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Symptoms » Posture symptoms » Glossary
 

Glossary for Posture symptoms

Medical terms related to Posture symptoms or mentioned in this section include:

  • Abnormal posture: A posture that varies from what is considered normal
  • Abnormal posture in children: Abnormal posture in children is an irregular or malformed posture in children.
  • Acroosteolysis neurogenic: A very rare inherited condition characterized mainly by the loss of all sensations - the lose the ability to feel pain, temperature and touch. The loss of sensation generally starts at the toes and fingers and spreads up the limbs and the trunk may also be involved in some cases.
  • Acute meningitis: Acute meningitis is an inflammation of the brain that presents in an acute fashion. The inflammation may be the result of infective agents such as bacteria, viruses and fungi as well as non-infective agents such as certain drugs. Acute forms of meningitis can develop in within hours or days whereas chronic meningitis develops over weeks or months.
  • Altered posture: Altered posture is any change in a person's posture.
  • Amyloidosis: A disease characterized by the accumulation of insoluble amyloid protein in tissues and organs which in turn affects the functioning of these tissues and organs.
  • Ankylosing spondylarthritis: Inflammation of one or more spine joints. The spine becomes progressively painful and stiff and the spine joints may eventually fuse and cause disability. The condition may vary from mild to severe. Inflammation can affect other joints and tissues.
  • Arnold-Chiari malformation type 3: An extremely rare malformation where the base of the brain enters into the upper spinal canal. Type 3 involves the herniation of brain or brain stem tissue out of the back of the neck or head. The condition generally has a poor prognosis.
  • Bacterial meningitis: Bacterial meningitis is a form of meningitis caused by bacteria that normally lives in the mouth and throat. When the immune system is unable to supress this bacteria, it travels to the cerebrospinal spinal fluid in the brain. From there it affects the membranes surrounding the brain.
  • Behavioral symptoms: Symptoms of personal behavior.
  • Blood vessel symptoms: Symptoms affecting the blood vessels
  • Body symptoms: Symptoms affecting the entire body features.
  • Botulism food poisoning: Extremely dangerous food poisoning requiring medical attention, but not always recognized because of its non-abdominal symptoms.
  • Brain symptoms: Symptoms affecting the brain
  • Bronchopulmonary dysplasia: A condition which is characterized by dysplasia of the brochopulmonary vessels
  • Catatonia: Motor muscle function disorder
  • Chemical poisoning -- Strychnine: Strychnine is used as a rodenticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Congenital SMA with arthrogryposis: Type of SMA (genetic motor neuron disease) appearing from birth
  • Decerebrate posture: Patients with decorticate posturing present with the arms flexed, or bent inward on the chest, the hands are clenched into fists, and the legs extended and feet turned inward
  • Decerebrate posture in children: Decerebrate posture in children is abnormal posturing in a child that generally indicates a serious brain injury or pathology.
  • Decerebrate posturing: Rigid extension of a persons legs as a result of decerebration.
  • Decerebrate rigidity: is a condition of increased muscle tone and stretch reflexes, particularly in extensor muscles
  • Decorticate posture: complete extensor response
  • Decorticate posture in children: Decorticate posture in children is abnormal posturing in a child that generally indicates a serious brain injury or pathology.
  • Dermatocardioskeletal syndrome, Boronne type: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by thick skin, thick gums, acne, short fingers and a heart defect.
  • Down's syndrome-like hypotonia: Hypotonia is not a specific medical disorder, but a potential manifestation of many different diseases and disorders that affect motor nerve control by the brain or muscle strength.
  • Dystonia 13, torsion: A rare genetic movement disorder. The muscles contract involuntarily causing repetitive twisting movements. Type 13 is caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 1p36.32-p36.13. Symptoms start in the upper body or arms and progresses to other parts of the body. The severity of the disorder is variable.
  • Dystonia 14: A rare genetic movement disorder. The muscles contract involuntarily causing involuntary movements. Type 14 is caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 14q13.
  • Dystonia 4, Torsion, Autosomal Dominant: An inherited movement disorder where the muscles contract and contort uncontrollably due to neurological dysfunction. Usually speech is affected first.
  • Dystonia 6, torsion: A rare inherited movement disorder where the patient suffers involuntary muscle contractions and distortion of body position. Symptoms usually start in one limb and then spread to other limbs.
  • Dystonia 7, torsion: A rare dominantly inherited movement disorder. The muscles contract involuntarily causing involuntary twisting movements. Type 7 is caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 18p. The severity of the condition is variable and usually only one part of the body is affected such as the neck.
  • Dystonia musculorum deformans type 1: A rare movement disorder where the patient suffers involuntary muscle contractions and distortion of body position. The trunk, neck and limbs are usually involved first.
  • Dystonia musculorum deformans type 2: A rare recessively inherited movement disorder where the patient suffers involuntary muscle contractions and distortion of body position. The hands and feet are usually involved first.
  • Encephalopathy due to GLUT1 deficiency: A rare inherited metabolic disorder where a genetic mutation results in the deficiency of an enzyme called glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase which is required to metabolise certain amino acids (lysine, hydroxylysine and tryptophan). Problems occur when these metabolites build up in the body and cause neurological problems. Symptoms often develop following an acute infection or fasting. The severity of the condition is highly variable from development of neurological symptoms during infancy to asymptomatic adults. The degree of enzyme deficiency will usually determine the severity.
  • Enhanced postural hypotensive reaction: A condition which is summarized by an excessive drop in ones blood pressure from lying to standing
  • Familial dysautonomia: An inherited biochemical disorder that primarily affects the autonomic and sensory nervous system.
  • GM1 gangliosidosis: A rare biochemical disorder involving a deficiency of an enzyme (beta-galactosidase A) which results in the accumulation of harmful chemicals (GM1 gangliosides) in the central nervous system and other body tissues. Type 1 is a severe infantile form of the disorder and involves a greater degree of accumulation than type II or III.
  • Gangliosidosis generalized GM1, type 1: A rare biochemical disorder involving a deficiency of an enzyme (beta-galactosidase A) which results in the accumulation of harmful chemicals (GM1 gangliosides) in the central nervous system and other body tissues. Type 1 is a severe infantile form of the disorder and involves a greater degree of accumulation than type II or III.
  • Gaucher disease -- perinatal lethal form: A rare syndrome characterized by the association of abnormally tight skin and Gaucher disease which is a lipid storage disease. This is the most severe form of Gaucher disease.
  • Genetic Parkinson disease: A type of Parkinson disease that results from a genetic anomaly. There are a more than ten different genes that can cause Parkinson disease.
  • Glutaric Acidemia Type I: A condition which results in an inability to process the amino acids lysine, hydroxylysine and tryptophan
  • Glutaric aciduria 1: A rare inherited metabolic disorder where a genetic mutation results in the deficiency of an enzyme called glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase which is required to metabolise certain amino acids (lysine, hydroxylysine and tryptophan). Problems occur when these metabolites build up in the body and cause neurological problems. Symptoms often develop following an acute infection or fasting. The severity of the condition is highly variable from development of neurological symptoms during infancy to asymptomatic adults. The degree of enzyme deficiency will usually determine the severity.
  • Glutaricaciduria I: A rare inherited enzyme deficiency disorder where deficiency of the glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase enzyme results in dystonia, dyskinesia and sometimes mental retardation.
  • Glutaricaciduria type 1: A rare inherited metabolic disorder where a genetic mutation results in the deficiency of an enzyme called glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase which is required to metabolise certain amino acids (lysine, hydroxylysine and tryptophan). Problems occur when these metabolites build up in the body and cause neurological problems. Symptoms often develop following an acute infection or fasting. The severity of the condition is highly variable from development of neurological symptoms during infancy to asymptomatic adults. The degree of enzyme deficiency will usually determine the severity.
  • Glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency: A rare inherited metabolic disorder where a genetic mutation results in the deficiency of an enzyme called glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase which is required to metabolise certain amino acids (lysine, hydroxylysine and tryptophan). Problems occur when these metabolites build up in the body and cause neurological problems. Symptoms often develop following an acute infection or fasting. The severity of the condition is highly variable from development of neurological symptoms during infancy to asymptomatic adults. The degree of enzyme deficiency will usually determine the severity.
  • Gradual onset of stooped posture: Gradual onset of stooped posture is the slow deterioration of a normal upright and straight posture.
  • Head symptoms: Symptoms affecting the head or brain
  • Hemihypertrophy in context of NF: Enlargement of one side of the body that frequently occurs in sufferers of neurofibromatosis.
  • Hereditary methemoglobinemia, recessive, type II: A rare inherited blood disorder where the hemoglobin (the oxygen-carrying part of red blood cells) can't bind with oxygen which impairs the oxygen supply to parts of the body, especially during exertion when more oxygen is needed by the body. The type II form of Gibson syndrome is more severe than type I and is characterized by cyanosis as well as neurological problems, mental deficiency and various other anomalies. Type I has enzyme deficiency (cytochrome B5 reductase) only in the red blood cells whereas in Type II the enzyme deficiency occurs in other body cells as well as red blood cells.
  • Hereditary peripheral nervous disorder: A group of inherited disorders affecting the peripheral nerves (nerves other than the brain and spinal cord). The motor, sensory and/or autonomic nerves may be affected. Examples of such conditions includes Dejerine-Sottas disease and Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.
  • Hunched shoulders: Roundess, hump, or hunching of shoulders
  • Hunching: Hunching or stooping posture symptoms
  • Hyperglycinemia: Increased blood levels of glycine. There are two types of hyperglycinemia (ketotic and nonketotic) with different symptoms.
  • Idiopathic Parkinson's disease: Idiopathic Parkinson's disease is Parkinson's disease for which no particular cause can be determined - it is the most prevalent form of the condition. Parkinson's disease is a chronic, progressive, degenerative brain disorder characterized by tremors, muscle rigidity and slowed movements.
  • Immunoglobulinic amyloidosis: A disease characterized by the abnormal deposit of amyloid in various parts of the body, especially organs such as the kidneys, heart, liver, gastrointestinal tract and peripheral nerves. It occurs when plasma cells in the bone marrow produce too much of a protein portion of an antibody called the light chain. The exact symptoms are determined by the extent of the organ involvement.
  • Impaired position: also known as impaired proprioception is the impaired awareness of the position of the neighbouring parts of the body
  • Infantile spasms: A condition which is characterized by brief muscular spasms in infants
  • Juvenile Paget's Disease:
  • Kernicterus: Kernicterus refers to neurological damage (brain damage) resulting from the passageof bilirubin through the immature blood brain barrier in infants. It can occur in jaundiced infants but not all jaundiced infants will develop kernicterus.
  • Knock-knees: Knock knees refers to a condition of a person's stance in which the knees are angled toward each other and touch but the ankles do not meet.
  • Kyphosis: Increased curvature of the thoracic spine, giving the appearance of being hunched over.
  • Leucinosis: A term used to describe high levels of leucine in the body. It is associated with a metabolic disorder called maple syrup urine disease where there is a deficiency of an enzyme needed to break down leucine so it builds up within the body.
  • Loss of Posture control: in which the muscles of the body cannot support the skeleton in an alignment that is stable and efficient during movement
  • Machado-Joseph Disease: Rare genetic muscle disease causing muscle weakness.
  • Maple syrup urine disease: An inherited metabolic disorder involving amino acid metabolism and characterized by a sweet smelling urine, similar to maple syrup.
  • Maple syrup urine disease, type 1A: A very rare inherited metabolic disorder involving abnormal metabolism of branched chain amino acids (leucine, isoleucine and valine) and resulting in severe illness which generally leads to death if not treated. Even mild form can result in mental and physical retardation if untreated. Various types of maple syrup urine disease involve different genetic defects - type 1A specifically involves a defect in the E1-alpha subunit gene.
  • Maple syrup urine disease, type 1B: A very rare inherited metabolic disorder involving abnormal metabolism of branched chain amino acids (leucine, isoleucine and valine) and resulting in severe illness which generally leads to death if not treated. Even mild form can result in mental and physical retardation if untreated. Various types of maple syrup urine disease involve different genetic defects - type 1B specifically involves a defect in the E1-beta subunit gene.
  • Maple syrup urine disease, type 2:
  • Maple syrup urine disease, type 3:
  • Maple syrup urine disease, type II: A very rare inherited metabolic disorder involving abnormal metabolism of branched chain amino acids (leucine, isoleucine and valine) and resulting in severe illness which generally leads to death if not treated. Even mild form can result in mental and physical retardation if untreated. Various types of maple syrup urine disease involve different genetic defects - type 2 specifically involves a defect in the E2 subunit gene.
  • Maple syrup urine disease, type III: A very rare inherited metabolic disorder involving abnormal metabolism of branched chain amino acids (leucine, isoleucine and valine) and resulting in severe illness which generally leads to death if not treated. Even mild form can result in mental and physical retardation if untreated. Various types of maple syrup urine disease involve different genetic defects - type 3 specifically involves a defect in the E3 subunit gene.
  • Miller-Dieker syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by a smooth brain surface. The condition occurs because of deletion of genetic material from the short arm of chromosome 17 ath a particular location (17p13.3).
  • Mitochondrial Parkinson's disease: A form of Parkinson's disease that seems to be linked to mitochondrial defects - mitochondria are the energy-producing components of body cells. Parkinson's disease is a chronic, progressive, degenerative brain disorder characterized by tremors, muscle rigidity and slowed movements.
  • Mouth symptoms: Symptoms of the mouth or oral area.
  • Movement symptoms: Changes to movement or motor abilities
  • Multiple pterygium syndrome: A very rare disorder characterized by webbing of various parts of the body, contractures, short stature, fusion of neck vertebrae and facial anomalies.
  • Muscle symptoms: Symptoms affecting the muscles of the body
  • Musculoskeletal symptoms: Symptoms affecting muscles or bones of the skeleton.
  • Nerve symptoms: Symptoms affecting the nerves
  • Niemann-Pick disease: A rare inherited biochemical disorder involving the deficiency of an enzyme (acid sphingomyelinase) needed to break down certain lipids which results in an accumulation of these lipids in the body.
  • Non-ketotic hyperglycinemia: A rare disorder of amino acid metabolism where glycine and proline are unable to be metabolized properly due to defects in the glycine cleavage system.
  • Opisthotonos: A condition which is characterized by ones body being at an extreme state of hyperextension
  • Opisthotonus: is a state of extreme hyperextension and spasticity of the head, neck and spinal column
  • Paget's disease of bone: A chronic, slowly progressing bone disorder where the bone is destroyed rapidly and replaced by abnormal bone which is dense and fragile.
  • Parkinson disease 10: A slow progressing form of Parkinson's disease caused by a mutation on chromosome 1p.
  • Parkinson disease 10 (PARK10): Type 10 Parkinson disease is linked to a genetic mutation on chromosome 1p32. Parkinson's disease is a chronic, progressive, degenerative brain disorder characterized by tremors, muscle rigidity and slowed movements.
  • Parkinson disease 11: A form of Parkinson's disease caused by a mutation on chromosome 2q36-q37.
  • Parkinson disease 11 (PARK11): Type 11 Parkinson disease is linked to a genetic mutation on chromosome 2q21.2. Parkinson's disease is a chronic, progressive, degenerative brain disorder characterized by tremors, muscle rigidity and slowed movements.
  • Parkinson disease 12: A X-linked form of Parkinson's disease caused by a mutation on chromosome Xq21-q25.
  • Parkinson disease 12 (PARK12): Type 12 Parkinson disease is linked to a genetic mutation on chromosome Xq21-q25. Parkinson's disease is a chronic, progressive, degenerative brain disorder characterized by tremors, muscle rigidity and slowed movements.
  • Parkinson disease 13: A form of Parkinson's disease caused by a mutation in the serine protease gene on chromosome 2p12.
  • Parkinson disease 13 (PARK13): Type 13 Parkinson disease is linked to a genetic mutation on chromosome 2p12. This form of the condition tends to progress slowly. Parkinson's disease is a chronic, progressive, degenerative brain disorder characterized by tremors, muscle rigidity and slowed movements.
  • Parkinson disease 2, autosomal recessive juvenile (PARK2): Type 2 Parkinson disease is juvenile form of the condition and is linked to a genetic mutation on chromosome 6q25.2-q27. The condition may be inherited in a recessive manner and symptoms tend to be milder following sleep. Parkinson's disease is a chronic, progressive, degenerative brain disorder characterized by tremors, muscle rigidity and slowed movements.
  • Parkinson disease 3, autosomal dominant Lewy body (PARK3): Type 3 Parkinson disease is linked to a genetic mutation on chromosome 2p13. Parkinson's disease is a chronic, progressive, degenerative brain disorder characterized by tremors, muscle rigidity and slowed movements.
  • Parkinson disease 4, autosomal dominant Lewy body (PARK4): Type 4 Parkinson disease is linked to a genetic mutation on chromosome 4q21. This form of the condition tends to start around the age of 45 years and progresses rapidly. Parkinson's disease is a chronic, progressive, degenerative brain disorder characterized by tremors, muscle rigidity and slowed movements.
  • Parkinson disease 4, autosomal dominant, Lewy body: A form of Parkinson's disease caused by a triplication of the alpha-synuclein gene on chromosome 4q21.
  • Parkinson disease 5 (PARK5): Type 5 Parkinson disease is linked to a genetic mutation on chromosome 4p14. Parkinson's disease is a chronic, progressive, degenerative brain disorder characterized by tremors, muscle rigidity and slowed movements.
  • Parkinson disease 6, autosomal recessive early-onset (PARK6): Type 6 Parkinson disease is an early-onset form of the condition and is linked to a genetic mutation on the PINK1 gene on chromosome 1p36. The condition may be inherited in a recessive manner and symptoms tend to fluctuate during the day. Parkinson's disease is a chronic, progressive, degenerative brain disorder characterized by tremors, muscle rigidity and slowed movements.
  • Parkinson disease 6, autosomal recessive, recessive early-onset: A slow progressing form of Parkinson's disease caused by a mutation in the PINK1 gene on chromosome 1p36.
  • Parkinson disease 7, autosomal recessive early-onset (PARK7): Type 7 Parkinson disease is linked to a genetic mutation in the DJ1 gene on chromosome 1p36. This form of the condition tends to start before the age of 40 years and progresses slowly. Parkinson's disease is a chronic, progressive, degenerative brain disorder characterized by tremors, muscle rigidity and slowed movements.
  • Parkinson disease 7, autosomal recessive, early-onset: A recessively inherited form of Parkinson's disease caused by a mutation in the DJ1 gene on chromosome 1p36. Disease progression tends to be slow.
  • Parkinson disease 8: A form of Parkinson's disease caused by a mutation in the dardarin gene on chromosome 12q12.
  • Parkinson disease 8 (PARK8): Type 8 Parkinson disease is linked to a genetic mutation on chromosome 1p32. This form of the condition tends to progress slowly. Parkinson's disease is a chronic, progressive, degenerative brain disorder characterized by tremors, muscle rigidity and slowed movements.
  • Parkinson disease 9 (PARK9): Type 9 Parkinson disease is linked to a mutation in the ATP13A2 gene on chromosome 1p36. This condition progresses rapidly and usually starts during the second decade of life. Dementia, eye movement problems and wasting of the brain tissue occur in addition to the typical symptoms of Parkinson's disease. Parkinson's disease is a chronic, progressive, degenerative brain disorder characterized by tremors, muscle rigidity and slowed movements.
  • Parkinson disease, familial, Type 1: A form of Parkinson's disease involving a mutation in the alpha-synuclein gene on chromosome 4q21.
  • Parkinson disease, familial, type 1 (PARK1): Type 1 familial Parkinson disease is linked to a genetic mutation on chromosome 4q21. Parkinson's disease is a chronic, progressive, degenerative brain disorder characterized by tremors, muscle rigidity and slowed movements.
  • Parkinson disease, genetic types: A type of Parkinson disease that results from a genetic anomaly. There are a more than ten different genes that can cause Parkinson disease.
  • Parkinson's Disease: Degenerative brain condition characterised by tremor.
  • Perinatal hypophosphatasia: An inherited bone disorder due to an inborn error of metabolism characterized by a severe deficiency of alkaline phosphate which results in death before or within days of birth.
  • Pes planus: A collapse of the arch of the foot, leading to a flattening of the feet.
  • Phenothiazine antenatal infection: Maternal use of a drug called phenothiazine has not been proven to cause problems in offspring. Animal studies show there is a risk but no definitive studies have been done on humans. Phenothiazine is used to treat mental and emotional disorders such as schizophrenia. The biggest risks are likely to occur during the first trimester (malformations) and towards the end of the pregnancy (poor muscle tone, poor reflexes and jaundice).
  • Postural hypotension: The occurrence of hypotension which occurs on transfer from lying to standing
  • Primary Parkinsonism: A type of Parkinson disease that results from a genetic anomaly. There are a more than ten different genes that can cause Parkinson disease.
  • Progressive supranuclear palsy, atypical: A rare progressive neurodegenerative disorder which starts involves features of parkinsonism and dementia.
  • Schinzel Giedion Syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by many skeletal and genital anomalies, unusual face, mental retardation and kidney malformations.
  • Schwartz-Jampel Syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by myotonia, blepharophimosis and joint limitation.
  • Severe opisthotonos: is a state of extreme hyperextension and spasticity of the head, neck and spinal column
  • Shy- Drager syndrome: also known as multiple system atrophy
  • Spine symptoms: Symptoms affecting the spine
  • Stiff-Person Syndrome: A very rare progressive neurological disorder involving muscle tightness and painful muscle spasms.
  • Stress: Emotional stress (sometimes refers to physical stress)
  • Sudden onset of loss of posture control: Sudden onset of loss of posture control is a condition in which there is a rapid development of an inability to maintain normal posture.
  • Tay Sachs Disease: A condition which is causes GM2 gangliosidosis
  • Tay-Sachs disease -- juvenile onset: A rare inherited biochemical disorder involving the deficiency of an enzyme called Hexosaminidase A. There are two forms of the disease - juvenile and adult onset.
  • Tetanus: A disease caused by chemicals which are produced by a bacterium (clostridium tetani) and are toxic to the nerves. The infection usually occurs when the bacteria enter the body through a deep wound - these bacteria are anaerobic and hence don't need oxygen to survive.
  • Torsion dystonia 7: A rare inherited movement disorder where the patient suffers involuntary muscle contractions and distortion of body position. Usually the onset of symptoms is focused on one part of the body, usually the neck, eyes or hands.
  • Torsion dystonia with onset in infancy: A rare inherited movement disorder where the patient suffers involuntary muscle contractions and distortion of body position. The disorder occurs during infancy and tends to affect the legs severely and the face and arms to a lesser degree.
  • Variant CJD: New human CJD subtype linked to mad cow disease (BSE).
  • Wolfram's disease: A condition that is inherited and consists of multiple symptoms

Conditions listing medical symptoms: Posture symptoms:

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Conditions listing medical complications: Posture symptoms:

The following list of medical conditions have 'Posture symptoms' or similar listed as a medical complication in our database.

 

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