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Glossary for Reduction in arm movement

Medical terms related to Reduction in arm movement or mentioned in this section include:

  • Ankylosing Spondylitis: A form of chronic inflammation of the spine which may also affect joints in the shoulder, hip, neck, ribs and jaw. May result in loss of mobility. Also called Marie-Strumpell disease.
  • Arm conditions: Conditions that affect the arm
  • Arm pain: Pain or discomfort of one or both arms
  • Arm symptoms: Symptoms affecting the arm
  • Brain symptoms: Symptoms affecting the brain
  • Clavicle fracture: clavicle fractures or broken collarbones are one of the most common orthopaedic injuries
  • Fractures: Breakage of bones
  • Frozen shoulder: disorder in which the shoulder capsule, the connective tissue surrounding the glenohumeral joint of the shoulder, becomes inflamed and stiff, and grows together with abnormal bands of tissue, called adhesions, greatly restricting motion and causing chronic pain.
  • Golfer's elbow: Golfer's elbow is also known as medial epicondylitis. It is an inflammatory condition of the elbow which in some ways is similar to tennis elbow.
  • Head symptoms: Symptoms affecting the head or brain
  • Hypophosphatemic rickets: A rare genetic type of rickets involving defective phosphate transport and vitamin D metabolism in the kidneys. Poor calcium absorption from the intestines leads to bone softening.
  • Joint pain: Pain affecting the joints
  • Leg symptoms: Symptoms affecting the leg
  • Limb symptoms: Symptoms affecting the limbs
  • Movement symptoms: Changes to movement or motor abilities
  • Muscle symptoms: Symptoms affecting the muscles of the body
  • Musculoskeletal symptoms: Symptoms affecting muscles or bones of the skeleton.
  • Nerve symptoms: Symptoms affecting the nerves
  • Neurological symptoms: Any symptoms that are caused by neurological conditions
  • Polymyalgia rheumatica: A condition characterized by muscle pain and stiffness, fatigue and fever. It is often associated with giant-cell arteritis which is a related but more serious condition.
  • Reduction in one arm movement: Reduction in one arm movement is a less than normal ability to move the arm.
  • Sensations: Changes to sensations or the senses
  • Shoulder dislocation: Dislocation of the shoulder joint.
  • Shoulder injury: Any injury to the shoulder
  • Shoulder separation: Separation of collarbone (clavicle) and the shoulder blade (scapula).
  • Subacromial bursitis: Inflammation of a pouch of synovial fluid which is located in the shoulder. It is most often caused by some sort of trauma or overuse of the shoulder. It is difficult to distinguish between subacromial bursitis and rotator cuff injury.
  • Sydenham chorea: Brain disease causing involuntary movements or spasms.
  • Syringomyelia: Spinal cord cysts
  • Tennis elbow: Lateral epicondylitis, also known as tennis elbow, is characterized by pain in the back side of the elbow and forearm, along the thumb side when the arm is alongside the body with the thumb turned away.

Conditions listing medical symptoms: Reduction in arm movement:

The following list of conditions have 'Reduction in arm movement' or similar listed as a symptom in our database. This computer-generated list may be inaccurate or incomplete. Always seek prompt professional medical advice about the cause of any symptom.

Select from the following alphabetical view of conditions which include a symptom of Reduction in arm movement or choose View All.

 

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