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Symptoms » Pressure » Glossary
 

Glossary for Pressure

Medical terms related to Pressure or mentioned in this section include:

  • Abdominal swelling: Swelling or bloating of the abdomen
  • Abruptio placentae: A condition which is characterized by the premature detachment of the placenta from the uterus
  • Acute bronchitis: Respiratory inflammation of the bronchi leading to the lungs
  • Adult-onset asthma: Adult-onset asthma is a type of asthma that occurs during adulthood. Asthma involves constriction and inflammation of the airways. The severity of symptoms is variable. Allergies account for about half the cases of adult-onset asthma.
  • Airborne allergy: An airborne allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to airborne allergens such as pollen, mold spores and house dust mites. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Allergic asthma: A form of asthma caused by inhalation of airborne allergenic substance.
  • Angina: Angina is a particular type of pain related to heart conditions
  • Angiofollicular lymph hyperplasia: A rare disorder of the lymph system characterized by the development of benign tumors in lymph tissue anywhere in the body.
  • Aspirin-induced asthma: Aspirin-induced asthma refers to inflammation and constriction of the airways that is triggered by the use of aspirin. A significant number of patients with aspirin-induced asthma also have steroid-dependant asthma where they require regular steroidal asthma medication to maintain normal lung functioning. The severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Asthma: A condition which is characterized by recurrent attacks of paroxysmal dyspnoea
  • Asthma in Adults:
  • Asthma in Children:
  • Asthma in pregnancy: Asthma in pregnancy refers to inflammation and constriction of the airways that is occurs during pregnancy. Women who are pregnancy may decide to stop taking their asthma medication in order to reduce the perceived risk of side effects to the developing fetus. The reality is that the potential harmful effects on the fetus are very small compared to the problems caused to mother and fetus if a severe asthma attack develops. Furthermore, uncontrolled asthma during pregnancy may also cause problems such as small birth weight or premature birth. Pregnant women should consult their physician in order to determine the optimal management of their condition. During pregnancy, asthma symptoms may become worse, improve or stay the same.
  • Asthma, Exercise-Induced: Breathing problems caused by exercise. Patients who suffer from asthma and allergic rhinitis are particularly prone to the condition. Factors such as reduced humidity, cold temperatures, high levels of pollen, poor physical fitness, respiratory infections and reduced air quality can all increase the risk of an attack.
  • Asthma-like conditions: Medical conditions similar to asthma, or having similar symptoms.
  • Asthmatic Bronchitis: A variant of asthma where cough, either chronic or during an exacerbation following a viral infection, is the main or only symptom
  • Atopic asthma: Atopic asthma is one of the most common forms of asthma and is triggered by exposure to an allergen. Upon exposure to the allergen, the airways become constricted and inflamed which affects breathing. The severity of symptoms is variable. This form of asthma is more common in children than adults.
  • Blood pressure symptoms: High (hypertension) or low blood pressure (hypotension).
  • Body symptoms: Symptoms affecting the entire body features.
  • Brain symptoms: Symptoms affecting the brain
  • Breath symptoms: Breath-related symptoms including breath odor
  • Breynia officinalis poisoning: Ingestion of the Breynia officinalis plant can cause irritation to mucosal linings and liver problems. The plant is often used as a herbal drug (Chi R Yun) to treat such things as poor growth, heart failure and venereal disease.
  • Byssinosis: An occupational lung disease caused by an allergic reaction to the components of cotton. Causes symptoms such as coughing, wheezing and shortness of breath.
  • Callistin shellfish poisoning: The Callistin shellfish (Japanese Callista) is found primarily in Japan. Eating the whole shellfish can cause poisoning symptoms in humans. It is believed that the ovaries contain high levels of choline during spawning season which makes them toxic to humans. The symptoms that manifest are similar to a severe allergic reaction. Avoiding eating the ovaries is the best way to prevent poisoning - cooking does not destroy the toxin.
  • Chemical poisoning: Morbid condition caused by chemical.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Acrylonitrile: Acrylonitrile is a chemical used mainly in the production of acrylic and modacrylic fibers but also in the production of certain plastics, nylon dyes, drugs and pesticides. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Ammonia: Ammonia is a chemical used mainly in household cleaning products and bleach. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Azinphos-methyl: Azinphos-methyl is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Bromophos: Bromophos is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Cadmium: Cadmium is a chemical used mainly in batteries, solder, amalgams, cigarettes, PVC pigments and phosphate fertilizer production. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Chlorobenzylidene Malononitrile: Chlorobenzylidene Malononitrile is a chemical used mainly in tear gas. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Demeton-S-methyl: Demeton-S-methyl is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Diazinon: Diazinon is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Diborane: Diborane is a chemical used mainly as a rocket propellant and in the manufacture of rubbers and electronics manufacture. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Dichlorvos: Dichlorvos is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Dicrotophos: Dicrotophos is a toxic insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Dioxathion: Dioxathion is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Disulfoton: Disulfoton is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Ethion: Ethion is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Fensulfothion: Fensulfothion is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and nematicide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Fenthion: Fenthion is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and avicide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Formaldehyde: Formaldehyde is a chemical used mainly in blues, lacquers, fireproofing, electrical insulation, leather tanning products and embalming. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Malathion: Malathion is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Methidathion: Methidathion is a chemical insecticide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Methiocarb: Methiocarb is a toxic pesticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Methomyl: Methomyl is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Parathion: Parathion is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Phosdrin: Phosdrin is a toxic pesticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Profenofos: Profenofos is a toxic pesticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Terbufos: Terbufos is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and nematicide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Tetraethyl Pyrophosphate: Tetraethyl Pyrophosphate is a toxic pesticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chest pressure: Uncomfortable pressure in the chest
  • Chest symptoms: Symptoms affecting the chest region.
  • Chest tightness: The sensation of tightness located in the chest
  • Childhood asthma: Childhood asthma is a type of asthma that occurs during childhood. Asthma involves constriction and inflammation of the airways. The severity of symptoms is variable. The asthma may be triggered by allergens, pollution, viral infections and many other factors.
  • Common symptoms: The most common symptoms
  • Decompression sickness: Condition from overly rapid decompression, especially when diving.
  • Drug-induced asthma: Drug-induced associated asthma refers to inflammation and constriction of the airways that is caused by taking a particular drug. There is a large range of drugs that have the potential to produce asthmatic symptoms in susceptible people. The severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Emotional stress related asthma: Emotional stress related asthma refers to inflammation and constriction of the airways that is caused by emotional stress.
  • Eosinophilic asthma: Eosinophilic asthma is a type of asthma that is characterized by increased levels of eosinophils (a type of white blood cell) in the airways. Asthma involves constriction and inflammation of the airways which makes breathing difficult. The severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Exercise induced asthma: Exercise-induced asthma is a condition of respiratory difficulty that is triggered by aerobic exercise and lasts several minutes. Symptoms of EIA may resemble those of allergic asthma, or they may be much more vague and go unrecognized, resulting in probable underreporting of the disease.
  • Extrinsic asthma: Extrinsic asthma is a type of asthma that is triggered by an exposure to an allergen. Extrinsic asthma involves constriction and inflammation of the airways in response to exposure to the allergen. Examples of possible allergens include dust mites, pollen and mould. The severity of symptoms and allergen involved is variable.
  • Fisher (M.) syndrome: A rare type of nerve disease involving muscle coordination problems, eye muscle paralysis and absent reflexes. It appears to be caused by the body's own immune system destroying the protective layer around nerves. The condition is usually preceded by a viral illness and is not life-threatening.
  • Food Additive Adverse reaction -- MSG: An intolerance to MSG is an adverse reaction (not an immune response) by the body to a food additive called MSG which is used in a number of foods. The adverse reaction results from the body's inability to metabolize or deal with the food additive. The amount of the substance required to trigger the onset of symptoms and the nature and severity of symptoms may vary considerably between patients.
  • Food Additive Adverse reaction -- amines: An intolerance to amines is an adverse reaction (not an immune response) by the body to amines which are found naturally in foods such as bananas, pineapples, vegetables, red wine, citrus fruit and many other foods. The adverse reaction results from the body's inability to metabolize or deal with the substance. The amount of the substance required to trigger the onset of symptoms and the nature and severity of symptoms may vary considerably between patients.
  • Food Additive Adverse reaction -- food additives: An intolerance to food additives is an adverse reaction (not an immune response) by the body to food additives. The adverse reaction results from the body's inability to metabolize or deal with the food additive. The amount of the substance required to trigger the onset of symptoms and the nature and severity of symptoms may vary considerably between patients.
  • Food Additive Adverse reaction -- salicylate: An intolerance to salicylates is an adverse reaction (not an immune response) by the body to salicylates which is an ingredient in aspirin but is also found naturally in various fruit, vegetables, herbs and spices. The adverse reaction results from the body's inability to metabolize or deal with the salicylate. The amount of the substance required to trigger the onset of symptoms and the nature and severity of symptoms may vary considerably between patients.
  • Food Additive Adverse reaction -- sulfite: An intolerance to sulfites is an adverse reaction (not an immune response) by the body to sulfites which is often used as a preservative in a variety of foods and medications including meats, salads and dried fruits. The adverse reaction results from the body's inability to metabolize or deal with the sulfite. The amount of the substance required to trigger the onset of symptoms and the nature and severity of symptoms may vary considerably between patients.
  • Food allergy related asthma: Food allergy related asthma refers to inflammation and constriction of the airways that is caused by an allergic reaction to a particular food. This is a very uncommon cause of asthma.
  • Genital herpes: Sexually transmitted infection of the genital region.
  • Head symptoms: Symptoms affecting the head or brain
  • Heart attack: An acute myocardial infarction
  • House dust allergy: House dust allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to allergens dound in household dust such as pet dander, mold and dust mites. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Hypersensitivity pneumonitis:
  • Infant asthma: Infant asthma is a type of asthma that occurs during childhood. Asthma involves constriction and inflammation of the airways. The severity of symptoms is variable. The asthma may be triggered by allergens, pollution, viral infections and many other factors.
  • Insect bite allergy: An insect bite allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a bite by an insect such as an ant. Multiple bites increase the risk of a severe reaction or death. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Insect sting allergy: An insect sting allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a sting by an insect such as an ant. Multiple stings increase the risk of a severe reaction or death. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Intrinsic asthma: Asthma that is not allergy related.
  • Microvascular angina: A condition which is characterized by angina like chest pain which is caused by microvascular disease
  • Mixed asthma: Mixed asthma is a type of asthma that can be caused by an exposure to an allergen as well as other intrinsic triggers such as exposure to cold air or cigarette smoke. Mixed asthma involves constriction and inflammation of the airways that may or may not involve an allergic reaction.
  • Mixed granulocytic asthma: Mixed granulocytic asthma is a type of asthma that is characterized by increased levels of eosinophils and neutrophils (types of white blood cell) in the airways. Asthma involves constriction and inflammation of the airways which makes breathing difficult. The severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Nerve symptoms: Symptoms affecting the nerves
  • Neurological symptoms: Any symptoms that are caused by neurological conditions
  • Neutrophilic asthma: Neutrophilic asthma is a type of asthma that is characterized by increased levels of neutrophils (a type of white blood cell) in the airways. Asthma involves constriction and inflammation of the airways which makes breathing difficult. The severity of symptoms is variable. This type of asthma is usually driven by such things as pollution and viral infections rather than exposure to an allergen.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- Africanized honeybee: An Africanized honeybee allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to an Africanized honeybee sting. Multiple stings increase the risk of a severe reaction or death. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- Ant: An ant bite allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to an ant bite. Multiple bites increase the risk of a severe reaction or death. Certain ants pose more of an allergy risk than others e.g. red fire ant. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- Black fire ant: A black fire ant bite allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a black fire ant bite. Multiple bites increase the risk of a severe reaction or death. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- Bumblebee: A Bumblebee allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a Bumblebee sting. Multiple stings increase the risk of a severe reaction or death. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- Cockroach: A cockroach allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to cockroaches, in particular their saliva, outer shell, eggs and feces. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- Hornet: A hornet allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a hornet sting. Multiple stings increase the risk of a severe reaction or death. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- Red fire ant: A red fire ant bite allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a red fire ant bite. Multiple bites increase the risk of a severe reaction or death. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- Tropical fire ant: A tropical fire ant bite allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a tropical fire ant bite. Multiple bites increase the risk of a severe reaction or death. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- Yellow jacket Wasp: A yellow jacket allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a yellow jacket wasp sting. Multiple stings increase the risk of a severe reaction or death. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- honey bee: A honey bee allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a honey bee sting. Multiple stings increase the risk of a severe reaction or death. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- scorpion: A scorpion allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a scorpion sting. Multiple stings increase the risk of a severe reaction or death. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- wasp: A wasp allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a wasp sting. Multiple stings increase the risk of a severe reaction or death. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-allergic asthma: Non-allergic asthma is a type of asthma that is not triggered by exposure to an allergen. Non-allergic asthma involves constriction and inflammation of the airways that can be caused by such things as exercise, cold air, cigarette smoke and inhalation of chemicals.
  • Non-atopic asthma: Non-atopic asthma refers to inflammation and constriction of the airways that is not caused by exposure to an allergen. The severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Obesity associated asthma: Obesity associated asthma refers to inflammation and constriction of the airways that is associated with obesity. The severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Beauticians: People employed as beauticians may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to henna extract, ammonium thioglycolate, monoethanolamine, hexamethyhlenamine and persulfate salts. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Boiler Cleaners: People employed as boiler cleaners may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to vanadium and vanadium pentoxide. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Brewery Workers: People employed as brewery workers may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to Choloramine T and sulfone chloramides. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Cement Industry: People employed in the cement industry may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to chromates and dichromates. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Chemical Industry: People employed in the chemical industry may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to trimellitic anhydride, nickel and nickel compounds. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Chemists: People employed as chemists may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to naphthalene diisocyanate. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Cosmetics Industry: People employed in the cosmetics industry may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to carmine. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Detergent Industry: People employed in the detergent industry may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to amylases and proteases. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Dye Industry: People employed in the dye industry may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to carmine. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Electroplating Industry: People employed in the electroplating industry may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to chromium and nickel and chromium and nickel compounds. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Epoxy Resin Industry: People employed in the epoxy resin industry may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to phthalic anhydride, hexahydrophthalic anhydrides, trimellitic anhydride, phthalic anhydride and tetrachlorophthalic anhydride. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Fabric Dying Industry: People employed in the fabric dying industry may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to anthroquinone. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Fire Retardant Industry: People employed in the fire retardant industry may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to himic anhydride. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Foundry Workers: People employed as foundry workers may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to diphenylmethane diisocyanate. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Fur Dying: People employed in the fur dying industry may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to paraphenyl diamine. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Galvanising Industry: People employed in the galvanising industry may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to Zinc. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Hairdressers: People employed as hairdressers may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to ammonium thioglycolate, monoethanolamine, hexamethyhlenamine and persulfate salts. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Hard Metal Industry: People employed in the hard metal industry may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to cobalt. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Hospital staff: People employed as hospital staff may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to enfluorane anaesthetic. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Jewellery Industry: People employed in the jewellery industry may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to platinum, nickel and nickel compounds. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Laminating Industry: People employed in the laminating industry may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to toluene diisocyanate and diphenylmethane diisocyanate. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Laxative Manufacturing: People employed in the laxative manufacturing industry may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to psyllium. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Manufacturing Industry: People employed in the manufacturing industry may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to amylases and proteases. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Medical Sterilisers: People employed as medical sterilisers may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to ethylene oxide. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Nurses: People employed as nurses may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to cephalosporins. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Paint Manufacturing Industry: People employed in the paint manufacturing industry may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to hexamethylene diisocyanate. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Photocopying workers: People employed as photocopying workers may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to diazonium salt. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Polyurethane Foam Industry: People employed in the polyurethane foam industry may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to diphenylmethane diisocyanate. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Polyurethane Industry: People employed in the polyurethane industry may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to toluene diisocyanate. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Refining Industry: People employed in the refining industry may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to platinum. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Rubber Workers: People employed as rubber workers may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to azodicarboamide and ethylene oxide. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Spray Paining Industry: People employed in the spray painting industry may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to hexamethylene diisocyanate. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Tanning Industry: People employed in the tanning industry may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to chromium and chromium compounds. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Turbine Cleaners: People employed as turbine cleaners may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to vanadium and vanadium pentoxide. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Varnish Manufacture Industry: People employed in the varnish manufacture industry may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to toluene diisocyanate. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational asthma: Occupational asthma refers to inflammation and constriction of the airways that occurs in a workplace setting. There is a wide range of chemicals and other airway irritants that are used in a workplace settings and can result in inhalation exposure that can produce asthma symptoms. The severity of symptoms is variable. Occupational exposures can also exacerbate existing asthma symptoms.
  • Occupational asthma -- Anhydride exposure: A respiratory condition caused by exposure to Anhydride in a workplace environment. The severity of symptoms varies between people. Some patients may suffer no symptoms until several exposures or a prolonged period of exposures occurs. Obviously the best way to treat symptoms is to avoid further exposures. People with underlying lung conditions or who smoke face a greater risk of developing occupational asthma.
  • Occupational asthma -- Animal laboratory workers: A respiratory condition that occurs in people who work with animal laboratories and is caused by exposure to animal antigens in the workplace environment. The severity of symptoms varies between people. Some patients may suffer no symptoms until several exposures or a prolonged period of exposures occurs. Obviously the best way to treat symptoms is to avoid further exposures. People with underlying lung conditions or who smoke face a greater risk of developing occupational asthma.
  • Occupational asthma -- Bakers: People employed as Bakers may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to amylases and proteases. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational asthma -- Bookkeepers: A respiratory condition that occurs in bookkeepers and is caused by exposure to paper dust in the workplace environment. The severity of symptoms varies between people. Some patients may suffer no symptoms until several exposures or a prolonged period of exposures occurs. Obviously the best way to treat symptoms is to avoid further exposures. People with underlying lung conditions or who smoke face a greater risk of developing occupational asthma.
  • Occupational asthma -- Carpenters: A respiratory condition that occurs in carpenters and is caused by exposure to wood dust in the workplace environment. The severity of symptoms varies between people. Some patients may suffer no symptoms until several exposures or a prolonged period of exposures occurs. Obviously the best way to treat symptoms is to avoid further exposures. People with underlying lung conditions or who smoke face a greater risk of developing occupational asthma.
  • Occupational asthma -- Fluxes: A respiratory condition that occurs in workers in the electronics industry and caused by exposure to fluxes in the workplace environment. The severity of symptoms varies between people. Some patients may suffer no symptoms until several exposures or a prolonged period of exposures occurs. Obviously the best way to treat symptoms is to avoid further exposures. People with underlying lung conditions or who smoke face a greater risk of developing occupational asthma.
  • Occupational asthma -- Foam producers: A respiratory condition that occurs in foam producers and is caused by exposure to isocyanate in the workplace environment. The severity of symptoms varies between people. Some patients may suffer no symptoms until several exposures or a prolonged period of exposures occurs. Obviously the best way to treat symptoms is to avoid further exposures. People with underlying lung conditions or who smoke face a greater risk of developing occupational asthma.
  • Occupational asthma -- Insulation workers: A respiratory condition that occurs in insulation workers and is caused by exposure to isocyanate in the workplace environment. The severity of symptoms varies between people. Some patients may suffer no symptoms until several exposures or a prolonged period of exposures occurs. Obviously the best way to treat symptoms is to avoid further exposures. People with underlying lung conditions or who smoke face a greater risk of developing occupational asthma.
  • Occupational asthma -- Isocyanate exposure: A respiratory condition caused by exposure to isocyanate in a workplace environment. The severity of symptoms varies between people. Some patients may suffer no symptoms until several exposures or a prolonged period of exposures occurs. Obviously the best way to treat symptoms is to avoid further exposures. People with underlying lung conditions or who smoke face a greater risk of developing occupational asthma.
  • Occupational asthma -- Librarians: A respiratory condition that occurs in librarians and is caused by exposure to paper dust in the workplace environment. The severity of symptoms varies between people. Some patients may suffer no symptoms until several exposures or a prolonged period of exposures occurs. Obviously the best way to treat symptoms is to avoid further exposures. People with underlying lung conditions or who smoke face a greater risk of developing occupational asthma.
  • Occupational asthma -- Metal plating industry: A respiratory condition caused by exposure to metals in a metal plating industry workplace environment. The severity of symptoms varies between people. Some patients may suffer no symptoms until several exposures or a prolonged period of exposures occurs. Obviously the best way to treat symptoms is to avoid further exposures. People with underlying lung conditions or who smoke face a greater risk of developing occupational asthma.
  • Occupational asthma -- Millers: A respiratory condition that occurs in bakers and is caused by exposure to flour in the workplace environment. The severity of symptoms varies between people. Some patients may suffer no symptoms until several exposures or a prolonged period of exposures occurs. Obviously the best way to treat symptoms is to avoid further exposures. People with underlying lung conditions or who smoke face a greater risk of developing occupational asthma.
  • Occupational asthma -- Pharmaceutical industry: People employed in the pharmaceutical industry may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to penicillin, emthyl dopa, spiromycin, salbutamol, tetracycline, piperazine, sulfonamides, cephalosporins and cimetadine. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational asthma -- Plastics industry: People employed in the plastics industry may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to azodicarboamide, trimellitic anhydride, tetrachlorophthalic anhydride and naphthalene diisocyanate. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational asthma -- Post office clerks: A respiratory condition that occurs in post office clerks and is caused by exposure to paper dust in the workplace environment. The severity of symptoms varies between people. Some patients may suffer no symptoms until several exposures or a prolonged period of exposures occurs. Obviously the best way to treat symptoms is to avoid further exposures. People with underlying lung conditions or who smoke face a greater risk of developing occupational asthma.
  • Occupational asthma -- Saw Mill workers: A respiratory condition that occurs in saw mill workers and is caused by exposure to wood dust in the workplace environment. The severity of symptoms varies between people. Some patients may suffer no symptoms until several exposures or a prolonged period of exposures occurs. Obviously the best way to treat symptoms is to avoid further exposures. People with underlying lung conditions or who smoke face a greater risk of developing occupational asthma.
  • Occupational asthma -- Spray Painters: People employed as spray painters may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to dimethyl aminoethanolamine and dimethyl ethanolamine. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational asthma -- Welding industry: People employed in the welding industry may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to chromium and chromium compounds. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational lung disease -- Ammonia inhalation: Inhalation of ammonia in occupational settings can result in lung irritation and other symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure and concentration of the ammonia.
  • Occupational lung disease -- Chlorine inhalation: Inhalation of chlorine in occupational settings can result in lung irritation and other symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure and concentration of the chlorine.
  • Occupational lung disease -- Formalin vapors inhalation: Inhalation of Formalin vapors in occupational settings can result in lung irritation and other symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure and concentration of the Formalin vapors.
  • Occupational lung disease -- Hydrogen Sulfide inhalation: Inhalation of Hydrogen Sulfide in occupational settings can result in lung irritation and other symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure and concentration of the Hydrogen Sulfide.
  • Occupational lung disease -- Nitrogen dioxide inhalation: Inhalation of Nitrogen dioxide in occupational settings can result in lung irritation and other symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure and concentration of the Nitrogen dioxide.
  • Occupational lung disease -- Ozone inhalation: Inhalation of Ozone in occupational settings can result in lung irritation and other symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure and concentration of the Ozone.
  • Occupational lung disease -- Phosgene inhalation: Inhalation of Phosgene in occupational settings can result in lung irritation and other symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure and concentration of the Phosgene.
  • Occupational lung disease -- Sulfur dioxide inhalation: Inhalation of Sulfur dioxide in occupational settings can result in lung irritation and other symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure and concentration of the Sulfur dioxide.
  • Pain: Any type of pain sensation symptoms.
  • Panic attack: A condition which is characterized by an acute episode of intense anxiety
  • Panic disorder: is a severe medical condition characterized by extremely elevated mood
  • Paucigranulocytic asthma: Paucigranulocytic asthma is a type of asthma that is characterized by normal levels of eosinophils and neutrophils (types of white blood cell) in the airways. Asthma involves constriction and inflammation of the airways which makes breathing difficult. The severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Peritonitis: Inflammation of the peritoneum.
  • Plant poisoning -- Amygdalin: Amygdalin is a chemical found naturally in various plants e.g. stone fruit kernels and raw almonds. Eating these parts of the plant that contain the chemical can cause symptoms of cyanide poisoning as the amygdalin is converted to cyanide by the digestive process. Obviously, the concentration of the chemical varies amongst species of plant and often, significant quantities are needed to produce symptoms. Nevertheless, severe poisoning can result in death. Amygdalin is believed by some to inhibit cancers but there has been no conclusive proof of this.
  • Plant poisoning -- Cyanogenic glycoside: Cyanogenic glycoside is a toxin found naturally in various plants e.g. cherries, plums, almonds, peaches, apricots, apples and cassava. The chemical is usually concentrated in the seeds, kernels or wilted leaves. Eating these parts of the plant that contain the chemical can cause symptoms of cyanide poisoning as the cyanogenic glycoside is converted to cyanide by the digestive process. Even chewing the leaves can result in conversion to cyanide due to the presence of digestive enzymes in the mouth. Obviously, the concentration of the chemical varies amongst species of plant and often, significant quantities are needed to produce symptoms. Nevertheless, severe poisoning can result in death.
  • Postoperative respiratory failure: A condition characterised by the inability to use the lungs to perfuse the body with oxygen that occurs following an operation
  • Pressure in Head: Excessive feeling of pressure in the head.
  • Respiratory symptoms: Symptoms affecting the breathing systems.
  • Salicylate-sensitive asthma: Salicylate-sensitive asthma is a type of asthma that is triggered by salicylates which can be found in medications such as aspirin as well as many foods. Asthma involves constriction and inflammation of the airways which makes breathing difficult. The severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Sarcoidosis: Rare autoimmune disease usually affecting the lungs.
  • Seasonal asthma: Seasonal asthma refers to inflammation and constriction of the airways that is triggered by the presence of airborne allergens such as pollen. This type of asthma tends to occur in a seasonal cycle in response to seasonal increases in levels of pollen and other airborne allergens in the air. The severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Sensations: Changes to sensations or the senses
  • Sensory symptoms: Symptoms affecting the sensory systems.
  • Severe, refractory asthma: Severe refractory asthma is a type of asthma that is severe and difficult to treat. Asthma involves constriction and inflammation of the airways which makes breathing difficult.
  • Silent asthma: Silent asthma is a type of asthma that occurs suddenly and is usually severe. The wheezing that usually precipitates and asthma attack is usually absent or very mild. Silent asthma involves rapid constriction and inflammation of the airways which makes breathing difficult.
  • Steroid-dependant asthma: Steroid-dependant asthma refers to inflammation and constriction of the airways that can be managed only through regular use of oral steroids. Excessive use of steroids can lead to side effects so other therapies are often advised e.g. immunoglobulin therapy. The severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Steroid-resistant asthma: Steroid-resistant asthma refers to inflammation and constriction of the airways that does not respond to treatment with steroids. However, higher than normal doses of steroids will alleviate symptoms in most patients but the higher doses carries an increased risk of side effects from steroid use. Other therapies such as immunoglobulin therapy is advised. The severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Steroid-resistant asthma, type I: Steroid-resistant asthma is a type of asthma that doesn't respond to steroid treatment. Steroids work by attaching to a particular part of the T-cells which make up the immune system. In type I, the T-cells have sufficient attachment points for the steroids but they are ineffective. In type II, there are insufficient attachment points for the steroids. Steroid-resistant asthma (like other forms of asthma) involves rapid constriction and inflammation of the airways which makes breathing difficult.
  • Steroid-resistant asthma, type II: Steroid-resistant asthma is a type of asthma that doesn't respond to steroid treatment. Steroids work by attaching to a particular part of the T-cells which make up the immune system. In type I, the T-cells have sufficient attachment points for the steroids but they are ineffective. In type II, there are insufficient attachment points for the steroids which make them less effective or completely ineffective. Steroid-resistant asthma (like other forms of asthma) involves rapid constriction and inflammation of the airways which makes breathing difficult.
  • Steroid-sensitive asthma: Steroid-sensitive asthma refers to inflammation and constriction of the airways that responds well to treatment with steroids. The severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Stiffness: Reduced mobility or movement
  • Stomach cancer: Stomach or gastric cancer can develop in any part of the stomach and may spread throughout the stomach and to other organs
  • Swelling symptoms: Symptoms causing swelling or enlargement.
  • Tako-Tsubo syndrome: Abnormal functioning of the left heart ventricle. It is a heart disease caused by extreme prolonged stress.
  • Tobacco smoke associated asthma: Tobacco smoke associated asthma refers to inflammation and constriction of the airways that is caused by exposure to tobacco smoke. The severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Unstable angina: A condition which is characterized by chest pain of heart origin that occurs without stimuli
  • Virus-induced asthma: Virus-induced asthma refers to inflammation and constriction of the airways that is triggered by a viral respiratory infection. This form of asthma usually has a sudden onset and is relatively severe. Viral respiratory infections can also exacerbate existing asthma symptoms.
  • Vocal cord dysfunction familial: A rare inherited disorder where the vocal cord closes while breathing in which causes breathing difficulty which can be severe in some cases. Mental retardation is also associated.
  • Wolf-Parkinson-White syndrome: Heart arrhythmia causing increased heart rate

Conditions listing medical symptoms: Pressure:

The following list of conditions have 'Pressure' or similar listed as a symptom in our database. This computer-generated list may be inaccurate or incomplete. Always seek prompt professional medical advice about the cause of any symptom.

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