. It usually only occurs in infants and young children. Type 3 is caused by a defect on chromosome 17q25.1.
  • Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, familial, 4: A rare recessively inherited disorder involving an overactive immune system. More specifically, the body becomes infiltrated by large numbers of histiocytes (macrophages) that accumulate in various organs such as the liver, spleen, bone marrow, skin and central nervous system. It usually only occurs in infants and young children. Type 4 is caused by a defect on chromosome 6q24.
  • Hemophagocytic reticulosis: The abnormal proliferation of reticulum cell (histiocytes) which infiltrate various organs and. Macrophages destroy blood cells causing blood abnormalities. Meningoencephalitis frequently occurs when the histiocytes infiltrate the mininges and cerebral tissue. Symptoms start at birth or soon after and become progressively worse without treatment. Medication can control the condition but a hematopoietic stem cell transplant is needed to achieve remission.
  • Hepatitis A: Contagious viral infection of the liver
  • Hepatitis B: Viral liver infection spread by sex or body fluids.
  • Herpes: Virus with one subtype causing cold sores and another causing genital herpes.
  • Histiocytosis, Non-Langerhans-Cell: A group of disorders involving the excessive proliferation of histiocytes (macrophages) which are not Langerhans cells. Subgroups of this disorder includes hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, sinus histiocytosis, xanthogranuloma and sea-blue histiocyte syndrome. Sometimes only the skin is involved and in other cases there may be systemic involvement which can cause serious problems.
  • Histoplasmosis: Lung infection from fungus Histoplasma capsulatum
  • Hodgkin's Disease: A form of cancer that affects the lymphatic system.
  • Hyperthyroidism: The excessive activity of the thyroid gland
  • Hypopigmented lesions in children: Hypopigmented lesions in children refers are sores or ulcers that are colorless or have lost color in a child.
  • Immune symptoms: Symptoms affecting the immune system
  • Infection: Infections as a symptom.
  • Juvenile idiopathic arthritis: A group of chronic inflammatory joint disorders that affects children. The condition generally involves periods of time where the condition is active followed by periods of abatement of symptoms. In some cases, the condition can be systemic and can cause symptoms such as fever and rash with organ involvement. There are three main types of juvenile idiopathic arthritis - oligoarticular, polyarticular and systemic (Still's disease).
  • Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis: A condition which is characterized by proliferation of Langerhans cells
  • Large granular lymphocyte leukemia: A form of leukemia characterized by an increased number of circulating granular lymphocytes.
  • Lassa fever: Infectious rat-borne West African disease.
  • Leishmaniasis: A rare infectious disease caused by any of a number of parasitic Leishmania species. Infection can cause any of three different manifestations: cutaneous leishmaniasis, mucosal leishmaniasis and visceral leishmaniasis.
  • Leprosy: Hypopigmented lesions in children refers are sores or ulcers that are colorless or have lost color in a child.
  • Leukemia: Cancer of the blood cells, usually white blood cells.
  • Lip cancer: It is the main type of oral cancer. Cancer involving the lips
  • Lipogranulomatosis: A condition where abnormal lipid metabolism results in the development of yellow liquid-filled nodules in the skin and mucosal linings. The tissue surrounding the nodules can become inflamed as a result of these abnormal deposits. Symptoms are variable depending on the number and location of the nodules.
  • Lupus: chronic autoimmune disease that can be fatal, though with recent medical advances, fatalities are becoming increasingly rare.
  • Lymph symptoms: Symptoms affecting the lymphatic system or lymph nodes
  • Lymphadenitis: Inflammation that occurs in the lymph nodes
  • Lymphadenopathy, angioimmunoblastic with dysproteinemia: A progressive immune system disorder that usually affects people over the age of 50 and is characterized by chills, sweating, weight loss, skin rashes.
  • Lymphangiomas: A form of angioma caused by lymph vessels
  • Lymphangitis: Inflammation of a lymph node or lymphatic vessel.
  • Lymphatic Filariasis: Parasitic worm infection of the lympatic system
  • Lymphedema: Swelling of a region due to obstruction of lymphatic vessels
  • Lymphogranuloma venereum: Type of chlamydia (sexually transmitted disease)
  • Lymphoma, Large-Cell, Follicular: A cancer of cells in the immune system. The cancer is comprised of large cells and tends to be aggressive and metastasizes readily.
  • Lymphoma, large-cell: A cancer of cells in the immune system. The cancer is comprised of large cells and tends to be aggressive and metastasizes readily.
  • Lymphoma, large-cell, immunoblastic: A cancer of the immune system characterized by the presence of immunoblasts. Immunoblasts are T cells which have been transformed due to stimulation by an antigen.
  • Lymphoma, small cleaved-cell, diffuse: A slow-growing cancer of the lymph system that involves small cells. The diffuse form has no distinguishable pattern of progression through the lymph node.
  • Lymphoma, small cleaved-cell, follicular: A slow-growing cancer of the lymph system consisting of small cells that can circulate readily in the blood. The cancer occurs in a follicular pattern. Despite it's ability to spread, the cancer tends to be less aggressive than the large cell variety.
  • Measles: Once common viral infection now rare due to vaccination.
  • Melanoma: Melanoma is the most dangerous type of skin cancer. It is the leading cause of death from skin disease. It involves cells called melanocytes, which produce a skin pigment called melanin. Melanin is responsible for skin and hair color.
  • Mendelian susceptibility to atypical mycobacteria: A very rare group of disorders where a person without an immune deficiency is susceptible to infection by weak mycobacterial organisms, nontuberculous and environmental mycobacteria e.g. Calmette-Guerin Bacillus (BCG). The severity of the disorder is greatly variable and ranges from a localized recurring non-tuberculous mycobacterial infection to a potentially fatal BCG infection. Most people who are infected with these organisms have no symptoms but a genetic mutation in some people makes them more susceptible.
  • Merkel cell cancer: A rapidly growing, aggressive form of skin cancer that occur on or just under the skin.
  • Mesenteric Adenitis: Swollen abdominal lymph nodes
  • Mononucleosis: Common infectious virus.
  • Mycosis fungoides: Mycosis fungoides is a rare form of T-cell lymphoma of the skin. The disease is typically slowly progressive and chronic.
  • Nerve symptoms: Symptoms affecting the nerves
  • Niemann-Pick disease: A rare inherited biochemical disorder involving the deficiency of an enzyme (acid sphingomyelinase) needed to break down certain lipids which results in an accumulation of these lipids in the body.
  • Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma: A condition which is any neoplastic disorder of the lymphoid tissue
  • Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: A condition which is any neoplastic disorder of the lymphoid tissue
  • Opisthorchiasis: Infection with a type of fluke (Southeast Asian liver fluke or cat liver fluke). Infection usually occurs by consuming infected undercooked fish. Acute infection may cause fever, joint pain, rash, eosinophilia and lymphadenopathy where as chronic infections may cause enlarged liver, malnutrition. Mild cases can cause constipation, diarrhea and abdominal pain. Occasionally, the infection may be asymptomatic and in the other extreme, severe cases may result in complications such as cholangiocarcinoma.
  • Paracoccidioidomycosis: Infection by the fungus Paracoccidiodes brasiliensis which usually affects the lungs but can also involve the skin, mucous membranes, lymphatic system and other parts of the body.
  • Pinta: A tropical American skin disease that only affects dark-skinned races. It is caused by an organism the causes thickening and loss of pigmentation of the skin.
  • Plague: Any epidemic disease with a high death rate.
  • Plasma cell leukemia: A form of leukemia characterized by the proliferation of plasma cells in the peripheral blood system. The prognosis is generally poor for this usually aggressive condition.
  • Possible human carcinogenic exposure -- Phenytoin: Some evidence indicates that exposure to Phenytoin (an anticonvulsant medication) has a possible link to an increased risk of developing cancer in humans. The carcinogenicity of the substance may be influenced by the duration and level of exposure.
  • Protozoan Conditions: Any condition caused by the infection of the human being by a protozoan organism
  • Rat-bite fever: A disease caused by a rat bite where the patient becomes infected by a bacteria (causes skin ulceration and recurrent fever) or a fungus (causes skin inflammation, muscle pain and vomiting). Also called sodokosis.
  • Reticuloendotheliosis: An inherited disorder of the reticuloendothelial system which is involved in destroying bacteria and other unwanted substances that enter the body.
  • Rhabditida Infections: Infection with a parasitic worm from the order rhabditida. The symptoms are determined by the species involved.
  • Rhabdomyosarcoma: Soft tissue cancer occurring in children
  • Rheumatoid arthritis: An autoimmune inflammatory condition which primarily affects the joints
  • Rhodococcus equi: A rare form of bacterial infection that usually affects horses and foals but can cause infection mainly in immunocompromised people. Infection usually starts at the site of some sort of trauma. Symptoms and severity may vary considerably depending on the location and extent of the infection.
  • River Blindness: Skin and eye infection caused by the helminth (worm) 'Onchocerca volvulus', transmitted via fly bites and usually seen only in parts of Africa, the Middle East and South America
  • Rosai-Dorfman disease: A rare condition characterized by excessive production and accumulation of a particular white blood cell (histiocyte). Accumulation primarily occurs in the lymph nodes, especially in the neck, but may also occur in the skin, central nervous system, digestive tract and kidneys.
  • Rubella: A contagious viral infection caused by the Rubella virus which produces a rash and lymph node swelling. It can have serious implication in pregnant women as the virus can be transmitted through the placenta and cause serious fetal defects or even fetal death.
  • Sarcoid: A fleshy tumor.
  • Sarcoidosis: Rare autoimmune disease usually affecting the lungs.
  • Scrub typhus: Type of typhus usually caught from ticks
  • Secernentea Infections: Infection with a type of parasitic nematode (worm). The symptoms are highly variable depending on where the worm migrates to through out the body and which particular species is involved. Some examples of nematodes are Wuchereria, Spirurina, Mansonella, Drucunculus, Loa and Ascaris.
  • Secondary syphilis: A condition which is characterized by fever, multiform skin eruptions, iritis, alopecia, mucous patches and severe pain in the head and joints
  • Sennetsu Fever: A rare infectious disease caused by a bacteria called Ehrlichia sennetsu.
  • Septicemia: A systemic inflammatory response to an infection.
  • Serum sickness: Type of allergic reaction to certain medications or serums
  • Sexually Transmitted Diseases: Various diseases spread by sexual contact.
  • Siccardi syndrome: A rare disorder characterized by impaired immunity (due to defective bacterial destruction by neutrophils), lymphadenopathy and abnormal skin and hair color.
  • Skin symptoms: Symptoms affecting the skin.
  • Smallpox: Dangerous virus now almost eliminated worldwide by vaccination.
  • Spider Bites: A puncture wound caused by a spider that may involve the release of noxious substances or bacteria.
  • Sporotrichosis: A fungal skin infection caused by the fungus Sporothrix schenckii. Usually only the skin is infected but bones, lungs and central nervous system can rarely be affected also. Transmission usually occurs through infection of a skin wound.
  • Spotted fevers: An acute condition caused by the bacteria Rickettsia rickettsii
  • Stomach cancer: Stomach or gastric cancer can develop in any part of the stomach and may spread throughout the stomach and to other organs
  • Swelling symptoms: Symptoms causing swelling or enlargement.
  • Swollen glands: Swelling of glands or lymph nodes
  • Swollen lymph nodes: Swelling or enlargement of the lymph nodes
  • Syphilis: A sexually transmitted disease caused by a bacteria (Treponema pallidum). The condition is often asymptomatic in the early stages but one or more sores may be present in the early stages. Untreated syphilis usually results in remission of visible symptoms but further severe damage may occur to internal organs and other body tissues which can result in death.
  • Systemic lupus erythematosus: chronic autoimmune disease that can be fatal, though with recent medical advances, fatalities are becoming increasingly rare.
  • Systemic mastocytosis: A condition which is characterized by an accumulation of mast cells in the tissues of the body
  • Tang Hsi Ryu syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by enlarged liver and spleen, increased pigmentation and abnormal peripheral nerve functioning.
  • Toxoplasmosis: Infection often caught from cats and their feces.
  • Trypanosomiasis:
  • Trypanosomiasis, east-African: A rare infectious disease caused by a parasite called Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense and is transmitted through the bite of an infected Tsetse fly. The infection causes an acute illness with symptoms occurring from days to weeks after infection. Death relatively common, especially in untreated cases.
  • Tuberculosis: Bacterial infection causing nodules forming, most commonly in the lung.
  • Tularemia: A rare infections disease caused by the bacterium Francisella tularensis (a gram-negative pleomorphic coccobacillus). Transmission occurs through contact with infected animals or there habitats e.g. bites from infected insects or other animals, eating infected wild animals, contact with contaminated water and soil. Symptoms can vary greatly depending on the method of infection. For example infection through inhalation can cause symptoms similar to pneumonia, eating infected animals can cause a sore throat and abdominal symptoms and transmission through the skin can cause result in a painful skin ulcer.
  • Typhus fever: A general name for various arthropod-borne rickettsial infections
  • Visceral leishmaniasis: A tropical disease caused by a protozoan organism and transmitted to humans through sand fly bites. Also called Assam fever, black fever, dumdum fever, ponos or kala-azar.
  • Visceral leishmaniasis (kala-azar): A rare infectious disease caused by any of a number of parasitic Leishmania species. Infection can cause any of three different manifestations: cutaneous leishmaniasis, mucosal leishmaniasis and visceral leishmaniasis. Visceral leishmaniasis infection involves the spleen, liver and bone marrow and can be fatal if untreated.
  • WT limb blood syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by blood and limb abnormalities.
  • Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia: A rare disorder involving malignancy of the lymph and blood cells.
  • Western equine encephalitis: An infectious disease caused by an arbovirus (Alphavirus - Togaviraidae) and transmitted by infected mosquitoes. The infection primarily attacks that central nervous system and severity can range from asymptomatic to severe complications and even death in rare cases.
  • Whipple's Disease: Rare malabsorption disease from bacterial digestive infection
  • Wuchereria bancrofti: An infectious disease caused by a thin, white, threadworm which affects the lymphatic circulation. It is transmitted through the bite of a mosquito.
  • X-linked agammaglobulinaemia: A condition that is characterised by the x linked inheritance of the absence of all immunoglobulins in the blood
  • X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome: A rare inherited immunodeficiency disorder where the body's immune systm is unable to respond appropriately to certain viral infections (Epstein Barr virus).
  • Yaws: A rare infections disease caused by the spiral-shaped bacteria Treponema pertenue. The disease consists of three phases: skin lesions are followed by bone, joint and widespread skin symptoms and finally by inflammation and destruction of cartilage in the nose, pharynx and palate. Transmission can be through direct contact with infected skin, insect bites or sex.

Conditions listing medical symptoms: Lymphadenopathy:

The following list of conditions have 'Lymphadenopathy' or similar listed as a symptom in our database. This computer-generated list may be inaccurate or incomplete. Always seek prompt professional medical advice about the cause of any symptom.

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