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Symptoms » Retina symptoms » Glossary
 

Glossary for Retina symptoms

Medical terms related to Retina symptoms or mentioned in this section include:

  • Aase Smith syndrome: A rare hereditary syndrome characterized by deformities such as cleft palate, joint contractures and hypoplastic anemia.
  • Aase Syndrome: A genetic condition which results in anaemia and some skeletal and joint deformities
  • Abetalipoproteinemia: A rare genetic disorder involving fat metabolism. The disorder is also known as Bassen-Kornzweig syndrome. Signs of the disease include acanthocytosis, little or no serum beta-lipoproteins and hypocholesterolemia. In severe cases, steatorrhea, ataxia, nystagmus, motor incoordination and retinitis pigmentosa may also occur.
  • Aceruloplasminemia: A rare genetic disorder characterized by a lack of the protein ceruloplasmin in the blood resulting in a buildup of iron in the liver, brain and pancreas. This in turn causes diabetes and degeneration of the neural system causing tremors and walking abnormalities.
  • Acute diabetes-like retinopathy symptoms: diabetic retinopathy can cause many sudden changes in the retinal pattern such as microaneurysms, cotton-wool spots, flame-shaped hemorrhages and hard exudates
  • Acute retinal necrosis:
  • Acute retinal necrosis syndrome: An acute infection of the eye usually caused by the chicken pox virus (varicella-zoster), herpes simplex or cytomegalovirus. One or both eyes may be involved.
  • Adrenoleukodystrophy: A rare hereditary metabolic disease that only occurs in male children and is characterized by adrenal atrophy and extensive cerebral demyelination causing progressive loss of mental functioning, aphasia, apraxia and sometimes blindness. The patient usually dies within 5 years.
  • Adrenoleukodystrophy, autosomal, neonatal form: A rare inherited disorder involving the adrenal glands, testes and certain parts of the brain (white matter). It is a less severe form of leukodystrophy where an abnormality within the body cells prevents the metabolism of certain fats (long chain fatty acids).
  • Aicardi syndrome: A rare genetic disorder where the structure connecting the two halves of the brain fails to develop which results in seizures and eye abnormalities .
  • Al Gazali -- Nair syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized by bone abnormalities, eye problems, seizures and developmental delay. The reported cases involved related parents.
  • Alezzandrini syndrome: A rare condition involving degenerative eye disease in one eye, followed by other facial symptoms on the same side and hearing impairment. The condition progresses over months or years.
  • Alstrom disease: A rage genetic disorder involving a group of abnormalities affecting vision, hearing, kidney function and also characterized by obesity and diabetes mellitus.
  • Alstrom syndrome: A rare, hereditary genetic disorder which is progressive. Initial symptoms in infants are usually extreme light sensitivity, wobbling of the eyes and sometimes dilated dilated cardiomyopathy and congestive heart failure. Young children quickly gain weight and become obese and as they get older, multiple organ systems may be affected causing blindness, hearing loss, type 2 diabetes, heart failure, liver disease, urological dysfunction, pulmonary fibrosis and renal failure.
  • Alström Syndrome: A progressive condition which is characterized by deafness, obesity and visual problems in childhood that may lead to diabetes and kidney failure in adulthood
  • Anophthalmia -- megalocornea -- cardiopathy -- skeletal anomalies: A rare genetic syndrome characterized by absent or very small eyes, large corneas, congenital heart defects and skeletal abnormalities.
  • Anophthalmos with limb anomalies: A rare disorder characterized by absent eyes
  • Aphakia: Absence of the lens of the eye - often due to cataract treatment. Also called aphacia.
  • Armendares syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by retarded growth and facial, skull and eye abnormalities.
  • Asphyxiating Thoracic Dystrophy: A rare genetic disorder characterized by short limbs, underdeveloped iliac wings and a narrow rigid thoracic cage that often results in asphyxiation.
  • Ataxia -- hypogonadism -- choroidal dystrophy: A very rare disorder characterized by spinocerebellar ataxia, eye abnormalities and a failure of the pituitary to stimulate gonadal development during puberty.
  • Autoimmune uveitis: Autoimmune inflammation of the eye's uvea.
  • Bardet-Biedl Syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by mental retardation, obesity, polydactyly and retinal pigmentation as well as other abnormalities.
  • Bardet-Biedl syndrome, type 1: A rare genetic disorder characterized by mental retardation, obesity, polydactyly and retinal pigmentation as well as other abnormalities. Type 1 is caused by a defect in chromosome 11q13.
  • Bardet-Biedl syndrome, type 10: A rare genetic disorder characterized by mental retardation, obesity, polydactyly and retinal pigmentation as well as other abnormalities. Type 10 is caused by a defect in chromosome 12q.
  • Bardet-Biedl syndrome, type 11: A rare genetic disorder characterized by mental retardation, obesity, polydactyly and retinal pigmentation as well as other abnormalities. Type 11 is caused by a defect in chromosome 9q33.1.
  • Bardet-Biedl syndrome, type 12: A rare genetic disorder characterized by mental retardation, obesity, polydactyly and retinal pigmentation as well as other abnormalities. Type 12 is caused by a defect in chromosome 4q27.
  • Bardet-Biedl syndrome, type 2: A rare genetic disorder characterized by mental retardation, obesity, polydactyly and retinal pigmentation as well as other abnormalities. Type 2 is caused by a defect in chromosome 16q21.
  • Bardet-Biedl syndrome, type 3: A rare genetic disorder characterized by mental retardation, obesity, polydactyly and retinal pigmentation as well as other abnormalities. Type 3 is caused by a defect in chromosome 3p12-q13.
  • Bardet-Biedl syndrome, type 4: A rare genetic disorder characterized by mental retardation, obesity, polydactyly and retinal pigmentation as well as other abnormalities. Type 4 is caused by a defect in chromosome 15q22.3.
  • Bardet-Biedl syndrome, type 5: A rare genetic disorder characterized by mental retardation, obesity, polydactyly and retinal pigmentation as well as other abnormalities. Type 5 is caused by a defect in chromosome 2q31.
  • Bardet-Biedl syndrome, type 6: A rare genetic disorder characterized by mental retardation, obesity, polydactyly and retinal pigmentation as well as other abnormalities. Type 6 is caused by a defect in chromosome 20p12.
  • Bardet-Biedl syndrome, type 7: A rare genetic disorder characterized by mental retardation, obesity, polydactyly and retinal pigmentation as well as other abnormalities. Type 7 is caused by a defect in chromosome 4q27.
  • Bardet-Biedl syndrome, type 8: A rare genetic disorder characterized by mental retardation, obesity, polydactyly and retinal pigmentation as well as other abnormalities. Type 8 is caused by a defect in chromosome 14q32.11.
  • Bardet-Biedl syndrome, type 9: A rare genetic disorder characterized by mental retardation, obesity, polydactyly and retinal pigmentation as well as other abnormalities. Type 9 is caused by a defect in chromosome 7p14.
  • Behcet's Disease: Recurring inflammation of small blood vessels affecting various areas.
  • Behcet's syndrome: Recurring inflammation of small blood vessels affecting various areas.
  • Bessman-Baldwin syndrome: A rare disorder characterized by degeneration of the brain and the macula of the eye.
  • Bestrophinopathy, atuosomal recessive: A disorder of the retinas which manifests as loss of central vision loss.
  • Birdshot retinochoroidopathy syndrome: Inflammation of the middle layer of the eye called the uvea probably caused by an autoimmune process. The rate of progression and degree of vision impairment is variable.
  • Birth symptoms: Symptoms related to childbirth.
  • Blurred vision: Blurriness of vision or images.
  • Bonneman-Meinecke-Reich syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized by calcium deposits in the brain tissue, deficiency of growth hormones and degeneration of the part of the eye called the retina.
  • Bonnemann-Meinecke-Reich syndrome: A rare disorder characterized mainly by growth problems, vision problems and brain disease.
  • Bronchopulmonary dysplasia: A condition which is characterized by dysplasia of the brochopulmonary vessels
  • CAMFAK syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by cataracts, small head, failure to thrive and spinal curvature.
  • CDG syndrome type 1A: A very rare inherited metabolic disorder where defective carbohydrate compounds are attached to glycoproteins and thus impairing glycoprotein function. Type 1A involves a phosphomannomutase enzyme defect and affects most body systems especially the nervous system and liver function.
  • CDG syndrome type I: A rare genetic disorder where the body is unable to synthesize glycoproteins which results in multisystem problems.
  • CRAPB: A rare inherited eye disorder involving slow-progressing chorioretinal damage which leads to vision impairment.
  • Candidiasis: Fungal infection of moist areas such as mouth or vagina
  • Ceroid lipofuscinosis, neuronal 10: A rare metabolic disorder that affects the nerve cells of the body and is characterized by the deposits of lipopigments (lipofuscin). Type 10 involves a deficiency of cathepsin D and involves an initial period of normal development with neurodegenerative symptoms starting during the early school years.
  • Cervenka's syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by joint and facial abnormalities as well as nearsightedness and degenerative eye problems.
  • Chorioretinopathy dominant form -- microcephaly: A rare inherited disorder characterized by a small head, mental retardation and a degenerative eye condition.
  • Choroideremia -- hypopituitarism: A rare inherited disorder characterized by eye disease and hypopituitarism.
  • Chromosome 14q deletion syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder involving deletion of genetic material from the long arm (q) of chromosome 14 resulting in various abnormalities.
  • Chromosome 15q, deletion: A rare chromosomal disorder involving deletion of genetic material from the long arm of chromosome 15.
  • Chromosome 6, trisomy 6q: A rare chromosomal disorder involving duplication of the long arm (q) of chromosome 6 which results in various abnormalities depending on the size and location of the portion of duplicated genetic material.
  • Chromosome 6q duplication syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder involving duplication of the long arm (q) of chromosome 6 which results in various abnormalities depending on the size and location of the portion of duplicated genetic material.
  • Chronic diabetes-like retinopathy symptoms: diabetic retinopathy can cause many changes in the retinal pattern such as microaneurysms, cotton-wool spots, flame-shaped hemorrhages and hard exudates
  • Cmv retinitis:
  • Coats Disease: A rare condition where a small group of dilated blood vessels (telangiectasia) form in the retina of one eye and can result in retinal detachment. It is believed to be a more severe form of Leber military aneurysm.
  • Cocaine fetopathy: Cocaine use during pregnancy resulting in various birth defects and other abnormalities.
  • Cohen-Hayden syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by mental retardation, eye defect and various growth abnormalities of the bone, skin and head.
  • Complex 5 mitochondrial respiratory chain deficiency: A rare genetic defect where an enzyme deficiency (ATP synthetase) disrupts cellular processes. Any of a variety of the components of the enzyme may be missing or defective and hence the clinical presentation and severity may vary. The deficiency may result in a variety of symptoms and conditions of variable severity such as Leber's myopathy, Leigh syndrome, cardiomyopathy and NARP (neuropathy, ataxia, retinitis pigmentosa).
  • Congenital Disorders of Glycosylation: Congenital disorders of glycosylation is a group of disorders involving abnormally synthesis of N-linked oligosaccharides. There is a long chain of events involved in the synthesis and defects may occur with any of the compounds or enzymes involved in the process. Progressive impairment and regression of skills often occurs after a period of normal development following birth.
  • Congenital Disorders of Glycosylation Type Ia: A very rare inherited metabolic disorder where defective carbohydrate compounds are attached to glycoproteins and thus impairing glycoprotein function. Type 1A involves a phosphomannomutase enzyme defect and affects most body systems especially the nervous system and liver function.
  • Congenital X-linked retinoschisis: An inherited eye condition where degenerative changes in the eye causes the retina to split. The severity and age of onset of symptoms can vary.
  • Congenital disorder of glycosylation type 1A: A very rare inherited metabolic disorder where defective carbohydrate compounds are attached to glycoproteins and thus impairing glycoprotein function. Type 1A involves a phosphomannomutase enzyme defect and affects most body systems especially the nervous system and liver function.
  • Constant pain in the eye due to retinal disorders: Constant pain in the eye due to retinal disorders refers to steady eye discomfort related to disorders of the retina of the eye.
  • Cotton wool spots: Opacities in the retina of a white or gray colour.
  • Criswick-Schepens syndrome: A rare progressive eye disorder which can range in severity.
  • Cysticercosis: An infectious disease caused by the pork tapeworm Taenia solium. If the larvae are ingested then a mild or asymptomatic tapeworm infection occurs. However, ingested eggs pass into the bloodstream where they can then enter various tissues and form the cysts that characterize cysticercosis.
  • Cystinosis: A rare biochemical disorder involving the accumulation of a chemical called cystine in various parts of the body which can cause harmful effects.
  • Cytomegalovirus: A easily transmissible viral infection that is common but generally causes no symptoms except in infants and people with weakened immune systems.
  • Cytomegalovirus retinitis: Inflammation of the retina of the eye which can cause blindness. The cytomegalovirus is an easily transmissible viral infection that is common but generally causes no symptoms except in infants and people with weakened immune systems.
  • Degeneration of retina: Degeneration of retina is a deterioration of the retina of the eye.
  • Developmental problems: Physical or mental development difficulty.
  • Diabetes-like retinal edema: It occurs when fluid and protein collects under the retinal layer of the eye usually due to any trauma , infection or detachment of the retina
  • Diabetes-like retinopathy symptoms: diabetic retinopathy can cause many changes in the retinal pattern such as microaneurysms, cotton-wool spots, flame-shaped hemorrhages and hard exudates
  • Diabetes-like symptoms: Symptoms similar to those of diabetes
  • Diabetic retinopathy: A complication of diabetes where the microvasculature of the eye is effected resulting in sight loss
  • Diaphragmatic hernia -- exomphalos -- corpus callosum agenesis: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by a diaphragmatic hernia (defect in the diaphragm that allows some of the abdominal organs to move into the chest cavity), brain development abnormalities and deafness.
  • Dup (1) (q42-qter) & del (18p): A rare chromosomal disorder which manifests as various physical and mental abnormalities. Patients tend to die within the first couple of decades but the condition is poorly defined.
  • Duplication 6q: A rare chromosomal disorder involving duplication of the long arm (q) of chromosome 6 which results in various abnormalities depending on the size and location of the portion of duplicated genetic material.
  • Dwarfism -- deafness -- retinitis pigmentosa: A very rare disorder characterized by deafness, dwarfism and an eye disorder.
  • Dwarfism -- stiff joint -- ocular abnormalities: A very rare form of dwarfism characterized by short stature as well as stiff joints and eye abnormalities.
  • Eales Disease: A rare eye disorder characterized by sudden vision loss, problems with eye blood vessuls and reoccurring eye blood vessel hemorrhages as well as oozing of clear thick fluid from inside the eyeball. Usually occurs after a stressful situation, trauma or after waking up.
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type VI: A rare genetic connective tissue disorder characterized by lax joints, scoliosis and fragile sclera of the eye - Ehlers Danlos type with predominant ocular abnormalities.
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, 6B: A rare genetic connective tissue disorder characterized by lax joints, scoliosis and fragile sclera of the eye - Ehlers Danlos type with predominant ocular abnormalities but lysyl-hydroxylase activity is normal1.
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, classic type: A rare genetic connective tissue disorder characterized by hypermobile joints, joint dislocations and skin hyperextensibility and fragility - a combination of ED types I and II.
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, kyphoscoliosis type: A rare genetic connective tissue disorder caused by deficiency of the lysyl hydroxylase enzyme and is characterized by progressive scoliosis and muscle weakness and fragile sclera - previously known as EDS type 6.
  • Electrical burns: Burns caused when an electric current pass through the body or part of it. The symptoms and severity of the burn depends on the strength of the electrical current, the duration of the exposure and the part of the body involved. Prompt treatment in more severe cases can improve the prognosis.
  • Encephalopathy -- intracranial calcification -- growth hormone deficiency -- microcephaly -- retinal degeneration: A rare condition characterized mainly by brain disease, poor growth due to a deficiency of growth hormone, a small head and vision impairment.
  • Exudative retinopathy familial, X-linked, recessive: A rare progressive eye disorder which is inherited in a recessive X-linked manner. The development of the retinal blood vessels is incomplete resulting in parts of the retina having no blood vessels which is necessary for it's function. The disorder is caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 11q14-q21 and the severity of the condition.
  • Exudative retinopathy familial, autosomal dominant: A rare progressive eye disorder which is inherited in a dominant manner. The development of the retinal blood vessels is incomplete resulting in parts of the retina having no blood vessels which is necessary for it's function. The disorder is caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 11q14-q21 and the severity of the condition is variable.
  • Exudative retinopathy familial, autosomal recessive: A rare progressive eye disorder which is inherited in a recessive manner. The development of the retinal blood vessels is incomplete resulting in parts of the retina having no blood vessels which is necessary for it's function.
  • Exudative retinopathy, familial: A rare progressive eye disorder which is inherited in a familial manner. The development of the retinal blood vessels is incomplete resulting in parts of the retina having no blood vessels which is necessary for it's function.
  • Exudative retinoschisis:
  • Exudative vitreoretinopathy 3: A rare progressive eye disorder caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 11p13-p12. The development of the retinal blood vessels is incomplete resulting in parts of the retina having no blood vessels which is necessary for it's function.
  • Exudative vitreoretinopathy 4: A rare progressive eye disorder caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 11q13.4. It can be inherited in a dominant or recessive manner. The development of the retinal blood vessels is incomplete resulting in parts of the retina having no blood vessels which is necessary for it's function.
  • Eye symptoms: Symptoms affecting the eye
  • Face symptoms: Symptoms affecting the face
  • Faciooculoacousticorenal syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized by facial, eye, ear and kidney abnormalities.
  • Familial Granulomatosis, Blau type: A rare chronic inflammatory condition characterized by arthritis, dermatitis and uveitis. The condition may have a similar presentation to a condition called early-onset sarcoidosis and genetic testing may be needed to distinguish the conditions.
  • Familial, Systemic, Juvenile Granulomatosis: A rare chronic inflammatory condition characterized by arthritis, dermatitis and uveitis. The condition may have a similar presentation to a condition called early-onset sarcoidosis and genetic testing may be needed to distinguish the conditions.
  • Flashes: Seeing small flashes of light
  • Floaters: Floating spots or spidery webs in front of the eyes
  • Furukawa-Takagi-Nakao syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized by muscle weakness and wasting, ataxia, diabetes and eye problems.
  • Gestational hypertension: Hypertension that occurs to a mother during pregnancy
  • Granulomatous arthritis of childhood: A rare chronic inflammatory condition that starts during early childhood and is characterized by arthritic joints, uveitis and a skin rash that forms on the trunk and limbs.
  • HARD syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by a smooth brain surface and eye, genitourinary and other abnormalities.
  • HARD syndrome (Hydrocephalus -- agyria -- retinal dysplasia): A rare genetic disorder characterized by a smooth brain surface and eye, genitourinary and other abnormalities.
  • HERNS syndrome: A rare inherited syndrome characterized by blood vessel disease which causes eye and kidney disease and strokes. Neurological manifestations tend to occur around the 2nd and 3rd decade of life due to the blood vessels in the brain being affected.
  • Hantavirosis: Infection by hantavirus which is a virus from the family Bunyaviridae. Infection generally causes severe febrile illness which can involve bleeding, shock and even death in some cases. The disease is transmitted by infected rodents.
  • Hardikar syndrome: A very rare disorder characterized by obstructive liver disease, cleft lip, cleft palate, eye and urogenital abnormalities.
  • Head symptoms: Symptoms affecting the head or brain
  • Helminth infections: The infection by a parasitic worm
  • Hemiplegic migraine, familial: A rare inherited form of migraine that characteristically causes temporary paralysis on one side of the body.
  • Hemoglobin SC: A genetic blood disorder where the patient inherits a gene for hemoglobin S from one parent and hemoglobin C from another. Severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Hereditary vascular retinopathie -- Raynaud phenomenon -- migraine: An inherited disorder characterized by a disease of the small retinal blood vessels, migrains and Raynaud's phenomenon.
  • Hersh-Podruch-Weisskopk syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by progressive retinal damage, mental retardation and deafness.
  • High Blood Pressure/Hypertension:
  • High blood pressure: Excessive blood pressure.
  • Homocarnosinosis: A very rare metabolic disorder where a deficiency of homocarnosinase causes a harmful buildup of homcarnosine. Symptoms include mental retardation, retinal pigmentation and spastic diplegia.
  • Homozygous hypobetalipoproteinemia: Inherited low blood betalipoprotein level. The type and severity of symptoms is determined by whether or not there are some betalipoproteins in the body.
  • Hurler syndrome:
  • Hyperoxia: A high level of oxygen in body tissues. It can be caused by exposure to high atmospheric pressure or long term inhalation of high oxygen concentrations. The high levels of oxygen may affect the lungs, nervous system or the eyes and thus can result in varying symptoms.
  • Hypertension: Excessive blood pressure.
  • Hypertrichosis retinopathy dysmorphism: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by the association of excessive hair, retinopathy and dysmorphism.
  • Hypobetalipoproteinaemia -- ataxia -- hearing loss: A rare disorder characterized by the association of low blood betalipoprotein level, ataxia and hearing loss.
  • Hypobetalipoproteinemia: A medical term for low levels of apolipoprotein (LDL cholesterol) in the blood.
  • Hypobetalipoproteinemia, familial: An genetic lipid metabolism disorder characterized by low betalipoprotein levels in blood. The disorder tends to run in families (familial). The severity of the condition is determined by whether the genetic defect is inherited from one or both parents.
  • Hypotrichosis, syndactyly and retinal degeneration: A rare syndrome characterized by reduced hair, syndactyly and retinal degeneration. The hand and finger anomalies are variable.
  • Impaired vision: Reduced or degraded vision.
  • Incontinentia Pigmenti: A rare genetic skin pigmentation disorder characterized by eye, teeth, bone, nail and hair malformations as well as central nervous abnormalities and mental deficiency.
  • Infantile Refsum Disease: Genetic disease affecting nerve and muscle control.
  • Inflammation of the retina: inflammation of the retina due to following causes.
  • Intermittent diabetes-like retinopathy symptoms: diabetic retinopathy can cause many changes in the retinal pattern such as microaneurysms, cotton-wool spots, flame-shaped hemorrhages and hard exudates
  • Intraocular melanoma: A type of cancer that develops from pigment producing cells in the eye. The cancer can occur in the iris, choroids or ciliary body. The melanoma may metastasize in some cases. The condition is often asymptomatic.
  • Jeune syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by short limbs, underdeveloped iliac wings and a narrow rigid thoracic cage that often results in asphyxiation.
  • Joubert Syndrome 9: Joubert syndrome is a rare congenital neurological disorder characterized mainly by a brain anomaly where the cerebellar vermis is underdeveloped. This part of the brain is responsible to for balance and coordination. Most of the symptoms are of a neurological type. There are ten subtypes of the disorder, each with a different origin for the genetic anomaly. Type 9 is linked to a defect on chromosome 4p15.3.
  • Juvenile Retinoschisis: An inherited eye condition where degenerative changes in the eye causes the retina to split. The severity and age of onset of symptoms can vary.
  • Kearns-Sayre Syndrome: A rare neuromuscular disorder characterized by pigmented deposits on the retina, heart disease and progressive paralysis of some eye muscles.
  • Kniest dysplasia: A rare genetic bone growth disorder characterized by dwarfism, enlarged joints and facial deformities.
  • Knobloch syndrome: A rare genetic syndrome characterized by detachment of the retina of the eye and an occipital encephalocele (protrusion of brain tissue through gap in skull at the back of the head).
  • Leukocoria in children:
  • Lujan-Fryns syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by mental retardation and marfanoid habitus (features of Marfan's syndrome).
  • MODY syndrome: A dominantly inherited form of type II diabetes that occurs in young people (less than 25 years old) and is not insulin-dependent. The diabetes results due to genetic mutations which leads to dysfunctional insulin-producing pancreatic cells. There are 6 different genetic mutations that can cause this type of diabetes.
  • MODY syndrome, type III: A dominantly inherited form of type II diabetes that occurs in young people (less than 25 years old) and is not insulin-dependent. MODY type 3 is due to a mutation of the hepatic transcriptor factor-1 gene on chromosome 12q24.2. The hyperglycemia in this form of the condition tends to increase with time and hence eventually requires treatment in the form of medication in many patients.
  • MORM syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by mental retardation, truncal obesity, small penis and an eye disorder.
  • Marfan syndrome: A genetic connective tissue disorder involving a defect of chromosome 15q21.1 which affects the production of the fibrillin needed to make connective tissue.
  • Marfan-Like syndrome: Any congenital condition with a group of symptoms that resembles Marfan syndrome but doesn't quite fulfill all the criteria. Marfan syndrome is a connective tissue disorder that affects the skeleton, lungs, eyes, heart and blood vessels.
  • Melanoma of the choroid: A type of eye cancer that occurs in the pigment-producing cells of the choroid which is a layer beneath the retina consisting mainly of blood vessels.
  • Methylmalonic acidemia -- homocystinuria: A rare inborn error of metabolism which results in impaired vitamin B12 metabolism. There are a number of forms of this condition with variable severity.
  • Microphthalmia syndromic, type 5: A rare inherited syndrome characterized by small eyes and various other abnormalities. The symptoms are variable to some degree.
  • Microspherophakia with hernia: A rare disorder characterized by myopia, detached retina, inguinal hernia and small, spherical, upward dislocated eye lens.
  • Midline craniofacial anomalies and morning glory disc anomaly: A rare syndrome involving the association of midline skull and facial defects and morning glory disc anomaly - a rare birth defect of the optic papilla which is the part of the eye where the optic nerve emerges. The eye defect usually only affects one eye. The features are variable to some degree.
  • Mild diabetes-like retinopathy symptoms: diabetic retinopathy can cause many changes in the retinal pattern such as microaneurysms, cotton-wool spots, flame-shaped hemorrhages and hard exudates
  • Mitochondrial diseases, clinically indefinite: An inherited biochemical disorder which can affect many body systems such as the skeleton, heart, brain and nervous system.
  • Mucolipidosis IV: A condition which is characterized by the accumulation of both glycoaminoglycans and lipids in tissues
  • Mucolipidosis type 4: A rare inherited biochemical disorder involving the harmful accumulation of certain chemicals (ganglioside and mucopolysaccharide) in body tissues due to the deficiency of an enzyme needed to process it.
  • Mucopolysaccharidoses: A lysosomal storage disorder that is caused by a deficiency of the ability to metabolise glycosaminoglycans
  • Mucopolysaccharidosis type I Hurler syndrome: A rare inherited biochemical disorder characterized by the accumulation of mucopolysaccharides (glycosaminoglycans) in various body tissues due to insufficient amounts of the enzyme (?-L-diuronidase) needed to break it down. There are three main sub-types of the disorder: Hurler - severe form, Scheie - mild form and Hurler/Scheie form which is intermediate.
  • Mucopolysaccharidosis type I Scheie syndrome: A rare inherited biochemical disorder characterized by the accumulation of mucopolysaccharides (glycosaminoglycans) in various body tissues due to insufficient amounts of the enzyme (?-L-iduronidase) needed to break it down.
  • Muscle-eye-brain syndrome: A genetic disease characterized by muscle weakness, congenital brain abnormalities and eye problems as well as other defects.
  • Myopia 1: Myopia is an eye disorder characterized by the ability to see close objects clearly but distant objects appear blurry. It is also known as shortsightedness or nearsightedness and the underlying process involved is an a refractive error. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility of developing myopia. Having this genetic anomaly does not mean a person will definitely develop myopia but their chances are increased, especially if certain triggering factors are also present e.g. visual stress due to close work (computers, reading). Type 1 is linked to a gene on chromosome Xq28.
  • Myopia 10: Myopia is an eye disorder characterized by the ability to see close objects clearly but distant objects appear blurry. It is also known as shortsightedness or nearsightedness and the underlying process involved is an a refractive error. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility of developing myopia. Having this genetic anomaly does not mean a person will definitely develop myopia but their chances are increased, especially if certain triggering factors are also present e.g. visual stress due to close work (computers, reading). Type 10 is linked to a gene on chromosome 8p23.
  • Myopia 11: Myopia is an eye disorder characterized by the ability to see close objects clearly but distant objects appear blurry. It is also known as shortsightedness or nearsightedness and the underlying process involved is an a refractive error. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility of developing myopia. Having this genetic anomaly does not mean a person will definitely develop myopia but their chances are increased, especially if certain triggering factors are also present e.g. visual stress due to close work (computers, reading). Type 11 is linked to a gene on chromosome 4q22-q27.
  • Myopia 12: Myopia is an eye disorder characterized by the ability to see close objects clearly but distant objects appear blurry. It is also known as shortsightedness or nearsightedness and the underlying process involved is an a refractive error. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility of developing myopia. Having this genetic anomaly does not mean a person will definitely develop myopia but their chances are increased, especially if certain triggering factors are also present e.g. visual stress due to close work (computers, reading). Type 12 is linked to a gene on chromosome 2q37.1.
  • Myopia 13: Myopia is an eye disorder characterized by the ability to see close objects clearly but distant objects appear blurry. It is also known as shortsightedness or nearsightedness and the underlying process involved is an a refractive error. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility of developing myopia. Having this genetic anomaly does not mean a person will definitely develop myopia but their chances are increased, especially if certain triggering factors are also present e.g. visual stress due to close work (computers, reading). Type 13 is linked to a gene on chromosome Xq23-q25.
  • Myopia 14: Myopia is an eye disorder characterized by the ability to see close objects clearly but distant objects appear blurry. It is also known as shortsightedness or nearsightedness and the underlying process involved is an a refractive error. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility of developing myopia. Having this genetic anomaly does not mean a person will definitely develop myopia but their chances are increased, especially if certain triggering factors are also present e.g. visual stress due to close work (computers, reading). Type 14 is linked to a gene on chromosome 1p36.
  • Myopia 15: Myopia is an eye disorder characterized by the ability to see close objects clearly but distant objects appear blurry. It is also known as shortsightedness or nearsightedness and the underlying process involved is an a refractive error. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility of developing myopia. Having this genetic anomaly does not mean a person will definitely develop myopia but their chances are increased, especially if certain triggering factors are also present e.g. visual stress due to close work (computers, reading). Type 15 is linked to a gene on chromosome 10q21.1.
  • Myopia 16: Myopia is an eye disorder characterized by the ability to see close objects clearly but distant objects appear blurry. It is also known as shortsightedness or nearsightedness and the underlying process involved is an a refractive error. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility of developing myopia. Having this genetic anomaly does not mean a person will definitely develop myopia but their chances are increased, especially if certain triggering factors are also present e.g. visual stress due to close work (computers, reading). Type 16 is linked to a gene on chromosome 5p15.
  • Myopia 2: Myopia is an eye disorder characterized by the ability to see close objects clearly but distant objects appear blurry. It is also known as shortsightedness or nearsightedness and the underlying process involved is an a refractive error. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility of developing myopia. Having this genetic anomaly does not mean a person will definitely develop myopia but their chances are increased, especially if certain triggering factors are also present e.g. visual stress due to close work (computers, reading). Type 2 is linked to a gene on chromosome 18p11.31.
  • Myopia 3: Myopia is an eye disorder characterized by the ability to see close objects clearly but distant objects appear blurry. It is also known as shortsightedness or nearsightedness and the underlying process involved is an a refractive error. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility of developing myopia. Having this genetic anomaly does not mean a person will definitely develop myopia but their chances are increased, especially if certain triggering factors are also present e.g. visual stress due to close work (computers, reading). Type 3 is linked to a gene on chromosome 12q.
  • Myopia 4: Myopia is an eye disorder characterized by the ability to see close objects clearly but distant objects appear blurry. It is also known as shortsightedness or nearsightedness and the underlying process involved is an a refractive error. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility of developing myopia. Having this genetic anomaly does not mean a person will definitely develop myopia but their chances are increased, especially if certain triggering factors are also present e.g. visual stress due to close work (computers, reading). Type 4 is linked to a gene on chromosome 7p15.
  • Myopia 5: Myopia is an eye disorder characterized by the ability to see close objects clearly but distant objects appear blurry. It is also known as shortsightedness or nearsightedness and the underlying process involved is an a refractive error. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility of developing myopia. Having this genetic anomaly does not mean a person will definitely develop myopia but their chances are increased, especially if certain triggering factors are also present e.g. visual stress due to close work (computers, reading). Type 5 is linked to a gene on chromosome 17q.
  • Myopia 6: Myopia is an eye disorder characterized by the ability to see close objects clearly but distant objects appear blurry. It is also known as shortsightedness or nearsightedness and the underlying process involved is an a refractive error. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility of developing myopia. Having this genetic anomaly does not mean a person will definitely develop myopia but their chances are increased, especially if certain triggering factors are also present e.g. visual stress due to close work (computers, reading). Type 6 is linked to a gene on chromosome 22q12.
  • Myopia 7: Myopia is an eye disorder characterized by the ability to see close objects clearly but distant objects appear blurry. It is also known as shortsightedness or nearsightedness and the underlying process involved is an a refractive error. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility of developing myopia. Having this genetic anomaly does not mean a person will definitely develop myopia but their chances are increased, especially if certain triggering factors are also present e.g. visual stress due to close work (computers, reading). Type 7 is linked to a gene on chromosome 11p13.
  • Myopia 8: Myopia is an eye disorder characterized by the ability to see close objects clearly but distant objects appear blurry. It is also known as shortsightedness or nearsightedness and the underlying process involved is an a refractive error. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility of developing myopia. Having this genetic anomaly does not mean a person will definitely develop myopia but their chances are increased, especially if certain triggering factors are also present e.g. visual stress due to close work (computers, reading). Type 8 is linked to a gene on chromosome 3q26.
  • Myopia 9: Myopia is an eye disorder characterized by the ability to see close objects clearly but distant objects appear blurry. It is also known as shortsightedness or nearsightedness and the underlying process involved is an a refractive error. Researchers have discovered a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility of developing myopia. Having this genetic anomaly does not mean a person will definitely develop myopia but their chances are increased, especially if certain triggering factors are also present e.g. visual stress due to close work (computers, reading). Type 9 is linked to a gene on chromosome 4q12.
  • Neonatal ALD: Progressive form of ALD in newborns.
  • Nerve symptoms: Symptoms affecting the nerves
  • Neuropathy -- ataxia -- retinitis pigmentosa: A rare inherited disorder where defects in the energy producing part of cells affects the nervous system and causes symptoms such as muscle and vision problems. Severity and rang of symptoms are variable.
  • Neuropathy ataxia and retinis pigmentosa: A rare inherited disorder where defects in the energy producing part of cells affects the nervous system and causes symptoms such as muscle and vision problems. Severity and rang of symptoms are variable.
  • Noble-Bass-Sherman syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized by various eye anomalies.
  • Norrie Disease: A rare form of blindness that occurs at birth or soon after due to eye defects. The severity and range of symptoms is variable.
  • Norrie syndrome: A rare form of blindness that occurs at birth or soon after due to eye defects. The severity and range of symptoms is variable.
  • Oculo tricho dysplasia: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by eye, tooth and hair abnormalities
  • Olivopontocerebellar atrophy type 3: A disorder where degeneration of certain parts of the brain and spinal cord results in symptoms such as blindness, tremor, speech problems and ataxia.
  • Osteochondrodysplatic dwarfism -- deafness -- retinitis pigmentosa: A rare syndrome characterized by extreme dwarfism, deafness, progressive scoliosis and retinal pigment anomalies.
  • Osteopetrosis, autosomal recessive 4: A rare disorder characterized primarily by increased bone density as old bone is not resorbed and replaced with new bone - is also known as marble bone disease. The malignant infantile form is the most severe form of this disorder and death usually occurs in the first decade of life.
  • Pediatric granulomatous arthritis: A rare chronic inflammatory condition that starts during early childhood and is characterized by arthritic joints, uveitis and a skin rash that forms on the trunk and limbs.
  • Pigmentary retinopathy: An inherited eye disorder involving degeneration of the retina.
  • Pigmented retina: Abnormal colouring of the retina.
  • Polyneuropathy, Hearing Loss, Ataxia, Retinitis Pigmentosa and Cataract: A very rare, recessively inherited condition characterized by the association of vision, hearing and neurological problems. The condition generally starts during the second decade of life and progresses slowly.
  • Pork tapeworm: A tapeworm infection that is caused from pork
  • Posterior vitreous detachment: Detachment of the eye's internal jelly vitreous from the rear of the eye
  • Progressive Rubella Panencephalitis: A very rare complication of rubella infection where neurological symptoms develop following a congenital rubella infection and very rarely with childhood rubella. It is believed that the condition is the result of persistent rubella virus infection.
  • Protein S acquired deficiency: A rare disorder involving a deficiency of a blood protein called protein S. Protein S prevents blood from clotting in the veins. A deficiency of protein S can be acquired through liver disease, chemotherapy, lack of vitamin K or through the use of oral anticoagulants or L-asparaginase.
  • Proteus like syndrome mental retardation eye defect: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by mental retardation, eye defect and various growth abnormalities of the bone, skin and head.
  • Pseudoadrenoleukodystrophy: A rare disorder where an enzyme deficiency (Acyl-CoA Oxidase) results in symptoms such as seizures, apnea, delayed psychomotor retardation and neurological deterioration.
  • Pulmonary edema of mountaineers: A severe complication of mountain sickness resulting from a lack of oxygen at high altitudes.
  • Punctate inner choroidopathy: A very rare inflammatory eye disorder that tends to occur in nearsighted patients.
  • RHYNS syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by eye, kidney and skeletal abnormalities as well as hypopituitarism.
  • Recurring diabetes-like retinopathy symptoms: diabetic retinopathy can cause many recurring changes in the retinal pattern such as microaneurysms, cotton-wool spots, flame-shaped hemorrhages and hard exudates
  • Refsum Disease: A metabolic disorder where a deficiency of phytanic acid alpha-hydroxylase results in a buildup of phytanic acid in the body which causes neurological disorders.
  • Refsum disease, infantile form: A rare inherited biochemical disorder characterized by normal development initially followed by degeneration, facial anomalies and enlarged liver.
  • Retina Conditions: Any condition that affects the retina of the eye
  • Retina inflammation: Inflammation of the retina.
  • Retina sensitive: Raised responsiveness of the retina to stimulus.
  • Retinal blister: Small raised lesions in the eye less than 0.5mm in diameter.
  • Retinal burning sensation: Abnormal sensations in the retina due to inflammation.
  • Retinal degeneration: Degeneration which occurs to the retina of the eye
  • Retinal detachment: Detachment of the retina of the eye
  • Retinal dystrophy: Retinal dystrophy refers to a degeneration of the retina, specialized tissue in the back of the eye that transforms light into visual impulses, which travels to the brain through the optic nerve.
  • Retinal edema: It occurs when fluid and protein collects under the retinal layer of the eye.
  • Retinal edema in both eyes: Retinal edema in both eyes refers to swelling of a structure located in the back of both eyes called the retina, especially the central retina or macula.
  • Retinal edema in one eye: Retinal edema in one eye refers to a condition in which there is swelling of a structure in the back of one eye called the retina, especially the central retina or macula.
  • Retinal hemorrhage in children: Retinal hemorrhage in children refers to a child who has bleeding or hemorrhage of the blood vessels in the retina, specialized tissue in the back of the eye that transforms light into visual impulses, which travels to the brain through the optic nerve.
  • Retinal itch: Unpleasant sensation felt in the retina.
  • Retinal scarring of both eyes: Retinal scarring of both eyes is a condition in which there is scar formation in both retinas, specialized tissue in the back of the eyes that transform light into visual impulses, which travels to the brain through the optic nerve.
  • Retinal scarring of one eye: Retinal scarring of one eye refers to scar formation in one retina, specialized tissue in the back of the eye that transforms light into visual impulses, which travels to the brain through the optic nerve.
  • Retinis pigmentosa -- deafness -- hypogenitalism: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by progressive retinal damage, deafness and genital anomalies.
  • Retinitis Pigmentosa 10: Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disorder characterized by progressive loss of peripheral vision and night vision difficulties that can cause central vision loss. There are a large number of genes linked to retinitis pigmentosa. Type 10 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 7q31.3-q32.
  • Retinitis Pigmentosa 11: Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disorder characterized by progressive loss of peripheral vision and night vision difficulties that can cause central vision loss. There are a large number of genes linked to retinitis pigmentosa. Type 11 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 19q13.4.
  • Retinitis Pigmentosa 12: Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disorder characterized by progressive loss of peripheral vision and night vision difficulties that can cause central vision loss. There are a large number of genes linked to retinitis pigmentosa. Type 12 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 1q31-q32.1.
  • Retinitis Pigmentosa 13: Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disorder characterized by progressive loss of peripheral vision and night vision difficulties that can cause central vision loss. There are a large number of genes linked to retinitis pigmentosa. Type 13 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 17p13.3.
  • Retinitis Pigmentosa 14: Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disorder characterized by progressive loss of peripheral vision and night vision difficulties that can cause central vision loss. There are a large number of genes linked to retinitis pigmentosa. Type 14 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 6p21.3.
  • Retinitis Pigmentosa 17: Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disorder characterized by progressive loss of peripheral vision and night vision difficulties that can cause central vision loss. There are a large number of genes linked to retinitis pigmentosa. Type 17 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 17q23.
  • Retinitis Pigmentosa 18: Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disorder characterized by progressive loss of peripheral vision and night vision difficulties that can cause central vision loss. There are a large number of genes linked to retinitis pigmentosa. Type 18 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 1q21.2.
  • Retinitis Pigmentosa 19: Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disorder characterized by progressive loss of peripheral vision and night vision difficulties that can cause central vision loss. There are a large number of genes linked to retinitis pigmentosa. Type 19 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 1p21-p13.
  • Retinitis Pigmentosa 2: Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disorder characterized by progressive loss of peripheral vision and night vision difficulties that can cause central vision loss. There are a large number of genes linked to retinitis pigmentosa. Type 2 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome Xp11.3.
  • Retinitis Pigmentosa 20: Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disorder characterized by progressive loss of peripheral vision and night vision difficulties that can cause central vision loss. There are a large number of genes linked to retinitis pigmentosa. Type 20 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 1p31.
  • Retinitis Pigmentosa 22: Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disorder characterized by progressive loss of peripheral vision and night vision difficulties that can cause central vision loss. There are a large number of genes linked to retinitis pigmentosa. Type 22 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 16p12.3-p12.1.
  • Retinitis Pigmentosa 23: Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disorder characterized by progressive loss of peripheral vision and night vision difficulties that can cause central vision loss. There are a large number of genes linked to retinitis pigmentosa. Type 23 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome Xp22.
  • Retinitis Pigmentosa 24: Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disorder characterized by progressive loss of peripheral vision and night vision difficulties that can cause central vision loss. There are a large number of genes linked to retinitis pigmentosa. Type 24 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome Xq26-q27.
  • Retinitis Pigmentosa 25: Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disorder characterized by progressive loss of peripheral vision and night vision difficulties that can cause central vision loss. There are a large number of genes linked to retinitis pigmentosa. Type 25 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 6q12.
  • Retinitis Pigmentosa 26: Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disorder characterized by progressive loss of peripheral vision and night vision difficulties that can cause central vision loss. There are a large number of genes linked to retinitis pigmentosa. Type 26 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 2q31.2-q32.3.
  • Retinitis Pigmentosa 28: Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disorder characterized by progressive loss of peripheral vision and night vision difficulties that can cause central vision loss. There are a large number of genes linked to retinitis pigmentosa. Type 28 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 2p15-p11.
  • Retinitis Pigmentosa 30: Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disorder characterized by progressive loss of peripheral vision and night vision difficulties that can cause central vision loss. There are a large number of genes linked to retinitis pigmentosa. Type 30 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 17q25.
  • Retinitis Pigmentosa 31: Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disorder characterized by progressive loss of peripheral vision and night vision difficulties that can cause central vision loss. There are a large number of genes linked to retinitis pigmentosa. Type 31 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 9p21.
  • Retinitis Pigmentosa 32: Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disorder characterized by progressive loss of peripheral vision and night vision difficulties that can cause central vision loss. There are a large number of genes linked to retinitis pigmentosa. Type 32 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 1p21.3-p13.3.
  • Retinitis Pigmentosa 33: Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disorder characterized by progressive loss of peripheral vision and night vision difficulties that can cause central vision loss. There are a large number of genes linked to retinitis pigmentosa. Type 33 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 2q11.2.
  • Retinitis Pigmentosa 34: Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disorder characterized by progressive loss of peripheral vision and night vision difficulties that can cause central vision loss. There are a large number of genes linked to retinitis pigmentosa. Type 34 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome Xq28.
  • Retinitis Pigmentosa 35: Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disorder characterized by progressive loss of peripheral vision and night vision difficulties that can cause central vision loss. There are a large number of genes linked to retinitis pigmentosa. Type 35 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 1q22.
  • Retinitis Pigmentosa 36: Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disorder characterized by progressive loss of peripheral vision and night vision difficulties that can cause central vision loss. There are a large number of genes linked to retinitis pigmentosa. Type 36 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 17q22.
  • Retinitis Pigmentosa 37: Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disorder characterized by progressive loss of peripheral vision and night vision difficulties that can cause central vision loss. There are a large number of genes linked to retinitis pigmentosa. Type 37 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 15q23.
  • Retinitis Pigmentosa 38: Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disorder characterized by progressive loss of peripheral vision and night vision difficulties that can cause central vision loss. There are a large number of genes linked to retinitis pigmentosa. Type 38 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 2q14.1.
  • Retinitis Pigmentosa 39: Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disorder characterized by progressive loss of peripheral vision and night vision difficulties that can cause central vision loss. There are a large number of genes linked to retinitis pigmentosa. Type 39 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 1q41.
  • Retinitis Pigmentosa 4: Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disorder characterized by progressive loss of peripheral vision and night vision difficulties that can cause central vision loss. There are a large number of genes linked to retinitis pigmentosa. Type 4 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 3q21-q24.
  • Retinitis Pigmentosa 40: Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disorder characterized by progressive loss of peripheral vision and night vision difficulties that can cause central vision loss. There are a large number of genes linked to retinitis pigmentosa. Type 40 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 4p16.3.
  • Retinitis Pigmentosa 41: Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disorder characterized by progressive loss of peripheral vision and night vision difficulties that can cause central vision loss. There are a large number of genes linked to retinitis pigmentosa. Type 41 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 4p15.3.
  • Retinitis Pigmentosa 42: Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disorder characterized by progressive loss of peripheral vision and night vision difficulties that can cause central vision loss. There are a large number of genes linked to retinitis pigmentosa. Type 42 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 7p15.3.
  • Retinitis Pigmentosa 43: Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disorder characterized by progressive loss of peripheral vision and night vision difficulties that can cause central vision loss. There are a large number of genes linked to retinitis pigmentosa. Type 43 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 5q31.2-q34.
  • Retinitis Pigmentosa 44: Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disorder characterized by progressive loss of peripheral vision and night vision difficulties that can cause central vision loss. There are a large number of genes linked to retinitis pigmentosa. Type 44 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 10q23.
  • Retinitis Pigmentosa 45: Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disorder characterized by progressive loss of peripheral vision and night vision difficulties that can cause central vision loss. There are a large number of genes linked to retinitis pigmentosa. Type 45 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 16q13.
  • Retinitis Pigmentosa 46: Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disorder characterized by progressive loss of peripheral vision and night vision difficulties that can cause central vision loss. There are a large number of genes linked to retinitis pigmentosa.
  • Retinitis Pigmentosa 47: Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disorder characterized by progressive loss of peripheral vision and night vision difficulties that can cause central vision loss. There are a large number of genes linked to retinitis pigmentosa. Type 47 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 2q37.1.
  • Retinitis Pigmentosa 48: Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disorder characterized by progressive loss of peripheral vision and night vision difficulties that can cause central vision loss. There are a large number of genes linked to retinitis pigmentosa. Type 48 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 6p21.1.
  • Retinitis Pigmentosa 49: Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disorder characterized by progressive loss of peripheral vision and night vision difficulties that can cause central vision loss. There are a large number of genes linked to retinitis pigmentosa. Type 49 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 4p12-cen.
  • Retinitis Pigmentosa 6: Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disorder characterized by progressive loss of peripheral vision and night vision difficulties that can cause central vision loss. There are a large number of genes linked to retinitis pigmentosa. Type 6 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome Xp21.3-p21.2.
  • Retinitis Pigmentosa 7: Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disorder characterized by progressive loss of peripheral vision and night vision difficulties that can cause central vision loss. There are a large number of genes linked to retinitis pigmentosa. Type 7 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 6p21.1.
  • Retinitis Pigmentosa 9: Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disorder characterized by progressive loss of peripheral vision and night vision difficulties that can cause central vision loss. There are a large number of genes linked to retinitis pigmentosa. Type 9 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 7p14.2.
  • Retinitis pigmentosa: A hereditary group of diseases that cause progressive loss of retinal function
  • Retinitis pigmentosa -- mental retardation -- deafness: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by progressive retinal damage, mental retardation and deafness.
  • Retinitis pigmentosa 1: Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disorder characterized by progressive loss of peripheral vision and night vision difficulties that can cause central vision loss. There are a large number of genes linked to retinitis pigmentosa. Type 1 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 8q11-q13.
  • Retinitis pigmentosa 27: Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disorder characterized by progressive loss of peripheral vision and night vision difficulties that can cause central vision loss. There are a large number of genes linked to retinitis pigmentosa. Type 27 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 14q11.1-q11.2.
  • Retinitis pigmentosa 29: Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disorder characterized by progressive loss of peripheral vision and night vision difficulties that can cause central vision loss. There are a large number of genes linked to retinitis pigmentosa. Type 29 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 4q32-q34.
  • Retinitis pigmentosa deafness hypogenitalism: A rare syndrome characterized by slow-progressing sensorineural deafness, underdeveloped genitals and an eye defect.
  • Retinitis pigmentosa-deafness syndrome: A condition characterized by the association of an eye disease and deafness.
  • Retinopathic oxygen toxicity: Eye damage caused by excessive exposure to high oxygen levels. This can occur in closed circuit oxygen rebreather divers who have excessive exposure.
  • Retinopathy: Any disease that occurs to the retina that does not involve inflammation
  • Retinopathy -- anaemia- CNS anomalies: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by disease of the eye retinas, anemia and central nervous system anomalies.
  • Retinopathy -- anemia -- CNS anomalies:
  • Retinopathy changes in both eyes: Retinopathy changes in both eyes refers to injury or disease of both retinas, specialized tissue in the back of the eyes that transforms light into visual impulses, which travels to the brain through the optic nerve.
  • Retinopathy changes in one eye: Retinopathy changes in one eye is a condition in which there is injury or disease of one retina, specialized tissue in the back of the eye that transforms light into visual impulses, which travels to the brain through the optic nerve.
  • Retinopathy of prematurity: Eye problems that occur in premature underweight infants who are exposed to a high oxygen environment.
  • Retinopathy, arteriosclerotic: Changes in the retina that occurs because of arteriosclerosis which involves hardening of the arteries.
  • Retinoschisis: A rare inherited or acquired condition where the retina separates into two layers resulting in progressive vision loss.
  • Retinoschisis, Juvenile, X-Linked: An inherited eye condition where degenerative changes in the eye causes the retina to split. The severity and age of onset of symptoms can vary.
  • Retinoschisis, X-linked: A rare congenital eye disorder inherited in a X-linked manner. It is characterized by the separation of the retina into two layers which results in progressive vision loss. Though close examination may show signs of the condition, symptoms such as noticeable vision impairment generally don't become evident until middle age.
  • Retinoschisis, autosomal dominant: A dominantly inherited disease of the retina.
  • Retinoschisis, juvenile: An inherited eye condition where degenerative changes in the eye causes the retina to split. The severity and age of onset of symptoms can vary.
  • Retinoschisis1, X-linked, Juvenile: A rare congenital eye disorder inherited in a X-linked manner. It is characterized by the separation of the retina into two layers which results in progressive vision loss. Though close examination may show signs of the condition, symptoms such as noticeable vision impairment generally don't become evident until middle age.
  • Revesz Debuse syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by disease of the eye retinas, anemia and central nervous system anomalies.
  • Revesz Syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by disease of the eye retinas, anemia and central nervous system anomalies.
  • Rhegmatogenous retinal detachment in both eyes:
  • Rhegmatogenous retinal detachment in one eye:
  • Rhizomelic dysplasia, scoliosis, and retinitis pigmentosa: A very rare syndrome characterized by an eye disorder, scoliosis and other skeletal abnormalities.
  • Rift Valley Fever: Mosquito-borne viral infection affecting animals and humans
  • River Blindness: Skin and eye infection caused by the helminth (worm) 'Onchocerca volvulus', transmitted via fly bites and usually seen only in parts of Africa, the Middle East and South America
  • Roifman syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by abnormal bone growth, immune deficiency and an eye disorder.
  • Roth's spots: are retinal haemorrhages with white or pale centers
  • Rubella panencephalitis: A very rare complication of rubella infection where neurological symptoms develop following a congenital rubella infection and very rarely with childhood rubella. It is believed that the condition is the result of persistent rubella virus infection.
  • Sandhoff Disease: An inherited biochemical disorder involving a deficiency of the enzyme called hexosaminidase A&B which results in the harmful accumulation of chemicals in the central nervous system and other body tissues.
  • Santavuori Disease:
  • Schizophrenia -- mental retardation -- deafness -- retinitis: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by mental retardation, deafness, retinitis and schizophrenia.
  • Schroer-Hammer-Mauldin syndrome: A rare inherited disorder characterized by an eye abnormality, incoordination and short stature.
  • Senile Retinoschisis: Retinoschisis is medical term for splitting of the retina. In senile retinoschisis, the problem occurs with old age and rarely causes severe vision impairment. It can occur in males or females.
  • Senior-Loken Syndrome: A rare inherited disorder characterized by kidney dysfunction and progressive eye disease.
  • Senior-Loken syndrome 1: A rare inherited disorder characterized by kidney dysfunction and progressive eye disease. Type 1 is caused by a chromosomal defect on chromosome 2q13. End stage kidney disease usually occurs early in the second decade.
  • Senior-Loken syndrome 3: A rare inherited disorder characterized by kidney dysfunction and progressive eye disease. Type 3 is caused by a chromosomal defect on chromosome 3q22. This form generally has an early onset.
  • Senior-Loken syndrome 4: A rare inherited disorder characterized by kidney dysfunction and progressive eye disease. Type 4 is caused by a chromosomal defect on chromosome 1p36.
  • Senior-Loken syndrome 5: A rare inherited disorder characterized by kidney dysfunction and progressive eye disease. Type 5 is caused by a chromosomal defect on chromosome 3q21.1. This form generally has a later onset.
  • Senior-Loken syndrome 6: A rare inherited disorder characterized by kidney dysfunction and progressive eye disease. Type 6 is caused by a chromosomal defect on chromosome 12q21.3. End stage kidney disease usually occurs early in the second decade and vision impairment occurs by 3 years of age.
  • Severe diabetes-like retinopathy symptoms: diabetic retinopathy can cause many severe changes in the retinal pattern such as microaneurysms, cotton-wool spots, flame-shaped hemorrhages and hard exudates
  • Shaken Baby Syndrome: A condition caused by violent shaking of a baby.
  • Short stature -- pituitary and cerebellar defects -- small sella turcica: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by short stature and brain and pituitary gland defects.
  • Sickle Cell Anemia: Sickle cell anemia is an inherited blood disorder characterized by red blood cells which are crescent-shaped rather than the normal doughnut shape. These abnormally shaped red blood cells are unable to function normally and tend to undergo premature destruction which leads to anemia. If the genetic defect which causes the condition is inherited from both parents the condition can be quite severe whereas if it is inherited from only one parent, often there are no symptoms. The abnormally shaped red blood cells can cause problems when they clump together and block blood vessels.
  • Small syndrome: A rare genetic disease characterized by deafness, muscle weakness and wasting, mental retardation and eye disorders.
  • Snowflake vitreoretinal degeneration: An inherited eye disease involving degeneration of the retina and characterized by light-colored spots on the retina. It is a slow-progressing condition.
  • Spastic paraplegia 15, autosomal recessive: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by progressive stiffness and increased reflexes in the leg muscles as well as vision problems.
  • Spastic quadriplegia -- retinitis pigmentosa -- mental retardation: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by progressive stiffness and weakness of the legs and arms, eye problems and mental retardation. The spastic paraplegia is not progressive.
  • Split hand split foot nystagmus: A very rare syndrome characterized by a split deformity of the hands and feet as well as nystagmus.
  • Spondylo-ocular syndrome: A rare, recessively inherited syndrome characterized mainly by eye and spinal abnormalities.
  • Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia, congenita: A rare genetic bone growth disorder characterized by prenatal growth deficiency, myopia and short trunk.
  • Spondylometaphyseal dysplasia, axial: A rare skeletal disorder involving abnormal bone development. The condition is characterized by flattened vertebrae, small rib cage, abnormal ribs and other bone abnormalities.
  • Stickler Syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by joint problems, distinctive facial characteristics and eye and ear abnormalities.
  • Stickler Syndrome, type I: A rare genetic disorder characterized by joint problems, distinctive facial characteristics and eye and ear abnormalities. Type 1 is caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 12q13.11-q13.2
  • Stickler Syndrome, type II: A rare genetic disorder characterized by joint problems, distinctive facial characteristics and eye and ear abnormalities. Type 2 is caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 1p21
  • Stickler's syndrome: A condition which is characterized by a hereditary progressive arthro-ophthalmopathy
  • Sunburn: A skin inflammatory reaction due to overexposure to sun
  • Synovitis granulomatous with uveitis and cranial neuropathies: A rare chronic inflammatory condition characterized by arthritis, dermatitis and uveitis. The condition may have a similar presentation to a condition called early-onset sarcoidosis and genetic testing may be needed to distinguish the conditions.
  • Syphilis: A sexually transmitted disease caused by a bacteria (Treponema pallidum). The condition is often asymptomatic in the early stages but one or more sores may be present in the early stages. Untreated syphilis usually results in remission of visible symptoms but further severe damage may occur to internal organs and other body tissues which can result in death.
  • Takayasu arteritis: A chronic inflammation of the large blood vessels leading from the aorta which results in lack of pulse in the arms and the carotid arteries, transient paraplegia and blindness and atrophy of the facial muscles. Also called Takayasu's disease, pulseless disease, brachiocephgalic arteritis or aortic arch syndrome.
  • Tapetal-like reflex: A rare genetic eye disorder characterized by distinctive appearance of the macula which isn't associated with vision loss.
  • Tay Sachs: Rare genetic disease leading to fatty deposits in the brain.
  • Toxoplasmosis: Infection often caught from cats and their feces.
  • Tractional retinal detachment:
  • Trichinosis: Worm infection usually caught from pigs
  • Tunbridge-Paley syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by degenerative eye disease, deafness and diabetes.
  • Usher Syndrome: A rare inherited disorder characterized by sensorineural deafness and progressive vision loss.
  • Usher Syndrome Type 3: A rare inherited disorder where children are born with normal hearing and vision which progressively deteriorates at a variable rate.
  • Usher syndrome, type IIIA: A rare inherited disorder where children are born with normal hearing and vision which progressively deteriorates at a variable rate. The defect occurs on chromosome 5q14.
  • Usher syndrome, type IIIB: A rare inherited disorder where children are born with normal hearing and vision which progressively deteriorates at a variable rate. The defect occurs on chromosome 20q.
  • Uveitis: A condition which is the result of inflammation of the uvea
  • Vision changes: Any change in vision or sight.
  • Vision distortion: Distortions or changes to vision
  • Visual problems: Any problems which might occur that affect ones vision
  • Vitiligo: A condition which is characterized by chronic pigmentary changes to the skin seen by white patches
  • Vitreoretinal degeneration: A condition characterised by the degeneration of the vitreous and retina of the eye
  • Vitreous detachment: Detachment of the eye's internal jelly vitreous from the rear or side of the eye
  • Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada Syndrome: A rare condition characterized by poliosis and hair, skin, eye and ear abnormalities as well as retinal detachment and neurological involvement.
  • Volubilis, syndrome du: A rare birth defect of the optic papilla which is the part of the eye where the optic nerve emerges. Usually only one eye is affected.
  • Wagner syndrome 1: A rare genetic eye disorder characterized by the early onset of cataracts, retinal degeneration and retinal detachment
  • Wagner-Stickler Syndrome: There is confusion about whether Wagner and Stickler disease are actually extremes of the same disorder and thus the term Wagner-Stickler syndrome is sometimes used. Both conditions involve varying degrees of degeneration of eye structures with Stickler syndrome also involving other variable symptoms such as deafness and facial, oral and skeletal abnormalities.
  • Walker-Warburg Syndrome: A rare inherited disorder characterized by brain malformations and retinal and muscle abnormalities.
  • Werner syndrome: A form of premature aging where sufferers start aging during adolescence or soon after and appear old by the time they reach their 30's or 40's. Milder forms of the condition may also occur.
  • Whooping Cough: An infectious condition caused by the bacteria Bordetella pertussis
  • Wyburn Mason's syndrome: A rare genetic condition mainly involving enlarged brain blood vessels and skin and eye abnormalities.
  • Wyburn-Mason Syndrome: A condition which is characterized by arteriovenous aneurysms on one or both sides of the brain

Conditions listing medical symptoms: Retina symptoms:

The following list of conditions have 'Retina symptoms' or similar listed as a symptom in our database. This computer-generated list may be inaccurate or incomplete. Always seek prompt professional medical advice about the cause of any symptom.

Select from the following alphabetical view of conditions which include a symptom of Retina symptoms or choose View All.

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Conditions listing medical complications: Retina symptoms:

The following list of medical conditions have 'Retina symptoms' or similar listed as a medical complication in our database.

 

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