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Symptoms » Skin swelling » Glossary
 

Glossary for Skin swelling

Medical terms related to Skin swelling or mentioned in this section include:

  • Acne: Pimples and blackheads on the skin
  • Acquired angioedema: A rare disorder characterized by recurring episodes of swelling of parts of the skin or mucous membranes. Sometimes internal organs may be involved. The disorder occurs in patients with lymphoproliferative or autoimmune disorders which result in the dysfunction of a complex blood protein called C1 inhibitor.
  • Acquired angioedema, type 1: A rare disorder characterized by recurring episodes of swelling of parts of the skin or mucous membranes. Sometimes internal organs may be involved. The disorder occurs in patients with lymphoproliferative disorders which affects the function of a complex blood protein called C1 inhibitor.
  • Acquired angioedema, type 2: A rare disorder characterized by recurring episodes of swelling of parts of the skin or mucous membranes. Sometimes internal organs may be involved. Type 2 is an autoimmune disorder where patients develop autoantibodies which destroy the function of C1 esterase inhibitor.
  • Adult onset angioedema: Tissue swelling that develops during adulthood. The condition may be caused by a variety of disorders such as certain cancers or allergy.
  • Allergic contact dermatitis: An allergic contact dermatitis is where the body's immune system causes a skin reaction in response to direct contact with an allergen. Symptoms usually only affect the skin directly in contact with the allergen but in severe cases, symptoms may spread around the contact site or even become widespread across the body.
  • Allergies: Immune system over-reaction to various substances.
  • Angioneurotic Edema: Involves swelling of deep skin layers and fatty tissues under the skin as well as the mucous membrane. The condition involves recurrent swelling of tissues, abdominal pain and swelling of the voice box. It is often caused by an allergic reaction to drugs or food. It is also called Quincke's disease, giant urticaria, Quincke's edema or angioedema.
  • Angiosarcoma: A rare, aggressive malignant tumor of the blood vessel cells. Also called hemangiosarcoma, malignant hemangioendothelioma.
  • Asparagus Fern poisoning: The asparagus fern is a slightly woody plant with a fern-like foliage. It has yellow-green fruit and bright red berries. The plant originated in South Arica. Skin contact with the plant sap can result in skin irritation and eating the berries can cause gastrointestinal symptoms.
  • Atlantic Poison oak poisoning: Atlantic Poison oak is a tall shrub which has a distinctive leaf shape. It is often found growing in the wild. The leaves have small clumps of hairs on the underside. The plant contains a chemical called urushiol which can cause severe skin irritation in some people.
  • Atrial myxoma, familial: An atrial myxoma benign tumor that develops in the wall that separates the two upper chambers of the heart. The familial form of the condition also involves tumors in other parts of the body such as the skin, both heart atria or the heart ventricles.
  • Blisters: Blistering of the skin.
  • Boston Ivy poisoning: The leaves of the Boston Ivy plant oxalates which is toxic to humans. The severity of symptoms depends on the quantity of leaves consumed. Skin symptoms can also occur if the skin comes into contact with the leaves.
  • Browntail moth caterpillar poisoning: A hairy, bright-colored caterpillar which can cause skin symptoms on contact with the hair. Inhalation of the hairs can cause respiratory symptoms and eye exposure can also result in symptoms. Patients with pre-existing asthma or atopic allergies may suffer more severe symptoms.
  • Calla poisoning: All parts of the Calla plant are poisonous, particularly the sap. It contains a compound called calcium oxalate crystals which can cause abrasive injuries on sensitive eyes or mucosal tissues of the digestive tract.
  • Canary ivy poisoning: Canary ivy is a vine which bears small yellowish-green flowers and black fruit. It is often used indoors and outdoors as an ornamental plant. The berries and leaves contain chemicals such a saponin which can cause severe skin irritation.
  • Candelabra cactus poisoning: The Candelabra cactus is a spiny cactus with a milky sap. The sap contains a chemical called diterpene ester which is mildly toxic if eaten and can cause minor skin irritation upon skin contact.
  • Caper spruge poisoning: The caper spruge is a herb which has a milky sap and bears flowers and fruit. The plant originated in Europe and tends to grow in mountainous areas. The plant sap contains diterpene esters which is mildly toxic if eaten and can cause minor skin irritation if skin contact occurs.
  • Century Plant poisoning: The Century Plant contains calcium oxalate crystals which can cause abrasive injuries to the eyes or mucosal linings. It can also cause skin inflammation. The sap is the most toxic part of the plant all though other parts such as the thorns can also cause symptoms.
  • Chemical allergy: A chemical allergy refers to an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a chemical. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients depending on the type and duration of the exposure and individual response.
  • Chemical burn -- skin: Burns to the skin caused by a chemical. Symptoms vary depending on the type, quantity and strength of the chemical involved as well as the duration of the exposure to the chemical and promptness of treatment measures.
  • Chemical burns: burns causing protein coagulation
  • Chemical poisoning -- Lewisite: Lewisite is a very poisonous gas which has the potential to be used in chemical warfare due to its deadly effects. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Pepper Spray: Pepper Spray is a chemical used mainly in riot control. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chrome contact allergy: Chrome contact allergy usually refers to an allergic response to chromium salts which are found in a wide range of products such as leather, paint and cement. Sensitization usually occurs in a workplace settings.
  • Churee poisoning: The Churee plant is a succulent, cactus-like, spiny plant which also bears relatively large leaves. The sap of the plant contains a chemical (diterpene ester) which can cause skin and eye irritation on exposure or gastrointestinal symptoms if eaten. The plant is considered to have a relatively low level of toxicity.
  • Cobalt allergy: Cobalt chloride allergy usually refers to an allergic response to cobalt which is found in things such as belt buckles, buttons, zips and wet cement. Symptoms usually occur when the article comes into contact with the skin and hence usually results in skin symptoms. Exposure to cobalt can also occur in an occupational setting.
  • Contact dermatitis: Skin reaction to an irritant
  • Coral snake poisoning: The Coral snake is a usually brightly colored, poisonous snake found mainly in America and Africa. The toxicity amongst species is variable. They are considered a shy snake and bites are usually the result of deliberate handling. Coral snakes have to bite for long enough to release the toxin through the fangs so envenomation tends to be rarer than for other snakes who can strike and envenomate rapidly. The snake venom contains toxins which mainly affect the nerve systems. Children tend to suffer more severe symptoms due to their smaller body size.
  • Creeping Spurge poisoning: The creeping surge is a small flowering plant with bluish-gray leaves. The plant originated in Europe and Asia and is often used as an ornamental indoor and outdoor plant. The plant contains diterpene esters which can cause symptoms if excessive quantities are eaten. Skin contact with the plant can also cause minor skin irritation. The plant is considered to have a relatively low level of toxicity if eaten.
  • Cypress spurge poisoning: Cypress spurge is a herb with narrow leaves and small yellow flowers. The plant contains diterpene esters which can cause symptoms if large quantities are eaten. Skin exposure to the sap can result in minor skin irritation.
  • Dermoid cyst: Benign cystic tumor often containing skin, hair, and other tissue
  • Devil's Ivy poisoning: Devil's Ivy is a vine related to the philodendron plant and contains calcium oxalate crystals which can cause irritation and skin reactions. All parts of the plant are toxic.
  • Diffuse systemic sclerosi: A rare condition that characterized by skin tightness affecting the trunk and extremities as well as organ involvement. It involves an early period of internal inflammation which distinguishes it from other forms of scleroderma and the organ involvement can be severe and even life-threatening.
  • Eczema: Skin rash usually from allergic causes.
  • Edwardsiella tarda infection: A type of bacterial infection. The bacterium (Edwardsiella tarda) infects freshwater-dwelling animals and transmission occurs through consuming infected animals or contact with contaminated water. Symptoms are determined by the location of the infection. Healthy people are often able to fight of the infection but those with an underlying illness or poor immune systems may be more susceptible.
  • Elephant's-ear poisoning: The Elephant's ear is a common garden plant which has large, heart-shaped leaves on long stalks. The plant contains calcium oxalate and saphotoxin which can cause poisoning if eaten and irritation upon contact with skin or eyes. The toxins are quite poisonous and death can occur if sufficient quantities are eaten.
  • Erucism: Erucism is a skin reaction to envenomation from certain poisonous caterpillar spines. The reaction can be cause by contact with the spines or hairs of the caterpillar. Even airborne caterpillar hair can cause symptoms as can spines or hair on dead caterpillars.
  • Ethylenediamine dihydrochloride mix allergy: A Ethylenediamine dihydrochloride allergy refers to an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to Ethylenediamine dihydrochloride which is often found in medicinal preparations such as skin creams and nose drops. It also has various industrial uses. Exposure is usually through skin contact and hence results mainly in skin symptoms. Exposure can occur in an occupational setting especially where the chemical is used in industrial applications.
  • Euphorbium poisoning: Euphorbium is a spiny, cactus-like shrub with green succulent stems and tiny yellow flowers. The plant contains diterpene esters in its sap which can cause symptoms if eaten. Skin exposure can result in skin irritation. The plant is considered to have a relatively low level of toxicity if eaten.
  • Fishtail palm poisoning: The fishtail palm is a type of palm with unusual fishtail-shaped leaves. It bears a fruit that contains calcium oxalate crystals which causes severe mouth irritation if eaten. The seed kernels inside the fruit are actually edible but the fleshy portion causes mouth irritation.
  • Flax poisoning: Flax is slender-stemmed herb which bears blue flowers and capsulated fruit containing smooth brown seeds. The plant originated in Europe but is found in many parts of the world growing wild. The plant contains a chemical called linomarin (a cyanogenic glycoside) which can cause symptoms if eaten in large quantities. Skin irritation can also result from skin exposure.
  • Flowering spurge poisoning: The flowering spurge is a slender plant which bears little white flowers. The plant is sometimes used for medicinal purposes by native Americans to treat conditions such as skin infections and gonorrhea but the milky sap of the plant contains diterpene esters which can cause unwanted symptoms. The plant is considered to have a relatively low level of toxicity if eaten and can also cause skin irritation on exposure.
  • Geranium poisoning: Geraniums are flowering plants often used as indoor or outdoor ornamental plants. Skin exposure to the plant can cause minor skin irritation in some people.
  • Ginger lily poisoning: The ginger lily is a perennial herb with reed-like stems. The plant originated in Australia and Asia and is often used as an ornamental garden plant. The leaves, roots and stems of the plant contain chemicals which can cause symptoms if eaten. Skin exposure can also result in minor skin irritation. The plant is considered to have a relatively low level of toxicity.
  • Heliotrope poisoning: The Heliotrope is a herbaceous plant which bears small white, purple or blue flowers. The plant can be found growing in the wild and is also used indoors and outdoors as an ornamental plant. The leaves contain chemicals which can cause symptoms if eaten or skin irritation upon skin exposure. The plant is considered to have a low level of toxicity and large amounts would have to be eaten to cause symptoms. The leaves are sometimes used to make a tea.
  • Henoch-Schonlein purpura: A form of vasculitis (blood vessel inflammation) that affects blood capillaries and affects mostly the skin, kidneys, joints and stomach.
  • Hives: Specific type of skin rash
  • Hops poisoning: The hop plant is a herbaceous flowering vine which grows in the wild but is also cultivated as a food source. The leaves, flowers and pollen of the plant can cause skin irritation upon skin exposure.
  • Houseleek poisoning: Houseleek is a small herb which bears a tight, rounded cluster of leaves. It is often used as an indoor or outdoor ornamental plant. The leaves contain alkaloids which can cause symptoms if eaten. Skin irritation can also occur upon skin exposure. The plant is considered to have a relatively low level of toxicity if eaten.
  • Idiopathic minimal change nephrotic syndrome: A rare kidney disorder which has no apparent cause. The filtering structures of the kidneys are only slightly damaged and appear to be almost normal. Progression to kidney failure is very rare.
  • IgE mediated gastrointestinal food allergy: An adverse reaction by the body's immune system to food that is driven by IgE. IgE antibodies specific to food molecules bind with the circulating food allergen and cause the release of immune response molecules such as cytokines. Symptoms usually occur soon after exposure to the allergen and usually cause skin symptoms. Severe cases may result in anaphylaxis. It is associated with allergic conditions such as pollen-food allergy and other oral allergies and immediate gastrointestinal hypersensitivity.
  • Isothiazolinone allergy: An Isothiazolinone mix allergy refers to an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to Isothiazolinone mix which is used mainly as a preservative in products such as cosmetics, toiletries and laundry products. Exposure is usually through skin contact and hence results in skin symptoms.
  • Lepidopterism: A systemic illness caused by contact with certain poisonous caterpillar spines or urticating hairs.
  • Lipoma: Tumor of fat cells usually just under the skin
  • Maidenhair tree poisoning: Maidenhair tree is a deciduous tree which bear fan-shaped leaves and green to yellow-brown fruit. The ripe fruit has a revolting smell. The fruit and the raw seed kernels contain chemicals which can cause symptoms if large quantities are eaten. Skin irritation can result form skin exposure in sensitive people. The seeds are edible if properly prepared - washed and boiled or roasted.
  • Mercaptobenzothiazole allergy: A Mercaptobenzothiazole allergy refers to an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to Mercaptobenzothiazole which is used mainly in the manufacturing process of rubber. Exposure routes can include skin contact or inhalation.
  • Milkbush poisoning: The milkbush is an unusual succulent bush which has green branches with groups of leaves at the top of the branches. It originates from Africa and India. The sap contains diterpene which can cause symptoms if eaten or skin irritation if skin exposure occurs. The plant is considered to have a low level of toxicity if eaten.
  • Molluscum contagiosum: Common wart-causing virus.
  • Myositis ossificans: A very rare progressive disorder involving calcification of muscles, tendons and ligaments.
  • Nephthytis poisoning: Nephthytis is vine with heart-shaped leaves with distinctive light-colored veins. The plant contains calcium oxalate crystals which can cause various symptoms if ingested. The damage is usually caused by the abrasive action of the crystals. Eye exposure can also cause eye irritation.
  • Nerve symptoms: Symptoms affecting the nerves
  • Nickel contact allergy: Nickel contact allergy usually refers to an allergic response to nickel which is found in most jewellery. Even high carat gold has some nickel content which may pose problems for some people. Symptoms usually only involve the skin that is in contact with the jewellery. Nickel may also be found in watch straps, belt buckles and jeans studs.
  • P-Phenylenediamine allergy: A p-Phenylenediamine allergy refers to an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to p-Phenylenediamine which is used mainly as a dye in hair colorants. Exposure usually occurs through skin contact and hence results in skin symptoms. In the case of hair colorants, skin reactions may be localized but can occasionally spread to other parts of the body. Very rare cases can result in anaphylaxis.
  • Perniosis: A blood vessel disorder where exposure to cord damp weather results in skin lesions on the extremities.
  • Peruvian lily poisoning: Peruvian lily is a herbaceous flowering plant often used indoors and outdoors as an ornamental plant. The plant contains tuliposide which can cause severe skin and eye irritation upon exposure.
  • Piggyback plant poisoning: Piggyback plant is a herbaceous plant which has green leaves mottled with a light color and spikes of small flowers which are usually brownish. It is often used indoors and outdoors as an ornamental plant. The plant can cause allergic skin reaction in susceptible people.
  • Plant poisoning -- Euphorbiaceae: Euphorbiaceae is a family of flowering plants called spurges. They contain various chemicals (alkaloids, glycosides and diterpene ester) which can cause symptoms if ingested.
  • Plumbago poisoning: Plumbago is a shrubby plant which bears white, pink or blue flowers. It is often used as an ornamental indoor or outdoor plant. The plant contains plumbagin which can cause severe skin irritation upon skin exposure.
  • Poinsettia poisoning: The poinsettia is shrubby plant which bears large leaves with small flowers nestled in bright red large leaves. The plant contains diterpene esters in the sap which can cause symptoms if eaten or skin irritation if skin contact occurs. The plant is considered to have a relatively low level of toxicity.
  • Poison sumac poisoning: Poison sumac is a large shrub or tree which has large leaves with reddish stems and a white fruit. It is usually found growing in the wild. The plant contains a chemical called urushiol which can cause severe skin irritation in some people.
  • Popcorn tree poisoning: Popcorn tree is a deciduous tree which bears elongated clusters of yellowish fruit and seed capsules containing large whitish seeds. The plant can be found growing in the wild or in gardens. The sap from the plant and the unripe fruit contain chemicals which can cause gastrointestinal symptom if eaten or skin irritation upon skin exposure. The plant is considered to have a relatively low level of toxicity.
  • Porphyria: A group of disorders characterized by excess production of porphyrin or its precursors which affects the skin and/or nervous system.
  • Primrose poisoning: Primrose is a herbaceous plant which has hairy leaves and stems. It is often used indoors and outdoors as an ornamental plant. Skin contact with the hairy leaves or stems can result in an allergic skin reaction in susceptible people.
  • Protoporphyria: An inherited disorder where an enzyme defect causes excess protoporphyrin to build up in the skin. The protoporphyrin reacts to light and causes a painful burning sensation on the skin.
  • Rough skin: The appearance of rough skin
  • Saddleback caterpillar poisoning: The Saddleback caterpillar is green with saddle-shaped markings on its back. It has four protrusions at its front and back which has stinging hairs. It is found mainly in the United states feeds on deciduous trees such as oak, cherry, chestnut and plum. Contact with the poisonous spines can result in various symptoms.
  • Scabies: Mite infection of the skin common in institutions.
  • Scleredema adultorum: A rare skin condition characterized by thickening of the skin usually in the head, neck and upper body area. The disorder is often associated with conditions such as infections, myelomas and diabetes.
  • Sea onion poisoning: Sea onion is a bulbous herb which has long narrow leaves and tall stems of small, usually white, flowers. The plant is often used indoors or outdoors as an ornamental plant. The plant contains cardiac glycoside which causes gastrointestinal symptoms if eaten. The plant is considered to have a relatively low level of toxicity. Skin irritation can also result from skin exposure to the juice from the bulb.
  • Sebaceous cyst: Cyst producing sebum.
  • Senecio poisoning: Senicio is a herbaceous plant which bears groups of small, usually yellow flowers. The plant can be found growing in the wild and is also used indoors and outdoors as an ornamental plant. The leaves contain chemicals which can cause symptoms if eaten or skin irritation upon skin exposure. The plant is considered to have a low level of toxicity.
  • Sensations: Changes to sensations or the senses
  • Skin allergies: A reaction to the exposure of the skin to an allergen
  • Skin allergy: A skin allergy is an adverse response by the body's immune system to an allergen. The response may occur when the allergen comes into contact with the skin or when it is inhaled or ingested. A skin allergy manifests in skin symptoms such as hives and itchy skin. The severity of the response is variable.
  • Skin conditions: Any condition that affects the skin
  • Skin lump: The occurrence of a lump that is located on the skin
  • Skin pain: Pain affecting the skin.
  • Skin problems: Any condition that affects the skin
  • Skin rash: Change in the skin which affects the color, appearance or texture.
  • Skin symptoms: Symptoms affecting the skin.
  • Snake plant poisoning: The snake plant has long, erect, stiff leaves which have mottled white, yellow and green markings. It bears a small scented flower. The plant contains chemicals which can cause relatively mild symptoms if eaten. Skin irritation can also occur on skin exposure. The plant is considered to have a low level of toxicity if eaten.
  • Snow-on-the-mountain poisoning: Snow-on-the-mountain is a herbaceous plant which grows in the wild in North America but can also be used in gardens as an ornamental plant. The milky sap from the plant contains diterpene esters which can cause gastrointestinal symptoms if eaten and skin irritation upon skin exposure.
  • Sores: Sores affecting the skin.
  • Spiderwort poisoning: A perennial herb often used as an ornamental house or garden plant. It has grass like leaves, flowers with three petals and capsulated fruit. The leaves of the plant contain a chemical which can cause skin irritation upon skin exposure. The skin irritation is usually mild and short-lived.
  • Split-leaf philodendron poisoning: Split-leaf philodendron is a climbing vine with a distinctive leaf which has lobes and holes. The plant bears a relatively large fruit which is edible after it has ripened for a year. The green fruit contains oxalic acid which can cause symptoms if eaten. However, some people are allergic even to the ripe fruit.
  • Spurge poisoning: Spurge is a plant which has purplish discoloration along the stem and in a spot near the base of the leaves. It bears small flowers where the leaf joins the stem. The plant contains dieterpene esters in its sap and can cause skin irritation on exposure to the skin or symptoms if eaten. The plant is considered to have a relatively low level of toxicity.
  • Streptococcal Group A invasive disease: Group A streptococci are bacteria which are commonly found in the throat or on the skin. Often it causes no symptoms but in some cases it can cause mild illnesses such as strep throat or more serious, life-threatening diseases such as toxic shock syndrome or flesh-eating disease. Transmission can occur through direct contact with infected skin sores or nose and throat discharges. Symptoms are determined by the location and extent of the bacterial infection.
  • Stryker-Halbeisen syndrome: The association of vitamin B complex deficiency, anemia and red, scaly skin.
  • Swelling symptoms: Symptoms causing swelling or enlargement.
  • Thimbleweed poisoning: Thimbleweed is a herbaceous plant which has a variety of flower colors depending on the species. It is most often used as an ornamental garden plant. The plant contains a chemical called protoanemonin which can cause various symptoms if eaten in large quantities. Skin irritation can also occur upon skin exposure.
  • Trumpet Creeper poisoning: The Trumpet creeper is a woody vine which bears trumpet shaped orange to red flowers. Skin contact with the plant can cause skin irritation but it is usually minor and short-lived. Eating the flowers or leaves can cause mild gastrointestinal symptoms if sufficient quantities are eaten but the plant is considered to have a relatively low level of toxicity.
  • Tussock moth caterpillar poisoning: A hairy, bright-colored caterpillar which can cause skin symptoms on contact with the hair. Inhalation of the hairs can cause respiratory symptoms and eye exposure can also result in symptoms. Patients with pre-existing asthma or atopic allergies may suffer more severe symptoms.
  • Type I Hypersensitivity: Type I hypersensitivity is an exaggerated response by the body's immune system to an allergen which results in some sort of adverse effect on the body. Allergens usually in the form of proteins such as pollen, foods, house dust mite and cat hair. This form of hypersensitivity results in an immediate response by the immune system following exposure.

Conditions listing medical symptoms: Skin swelling:

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