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Pelvic pain Assessment Questionnaire

Questions Your Doctor May Ask - and Why!

During a consultation, your doctor will use various techniques to assess the symptom: Pelvic pain. These will include a physical examination and possibly diagnostic tests. (Note: A physical exam is always done, diagnostic tests may or may not be performed depending on the suspected condition) Your doctor will ask several questions when assessing your condition. It is important to openly share any pertinent information to help your doctor make an accurate diagnosis.

It is also very important to bring an up-to-date list of all of your all medical conditions, medications including dosages, and names of numbers of any specialist you see.

Create your printable checklist by answering questions that your doctor may ask below:

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  1. How long have you had pelvic pain?

    Why: to determine if acute or chronic. The diagnosis of acute pelvic pain is usually easier than chronic pelvic pain due to accurate pregnancy testing, pelvic ultrasound scan and laparoscopy.

  2. Where exactly is the pelvic pain?

    Why: e.g. "Can you point with one finger where the pain is worst.

  3. How would you explain the nature of the pelvic pain?

    Why: e.g. sharp sudden pain in the pelvis which becomes more generalized indicates rupture of an ectopic pregnancy or rupture of an ovarian cyst.

  4. How severe is the pain?

    Why: e.g. does it interfere with daily activities; does it prevent you going to work; does it confine you to bed.

  5. Does the pain radiate to other areas?

    Why: e.g. disorders of the bladder, rectum, lower uterus, cervix and upper vagina can refer pain to the lower back, buttocks and back of the thigh. Must also remember that disorders of the lumbosacral spine can cause pain to refer to the lower abdomen and groin.

  6. What makes the pain worse?
  7. What makes the pain improve?

    Why: e.g. mittelschmerz tends to be relieved by sitting or supporting the lower abdomen.

  8. Have you had this type of pelvic pain in the past?

    Why: will help diagnosis e.g. recurrent mid-cycle pain (i.e. Day 14 of the menstrual cycle) suggests mittelschmerz (pelvic pain occurring at the time of ovulation due to mild bleeding from the ovulation site); recurrent pelvic pain during menstruation would suggest the various causes of dysmenorrhea (painful periods) or endometriosis.

  9. Menstrual period history, including days of bleeding, length of cycle and regularity of cycle?
  10. Is the pain related to the menstrual cycle?

    Why: e.g. If pain is in the middle of the menstrual cycle (i.e. Day 14), this suggests mittelschmerz (pelvic pain occurring at the time of ovulation due to mild bleeding from the ovulation site); if pelvic pain occurs during menstruation this would suggest the various causes of dysmenorrhea (painful periods) or endometriosis.

  11. History of trauma?

    Why: may suggest pelvic bone fracture.

  12. Past medical history?

    Why: e.g. patients on hemodialysis for chronic renal failure are especially predisposed to osteomyelitis which may occur in the pubic bones and cause pelvic pain.

  13. Past surgical history?

    Why: e.g. previous abdominal or pelvic surgery increases the risk of pelvic adhesions which may be the cause of pelvic pain as well as painful menstrual periods, infertility and intestinal pain; previous termination of pregnancy, dilatation and curettage for miscarriage, insertion of Intra-uterine contraceptive device (IUCD) may introduce bacteria to upper genital tract and increase the risk of pelvic inflammatory disease which may cause pelvic pain; previous fallopian tube surgery increases the risk of ectopic pregnancies; surgical correction of bone fractures and operations on bone and joints increase the risk of osteomyelitis which may occur in the pubic bones and cause pelvic pain.

  14. Previous intra-uterine contraceptive device (IUCD)?

    Why: will increase the risk of pelvic inflammatory disease and consequent ectopic pregnancy.

  15. Sexual history?

    Why: especially if involved in unsafe sex without condoms when not in a monogamous relationship which will increase the risk of sexually transmitted diseases and pelvic inflammatory disease and may be the cause of pelvic pain.

  16. Past history of sexually transmitted diseases (STD)?

    Why: Past history of Chlamydia and gonorrhea will increase the risk of pelvic inflammatory disease and also ectopic pregnancy.

  17. Illicit drug use?

    Why: e.g. intravenous drug abusers are especially prone to osteomyelitis which may occur in the pubic bones and cause pelvic pain.

  18. Family history?

    Why: e.g. endometriosis, ovarian cancer.

  19. Fever?

    Why: would suggest pelvic inflammatory disease, diverticulitis, appendicitis, urinary tract infection or osteomyelitis.

  20. Vaginal discharge?

    Why: The presence of a pus-like vaginal discharge with pelvic pain would suggest pelvic inflammatory disease.

  21. Heavy menstrual periods or irregular menstrual periods?

    Why: would suggest ectopic pregnancy, threatened miscarriage, retained placenta, fibroids in the uterus or endometriosis.

  22. Is there any abnormal vaginal bleeding (bleeding after menopause, bleeding in between the periods or bleeding after intercourse?

    Why: can help determine cause.

  23. Dyspareunia (pain with intercourse)?

    Why: may suggest endometriosis, pelvic inflammatory disease, ovarian cysts or ovarian tumor.

  24. Infertility?

    Why: may suggest endometriosis, pelvic inflammatory disease or pelvic adhesions.

  25. Constipation?

    Why: Constipation may cause pelvic pain itself. Constipation may also indicate diverticulitis, irritable bowel disease or endometriosis.

  26. Blood in the stool?

    Why: may suggest diverticulitis.

  27. Mucous in stool?

    Why: may suggest irritable bowel syndrome.

  28. Symptoms of pregnancy?

    Why: e.g. missed menstrual periods, tender breasts, enlarged breasts, urinary frequency - would suggest and ectopic pregnancy or a threatened miscarriage.

  29. Symptoms of mittelschmerz (pelvic pain occurring at the time of ovulation due to mild bleeding from the ovulation site)?

    Why: e.g. recurrent sharp self-limiting pain on one side of the pelvis. Pain is relieved by sitting or supporting the lower abdomen. Pain lasts from a few minutes to hours.

  30. Symptoms of endometriosis?

    Why: e.g. pelvic pain which may start 1-2 weeks before the menstrual period and then reduces with the onset of the period; pain with intercourse; infertility or subfertility; heavy periods and non-specific pelvic pain.

  31. Symptoms of pelvic inflammatory disease?

    Why: e.g. fever (if acute infection) , mild to severe pelvic pain, pain with intercourse, painful heavy or irregular periods, bleeding in-between the periods, abnormal and perhaps offensive pus-like vaginal discharge, painful or frequent urination.

  32. Symptoms of malignant ovarian tumor?

    Why: e.g. ache or discomfort in lower abdomen or pelvis, sensation of pelvic heaviness, menstrual dysfunction, pain with intercourse and 10-20% of people with a malignant ovarian tumor may have pain with menstruation.

  33. Symptoms of a ruptured ovarian cyst?

    Why: e.g. cysts tend to rupture just before ovulation or after sexual intercourse and cause a sudden onset of pain in one or other sides of the pelvis. May be associated with nausea and vomiting.

  34. Symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome?

    Why: e.g. alternating diarrhea and constipation, abdominal bloating, abdominal or pelvic pain that is relieved by opening the bowels or passing wind.

  35. Symptoms of diverticulitis?

    Why: e.g. left lower abdominal pain and fever. May have bloody stool.

  36. Symptoms of urinary tract infection?

    Why: e.g. pain and burning with urination, urinary frequency, loin pain, lower pelvic or bladder pain, fever, blood in urine.

Conditions listing medical symptoms: Pelvic pain:

The following list of conditions have 'Pelvic pain' or similar listed as a symptom in our database. This computer-generated list may be inaccurate or incomplete. Always seek prompt professional medical advice about the cause of any symptom.

Select from the following alphabetical view of conditions which include a symptom of Pelvic pain or choose View All.

View All A B C D E F G H I K L M N O P R S T U V Y

Conditions listing medical complications: Pelvic pain:

The following list of medical conditions have 'Pelvic pain' or similar listed as a medical complication in our database.

 

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