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Symptoms » Sores » Glossary
 

Glossary for Sores

Medical terms related to Sores or mentioned in this section include:

  • AIDS: A term given to HIV patients who have a low CD4 count (below 200) which means that they have low levels of a type of immune cell called T-cells. AIDS patients tend to develop opportunistic infections and cancers. Opportunistic infections are infections that would not normally affect a person with a healthy immune system. The HIV virus is a virus that attacks the body's immune system.
  • Abalone poisoning: Abalone are a shellfish that are commonly eaten by humans. The internal organs of the abalone sometimes contain toxins which can cause various symptoms. The toxins are believed to originate from toxic components in the abalones diet.
  • Abscess: This is an area of puss collected in a cavity which is constituted by necrotised tissue
  • Acne Vulgaris: Another term for the common skin disorder called acne. Acne may occur just about anywhere on the body but is most common on the face, neck and back. The condition may be mild with just a few small spots or severe where large painful cysts develop. Acne generally results from dead skin blocking skin pores which results in infection.
  • Acrodermatitis Enteropathica: A rare, chronic condition that occurs in infants and involves autosomal zinc malabsorption. Signs include blisters on the skin and mucous membranes, alopecia, diarrhea and failure to thrive. The condition may be fatal if untreated.
  • Actinic cheilitis: Degeneration of the lip due to sun damage. The condition is considered precancerous.
  • Actinomycetales infection: A bacterial infection from the order of Actinobacteria. The range of symptoms is variable depending on which bacteria from the order is involved.
  • Actinomycosis: A chronic infection usually caused by an organism normally found in human bowels and mouths. The disease usually affects the face and neck and results in deep, lumpy abscesses that emit a grainy pus through multiple sinuses.
  • Adverse reaction to chemical -- 1,2-Dibromoethane: 1,2-Dibromoethane is a chemical used in gasoline, soil fumigants, fire extinguishers, flue gases and mechanical gauge fluid. Excessive exposure to this chemical can cause serious symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies amongst patients.
  • African Sleeping sickness: A disease caused by parasites (Trypanosome brucei gamiense or T. brucei rodesiense) and transmitted to humans by the tsetse fly which is found only in Africa. Causes symptoms such as fever, chills, headache, anemia, edema of hands and feet, enlarged lymph glands, lethargy, sleepiness, convulsions and coma. Also called African trypanosomiasis and sleeping sickness.
  • African milk bush poisoning: The African milk bush originated from African and is a shrubby plant with small flowers. The milky sap contains diterpene esters which can cause symptoms if it is eaten or if the sap comes into contact with the skin or eyes. It can cause severe skin irritation and the high toxicity of the sap can cause death if sufficient quantities are eaten.
  • Allergic contact dermatitis: An allergic contact dermatitis is where the body's immune system causes a skin reaction in response to direct contact with an allergen. Symptoms usually only affect the skin directly in contact with the allergen but in severe cases, symptoms may spread around the contact site or even become widespread across the body.
  • Allergic reaction: A hypersensitivity reaction produced by the body, which results in an exaggerated or inappropriate immune reaction to a particular substance.
  • Aquagenous Urticaria: An allergy to water. The condition is extremely rare with sufferers developing hives within 15 minutes of contact with water. Patients may even react to their own sweat and tears on their skin. A special foam may be rubbed regularly into the skin to previde a barrier to water contact and thus allow the person to do things like showering.
  • Arterial occlusive disease: A condition which is characterized by occlusion of arterioles
  • Asian Dendorlimus pini caterpillar poisoning: A chronic illness caused by contact with certain a poisonous caterpillar called Dendorlimus pini. Contact with the cocoon can also cause symptoms. These caterpillars can be found in Asia, north Africa and eastern Europe.
  • Asparagus Fern poisoning: The asparagus fern is a slightly woody plant with a fern-like foliage. It has yellow-green fruit and bright red berries. The plant originated in South Arica. Skin contact with the plant sap can result in skin irritation and eating the berries can cause gastrointestinal symptoms.
  • Asparagus berry overdose: The asparagus plant has bright red berries which can cause skin and gastrointestinal problems which are relatively minor and short-lived. The young shoots of the asparagus plant can also cause problems.
  • Atlantic Poison oak poisoning: Atlantic Poison oak is a tall shrub which has a distinctive leaf shape. It is often found growing in the wild. The leaves have small clumps of hairs on the underside. The plant contains a chemical called urushiol which can cause severe skin irritation in some people.
  • Autoimmune Vasculitis: A inflammation of the blood vessels caused by an autoimmune reaction
  • Autoimmune progesterone dermatitis: A skin rash that appears to be a result of the body's immune reaction to progesterone. As progesterone production is linked to menstrual cycles, the rash occurs usually in the week before menstruation until a few days after menstruation starts.
  • Autosensitization dermatitis: A skin reaction involving the development of a variety of skin lesions in response to infections (virus, bacteria, fungus, parasite), inflammatory skin conditions or other triggers. The skin reaction may vary considerable in appearance from itchy red skin to the development of blisters and may involve variable portions of the body.
  • Baby bottle nipples induced allergies: Baby bottle nipples induced allergies are an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to the latex in Baby bottle nipples . Symptoms usually involve the mouth.
  • Bacteremia: A condition where bacteria is present in the blood.
  • Bacterial appendicitis: Appendicitis is inflammation of the inner lining of the vermiform appendix that spreads to its other parts. Appendicitis may occur for several reasons, such as an infection of the appendix, but the most important step is the obstruction of the appendiceal lumen.
  • Bacterial diseases: Diseases caused by a bacterial infection
  • Bahemuka Brown syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized by spastic paraplegia and skin pigmentation irregularities.
  • Baneberry poisoning: Baneberries are toxic and can cause a skin reaction on contact or various poisoning symptoms.
  • Basal cell carcinoma: Basal cell carcinoma is a slow-growing form of skin cancer.
  • Bed sores: An ulceration due to an arterial occlusion or prolonged pressure
  • Bedsores: An ulceration due to an arterial occlusion or prolonged pressure
  • Behcet's syndrome: Recurring inflammation of small blood vessels affecting various areas.
  • Bejel: An infectious disease related to syphilis but is transmitted through nonsexual skin contact. Often starts with a sore in the mouth and then progresses to affect the skin and bones.
  • Benign mucosal pemphigoid: A rare chronic disease involving blistering and scarring of the mucous membranes especially in the mouth and conjunctiva of the eye.
  • Blastomycosis: A fungal infection caused by Blastomyces dermatitidis and resulting in lung, skin, bone and genitourinary involvement.
  • Blisters: Blistering of the skin.
  • Blue rubber bleb nevus: A very rare congenital vascular disorder characterized by multiple hemangiomas on the skin and internal organs.
  • Boil: Infected puseous hair follicle on the skin
  • Box Jellyfish poisoning: A sting from the Box jellyfish contains a chemical which is toxic to the nerves, heart and skin. This jellyfish is mainly found in the waters of Northern Queensland in Australia. The tentacles should not be removed from the patient as it can cause further injection of poison.
  • Bristleworm poisoning: Bristleworms are a type of marine worm covered in bristles which they can use to sting. The bristles are strong enough to break human skin and cause symptoms.
  • Browntail moth caterpillar poisoning: A hairy, bright-colored caterpillar which can cause skin symptoms on contact with the hair. Inhalation of the hairs can cause respiratory symptoms and eye exposure can also result in symptoms. Patients with pre-existing asthma or atopic allergies may suffer more severe symptoms.
  • Bubble bath allergy: An immune-mediated reaction to exposure to bubble bath solutions. Bubble bath allergy tends to be more common in children and symptoms can vary in nature and severity.
  • Bubonic plague: Severe flea-borne bacterial disease
  • Bullous dystrophy, macular type: A rare condition characterized by loss of scalp hair, increased skin pigmentation, small head, mental retardation, short stature and blisters. The blisters do not form necessarily on skin that has suffered trauma but occurs spontaneously.
  • Bullous pemphigoid: An autoimmune disease characterized by chronic itchy blistering of the skin. Also called pemphigoid.
  • Bullous systemic lupus erythematosus: A blistering disease that can develop in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The process is mediated by autoantibodies.
  • Burkholderia pseudomallei: Gram negative, aerobic, motile rod shaped bacterium.
  • Burns: Injury from burns and scalds.
  • Buttercup poisoning: The buttercup plant contains a toxic compound called protoanemonin. The plant is most toxic while it is flowering with the sap being poisonous portion of the plant. Poisoning by eating the plant is unlikely due to the fact that skin contact is quite painful.
  • Callistin shellfish poisoning: The Callistin shellfish (Japanese Callista) is found primarily in Japan. Eating the whole shellfish can cause poisoning symptoms in humans. It is believed that the ovaries contain high levels of choline during spawning season which makes them toxic to humans. The symptoms that manifest are similar to a severe allergic reaction. Avoiding eating the ovaries is the best way to prevent poisoning - cooking does not destroy the toxin.
  • Callosities, hereditary painful: A rare skin inherited condition characterized by the development of painful calluses over pressure points in the hands and feet. Occasionally blisters filled with a foul-smelling liquid form around the calluses.
  • Canary ivy poisoning: Canary ivy is a vine which bears small yellowish-green flowers and black fruit. It is often used indoors and outdoors as an ornamental plant. The berries and leaves contain chemicals such a saponin which can cause severe skin irritation.
  • Cancer: Abnormal overgrowth of body cells.
  • Candelabra cactus poisoning: The Candelabra cactus is a spiny cactus with a milky sap. The sap contains a chemical called diterpene ester which is mildly toxic if eaten and can cause minor skin irritation upon skin contact.
  • Candidiasis: Fungal infection of moist areas such as mouth or vagina
  • Canker sores: Ulcers of the mouth or nearby areas
  • Caper spruge poisoning: The caper spruge is a herb which has a milky sap and bears flowers and fruit. The plant originated in Europe and tends to grow in mountainous areas. The plant sap contains diterpene esters which is mildly toxic if eaten and can cause minor skin irritation if skin contact occurs.
  • Carbuncle: Group of multiple boils
  • Caterpillar complication poisoning: The spines on certain caterpillars can cause a skin reaction as well as systemic symptoms if ingested. The nature of the symptoms vary depending on the species of caterpillar involved. Some only produce skin reactions whereas others can produce systemic symptoms.
  • Cellulitis: inflammation of the subcutaneous fat
  • Cercarial dermatitis: A short-lived rash that occurs as an allergic reaction to larval (cercariae) infection of the skin. These particular parasites use birds and animals as their first hosts. Larval eggs are excreted in the faeces and when they land in water, they hatch into larvae which then infect certain aquatic snails. The infected snails release another form of the larvae called cercariae which then search for a bird, mammal host. When they enter the skin of a human they die as humans are unsuitable hosts but the skin can produce an allergic reaction.
  • Chancroid: An sexually transmitted disease caused by the Haemophilus ducreyi bacteria and is characterized by painful genital ulceration.
  • Cheilitis glandularis: A rare disorder characterized by inflammation of the lower lip which cause it to become enlarged and everted. The mucous glands and excretory ducts of the lip are also dilated. The condition is associated with an increased risk of lower lip cancer.
  • Chemical allergy: A chemical allergy refers to an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a chemical. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients depending on the type and duration of the exposure and individual response.
  • Chemical burn -- skin: Burns to the skin caused by a chemical. Symptoms vary depending on the type, quantity and strength of the chemical involved as well as the duration of the exposure to the chemical and promptness of treatment measures.
  • Chemical burns: burns causing protein coagulation
  • Chemical poisoning -- 1,2-Dibromoethane: 1,2-Dibromoethane is a chemical used in gasoline, soil fumigants, fire extinguishers, flue gases and mechanical gauge fluid. Excessive exposure to this chemical can cause serious symptoms. Some people can suffer an adverse reaction to the chemical. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- 1-Amino-2-propanol: 1-Amino-2-propanol is a chemical used mainly in the synthesis of various pharmaceuticals such as methadone and opioid. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- 2,4-Dichlorophenol: 2,4-Dichlorophenol is a chemical used in the production of antiseptics, bactericides, disinfectants and fungicides. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Acrylonitrile: Acrylonitrile is a chemical used mainly in the production of acrylic and modacrylic fibers but also in the production of certain plastics, nylon dyes, drugs and pesticides. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Allyl Glycidyl Ether: Allyl Glycidyl Ether is a chemical used mainly in the production of epoxies, thermoplastics, polyester resins, adhesives and elastomers. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Allyl alcohol: Allyl alcohol is a chemical used mainly as a weed killers and as a material in the production of other chemical compounds. The chemical is readily absorbed through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Ammonia: Ammonia is a chemical used mainly in household cleaning products and bleach. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Ammonium Bifluoride: Ammonium Bifluoride is a chemical used wheel cleaners, herbicides and in the manufacture of magnesium. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Benzene: Benzene is a chemical used mainly in gasoline fuel and as an industrial solvent. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Beryllium: Beryllium is an element used mainly in vehicle electronics, optics, ore processing, microwave oven parts, fuel containers and disc brakes for aeroplanes. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Butylamines: Butylamines are chemicals used in a variety of manufacturing processes such as in the production of pesticides, pharmaceuticals, plastics, dyes, textiles and in leather tanning and photography. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Calcium hypochlorite: Calcium hypochlorite is a chemical used mainly in bleaching products, fungicides, algicides, disinfectants and deodorants. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Captafol: Captafol is a chemical used mainly as a fungicide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Chlorinated naphthalene: Chlorinated naphthalene is a chemical used in a wide range of applications: plasticizers, rubber industries, manufacture of electrical equipment and the petroleum industry. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Chlorobenzylidene Malononitrile: Chlorobenzylidene Malononitrile is a chemical used mainly in tear gas. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Epichlorohydrin: Epichlorohydrin is a chemical used for a variety of applications - epoxy production, insecticides, solvent and agricultural chemical. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The chemical is readily absorbed through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Ether: Ether is a chemical used mainly as an anesthetic and industrial solvent. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Ethyleneamine: Ethyleneamine is a chemical which is widely used in the manufacture of products such as adhesive, paper, textiles, fuels, lubricants, varnishes, lacquers, coating resins, cosmetics, photographic chemicals and agricultural chemicals. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Formaldehyde: Formaldehyde is a chemical used mainly in blues, lacquers, fireproofing, electrical insulation, leather tanning products and embalming. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Hexachlorobenzene: Hexachlorobenzene is a chemical used mainly in seed treatments. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Hexachlorobutadiene: Hexachlorobutadiene is a chemical used mainly in fumigants and as a solvent in the manufacture of products such as lubricants and rubber. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Hexamethylene Diisocyanate: Hexamethylene Diisocyanate is a chemical used mainly in the production of various products: lacquer, paint, varnish, synthetic rubber, wire insulation, plastic, foams and glue. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Hydrogen Fluoride: Hydrogen Fluoride is a chemical used mainly in car cleaning products and in the production of integrated circuits. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Lewisite: Lewisite is a very poisonous gas which has the potential to be used in chemical warfare due to its deadly effects. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Methyl Bromide: Methyl Bromide is a chemical used mainly in insecticides, fire extinguishers, wool degreasers and oil extraction. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Morpholine: Morpholine is a chemical used in a variety of applications: rubber industry, corrosion inhibitor, pharmaceuticals, dyes, crop pesticides and as a solvent in various manufacturing processes. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Palladium: Palladium is a chemical which is very widely used in manufactured goods: jewelry, electronics, dentistry, medicine, groundwater treatment and fuel cells . Palladium carries a high risk of sensitization. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Pentachlorophenol: Pentachlorophenol is a chemical used mainly in fungicides, herbicides, insecticides, molluscicides, algicides and bactericides. It is commonly used as a wood preservative. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Pepper Spray: Pepper Spray is a chemical used mainly in riot control. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Platinum: Platinum is a metal used mainly in jewelry, electrical contacts, dentistry, laboratory equipment and vehicle emission control devices. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Rhodium: Rhodium is metallic element used mainly in platinum and palladium alloys and vehicle catalytic converters. It is also used in jewelry, high quality pens, and as a catalyst in various industrial processes. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Selenium Dioxide: Selenium Dioxide is a chemical used mainly in gun bluing solutions. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Silver: Silver is a chemical used mainly in electric products and photography. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Sodium Azide: Sodium Azide is a chemical used mainly in nematocides, herbicides, explosives detonators and in vehicle air bags. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Sodium Hypochlorite: Sodium Hypochlorite is a chemical used mainly in disinfectants, bleach, deodorizers and as a water purifier. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Sulfur Trioxide: Sulfur Trioxide is a chemical used mainly in the production of sulfuric acid and explosives. Sulfur trioxide is also a significant air pollutant which can mix with moisture in the air to produce "acid rain". Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Tetramethylammonium Hydroxide: Tetramethylammonium Hydroxide is a chemical used mainly in the production of a variety of electronic components. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Thioglycolic Acid: Thioglycolic Acid is a chemical used mainly in leather processing and in the production of hair straightening solutions, hair removal products, polyvinyl chloride, pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals and in metal detection reactions. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Vinyl Acetate: Vinyl Acetate is a chemical used in the manufacturing process of a wide range of products such as adhesives, paints, textiles, wood glue and vehicle glass . Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- acetic acid: Acetic acid is a chemical used for medicinal purposes such as superficial ear infections, jellyfish stings and bladder irrigation. Acetic acid is a also a component of vinegar which is used as a cooking ingredient. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chickenpox: Common viral infection.
  • Chirodropidae poisoning: Chirodropidae are jellyfish-like marine organisms found mainly in the Indian and Pacific Oceans. They can deliver a painful sting which can be life-threatening in some cases. The box jellyfish, Irukundji jellyfish and some sea wasps are all members of this class.
  • Chrome contact allergy: Chrome contact allergy usually refers to an allergic response to chromium salts which are found in a wide range of products such as leather, paint and cement. Sensitization usually occurs in a workplace settings.
  • Chronic Granulomatous Disease: A very rare inherited blood disorder where certain cells involved with immunity (phagocytes) are unable to destroy bacteria and hence the patient suffers repeated bacterial infections.
  • Chronic abscess: hronic abscess occurs in women who are not breastfeeding
  • Churee poisoning: The Churee plant is a succulent, cactus-like, spiny plant which also bears relatively large leaves. The sap of the plant contains a chemical (diterpene ester) which can cause skin and eye irritation on exposure or gastrointestinal symptoms if eaten. The plant is considered to have a relatively low level of toxicity.
  • Circulatory disorder: Disease affecting circulation of blood
  • Cocky Apple stinging caterpillar poisoning: Contact with the poisonous hairs or spines of the Cocky Apple stinging caterpillar can cause skin rashes or even a hypersensitivity reaction in some cases.
  • Cold sores: An acute viral disease marked by groups of vesicles on the skin that occur\ on the lips or nares
  • Common Woolly Bear moth caterpillar poisoning: Contact with the poisonous hairs or spines of the Common Woolly Bear moth caterpillar can cause skin rashes or even a hypersensitivity reaction in some cases.
  • Complement component deficiency: Complement components are a part of the immune defense system involved in destroying and removing invading pathogens such as bacteria. A deficiency of the complement components can affect the ability of the body's immune system to function properly. The disorder which can be partial or complete and may be inherited or acquired. The severity of the symptoms is determined by which complement component (there are at least 30 of them) is deficient and whether the deficiency is partial or complete.
  • Complement receptor deficiency: Complement receptors are a part of the immune defense system and they initiate the process of destroying and removing invading pathogens. A deficiency of complement receptors thus affects the immune system. It may be inherited or be associated with autoimmune disorders such as systemic lupus erythematosus diabetic nephropathy patients on hemodialysis.
  • Condoms and diaphragms induced allergies: Condoms and diaphragms induced allergies are an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to the latex in condoms and diaphragms.
  • Congenital herpes simplex: An infant born with a herpes simplex infection transmitted through the mother. The infection may be localized or involve various internal organs and even the central nervous system in which case death can occur.
  • Connective tissue disorders: Any condition affecting connective tissues.
  • Contact dermatitis: Skin reaction to an irritant
  • Creeping Spurge poisoning: The creeping surge is a small flowering plant with bluish-gray leaves. The plant originated in Europe and Asia and is often used as an ornamental indoor and outdoor plant. The plant contains diterpene esters which can cause symptoms if excessive quantities are eaten. Skin contact with the plant can also cause minor skin irritation. The plant is considered to have a relatively low level of toxicity if eaten.
  • Creeping disease: A skin disease caused by a parasite which tunnels its way through the skin leaving a visible red, itchy, linear eruption on the skin where it has been. The hookworm parasite can't use humans to complete its life cycle but continues to travel through the skin until it dies. Transmission usually occurs through skin contact with warm, moist soil contaminated by the feces of an infected animal.
  • Crohn's disease: Crohn's disease causes inflammation of the digestive system. It is one of a group of diseases called inflammatory bowel disease. The disease can affect any area from the mouth to the anus. It often affects the lower part of the small intestine called the ileum.
  • Crown of Thorns poisoning: The Crown of Thorns is a spiny, spreading shrub which can grow to a couple of metres in height. Some species of the plant are poisonous if ingested, can cause a skin reaction in susceptible people and can also cause severe symptoms if eye exposure occurs. Toxicity varies among species.
  • Crystal meth addiction: An uncontrollable desire to use crystal meth on a regular basis. Crystal meth is a powerful stimulant used illegally for its effects. It is highly addictive and known by street names such as ice, speed, glass, crank and chalk. Frequent use leads to an increased tolerance to the drug so higher and higher doses are required to achieve the desired euphoric feeling.
  • Cutaneous mastocytosis: Skin mastocytosis
  • Cutaneous necrotizing vasculitis: Inflammation and damage of the blood vessel walls that also affects the skin. The condition may occur on its own or as a result of an underlying condition.
  • Cutaneous vascularitis: Inflammation of blood vessels in the skin which can have any of a variety of causes such as infections or drugs.
  • Cutis Marmorata Telangiectatica Congenita: A rare birth disorder where dilated blood vessels on the skin's surface caused discolored patches of skin that has a marbled appearance.
  • Darier disease: A slowly progressing inherited skin disorder characterized by small brownish warty bumps and nail abnormalities. The skin disorder because the skin cells are not held together properly.
  • Decubitus ulcers: An ulceration due to an arterial occlusion or prolonged pressure
  • Dendrolimiasis: A chronic illness caused by contact with certain poisonous caterpillar spines or urticating hairs.
  • Dental caries: Decay of the teeth
  • Dental conditions: Conditions that affect ones dentition
  • Dermatitis: Inflammation of the skin.
  • Dermatitis herpetiformis: A condition which is characterized by a chronic pruritic dermatitis
  • Dermatitis herpetiformis related allergy: Dermatitis herpetiformis related allergy refers to the body's immune system response to gluten. IgA antibodies drive the allergic response to gluten exposure and manifests as a distinctive skin rash. The rash usually affects the knees, elbows, back, scalp and buttocks and can come and go sporadically.
  • Dermatophilosis: A form of bacterial skin infection caused by Dermatophilus congolensis. Infection usually occurs in animals such as cattle and sheep but can cause skin lesions in humans.
  • Dermatostomatitis, Stevens Johnson type: A rare but serious condition involving inflammation and blistering of the skin and mucous membranes. It is believed to be an allergic reaction that can occur in response to some drugs or infectious diseases.
  • Diabetes: Symptoms similar to those of diabetes
  • Diabetes mellitus, transient neonatal: A form of infant diabetes that starts usually in the month of life but then usually disappears within a year. The condition predisposes the infant to diabetes later in life.
  • Diabetes-like pressure ulcer: Pressure ulcer is an area of skin that breaks down when one stays in one position for too long without shifting their weight.
  • Diabetes-like symptoms: Symptoms similar to those of diabetes
  • Dialyzer hypersensitivity syndrome: An anaphylactic reaction that occurs in some patients who are dialyzed on artificial kidneys. A compound (ethylene oxide) used to dry sterilize artificial kidneys is a likely allergen.
  • Dipylidium: The dog tapeworm
  • Dipylidium caninum infection: A tapeworm (Dipylidium caninum) infection. Transmission can occur when infected animal fleas are accidentally ingested.
  • Diverticular Disease: Protrusions of the colon wall (diverticulosis) or their inflammation (diverticulitis)
  • Diverticular disease and diverticulitis:
  • Dracunculiasis: An infectious disease caused by the nematode Dracunculus medinensis which is usually transmitted by drinking water contaminated by infected crustaceans.
  • Drug Allergies: Allergies to medications or other drugs.
  • Drug-Induced Pemphigus: Pemphigus is an autoimmune skin blistering disease which affects mainly the skin - mucous membranes are rarely affected. Drug-induced pemphigus is an autoimmune response to a drug.
  • Duhring disease: A rare chronic skin disorder involving rashes of small skin bumps and blisters that are extremely itchy.
  • Duhring-Brocq disease: A very itchy skin rash consisting of red bumps and blisters which is often associated with intestinal sensitivity to gluten that is consumed.
  • Dyskeratosis congenita of Zinsser-Cole-Engman: An inherited condition characterized by recurring painful mouth ulcers, skin pigmentation and nail abnormalities.
  • East African Trypanosomiasis: East African sleeping sickness from the tsetse fly
  • Ectodermal dysplasia/ skin fragility syndrome: An extremely rare syndrome characterized by fragile skin which blisters and peels, abnormal nails and thickened skin on palms and soles. Skin blistering and peeling starts at birth.
  • Eczema: Skin rash usually from allergic causes.
  • Eczema vaccinatum: A rare condition where a person who has eczema and is exposed to vaccinia through vaccination. The condition can occur even if the inoculation doesn't occur directly onto eczematous skin. The virus can also be transferred to an eczema sufferer from a recently vaccinated person. Severe untreated cases can result in death.
  • Electrical burns: Burns caused when an electric current pass through the body or part of it. The symptoms and severity of the burn depends on the strength of the electrical current, the duration of the exposure and the part of the body involved. Prompt treatment in more severe cases can improve the prognosis.
  • Electrocution: Any injury caused by electricity
  • English Ivy poisoning: English Ivy is a poisonous vine fund in Europe, US and Canada. The leaves and berries are the most toxic part of the plant but all parts of the plant are toxic. Falcarinol and polyacetylene are the toxic chemicals found in the plant.
  • Epidermalolysis bullosa: A group of skin disorders characterized by fragile skin which can blister upon little or no trauma to the skin. There are a number of different subtypes with some being inherited and some acquired. The hands and feet are often the main parts of the body affected.
  • Epidermolysa bullosa simplex and limb girdle muscular dystrophy: A rare syndrome involving fragile skin that blisters easily as well as muscle weakness and wasting in the head and limbs. The severity of the blistering and muscle weakness is variable with some sufferers dying during infancy.
  • Epidermolysis Bullosa Dystrophica, Autosomal Dominant: A rare inherited skin blistering disorder characterized by the development of blisters on the skin and mucous membranes even with minor skin trauma. The blistered areas become scarred. The condition is caused by a defect in the collagen gene. The skin sensitivity may improve with age.
  • Epidermolysis Bullosa Dystrophica, Pretibial: A rare inherited skin blistering disorder characterized by the development of blisters on the skin and mucous membranes even with minor skin trauma. The skin condition also involves itching which usually doesn't respond to conventional therapies. The blistered areas become scarred. The condition is caused by a defect in the collagen gene. The skin sensitivity may improve with age.
  • Epidermolysis Bullosa Pruriginosa: A rare inherited skin blistering disorder characterized by the development of skin blistering and scarring mainly on the shins. The condition is caused by a defect in the collagen gene. The skin sensitivity may improve with age.
  • Epidermolysis bullosa: A group of rare inherited skin diseases characterized by fragile skin which forms blisters with even minor injuries. The blisters can be painful and can occur anywhere on the skin and even inside the digestive tract.
  • Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita: An acquired autoimmune skin condition characterized by blisters which cause scarring on the skin of joints and sometimes the skull.
  • Epidermolysis bullosa dystrophica, Bart type: A rare inherited skin blistering disorder characterized by the development of blisters on the skin and mucous membranes as well as areas of missing skin at birth. Nail abnormalities are also present.
  • Epidermolysis bullosa dystrophica, dominant type: A relatively mild form of the skin disease characterized by fragile, blistered skin.
  • Epidermolysis bullosa intraepidermic: A rare inherited skin disorder characterized by separation of the layers within the skin which results in fragile, blistered skin. The blisters usually heal without scarring and the skin that is most often placed under trauma (feet and hands) is the most affected.
  • Epidermolysis bullosa inversa dystrophica: A rare genetic syndrome characterized by fragile skin which blisters easily. The corneas, vulval and anal areas are involved as well as the trunk, neck, thighs and legs.
  • Epidermolysis bullosa simplex with mottled pigmentation: A variant of a skin blistering disease which also involved a skin pigmentation anomaly.
  • Epidermolysis bullosa simplex, Cockayne-Touraine type: A form of skin disease where fragile skin blisters if it suffers some sort of physical trauma. The blisters do not cause scarring and are exacerbated by warm weather.
  • Epidermolysis bullosa simplex, Koebner type: A rare genetic skin blistering disorder where fragile skin blisters upon minor trauma. The blistering is widespread and can cause severe scarring which can affect growth.
  • Epidermolysis bullosa simplex, Ogna type: An inherited skin blistering condition characterized by blisters on palms and soles.
  • Epidermolysis bullosa with pyloric atresia: A rare inherited blistering skin disorder which also involves a defect where the digestive system is closed off in the pyloric area. Death generally occurs even if the defect is corrected.
  • Epidermolysis bullosa, acquired:
  • Epidermolysis bullosa, dermolytic: A rare genetic syndrome characterized by fragile skin which blisters easily due to defective skin collagen. The mucosal lining of the mouth and even intestines may be effected in severe cases.
  • Epidermolysis bullosa, generalized atrophic benign: A rare inherited skin disorder characterized by fragile skin which blisters easily and often results in scars after healing. The condition is generally quite mild compared to other skin disorders involving fragile blistering skin.
  • Epidermolysis bullosa, junctional: A rare inherited skin disease which is characterized by fragile skin which readily forms skin blisters and can result in fatal complications.
  • Epidermolysis bullosa, junctional, Herlitz-Pearson: A rare blistering skin disease which can often result in infant death
  • Epidermolysis bullosa, junctional, with pyloric atrophy: A rare inherited skin disease which is characterized by fragile skin which readily forms skin blisters as well as obstruction of the passage from the stomach to the intestine (pylorus). Death usually occurs within weeks of birth.
  • Epidermolysis bullosa, simplex: A group of skin disorders characterized by fragile skin which can blister upon little or no trauma to the skin. There are a number of different subtypes with some being inherited and some acquired. The hands and feet are often the main parts of the body affected.
  • Epidermolytic Hyperkeratosis: A rare inherited skin disorder characterized by blistering, redness, scaling and ultimately thickening of the skin that occurs from birth. The severity of the condition is variable.
  • Epidermolytic epidermolysis bullosa: A group of skin disorders characterized by fragile skin which can blister upon little or no trauma to the skin. There are a number of different subtypes with some being inherited and some acquired. The hands and feet are often the main parts of the body affected.
  • Epiglotitis: Inflamation of the epiglottis in the throat
  • Erucism: Erucism is a skin reaction to envenomation from certain poisonous caterpillar spines. The reaction can be cause by contact with the spines or hairs of the caterpillar. Even airborne caterpillar hair can cause symptoms as can spines or hair on dead caterpillars.
  • Erysipelas: An infectious skin disease with symptoms such as redness, swelling, fever, large blisters and pain.
  • Erythema multiforme: An allergic inflammatory skin disorder which has a variety of causes and results in skin and mucous membrane lesions that affect mainly the hands, forearms, feet, mouth nose and genitals.
  • Erythrokeratodermia ataxia: A rare inherited condition characterized by skin and nervous system disorders
  • Ethylenediamine dihydrochloride mix allergy: A Ethylenediamine dihydrochloride allergy refers to an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to Ethylenediamine dihydrochloride which is often found in medicinal preparations such as skin creams and nose drops. It also has various industrial uses. Exposure is usually through skin contact and hence results mainly in skin symptoms. Exposure can occur in an occupational setting especially where the chemical is used in industrial applications.
  • Euphorbium poisoning: Euphorbium is a spiny, cactus-like shrub with green succulent stems and tiny yellow flowers. The plant contains diterpene esters in its sap which can cause symptoms if eaten. Skin exposure can result in skin irritation. The plant is considered to have a relatively low level of toxicity if eaten.
  • Exfoliative dermatitis: Form of dermatitis where skin flakes or falls off.
  • Extra-upper Aerodigestive Tract NK/T cell lymphoma: A form of lymphoma that occurs externally to the lymph nodes but is located in sites other than the upper aerodigestive tract, nasopharynx and nasal cavity. This particular type of lymphoma is rare but tends to be aggressive.
  • Extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma: A form of lymphoma that occurs externally to the lymph nodes. It usually in the nasal area but can also occur in the gastrointestinal tract, trachea, skin, liver and other soft tissues. This particular type of lymphoma is rare but tends to be aggressive.
  • Extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma, nasal: A form of lymphoma that occurs externally to the lymph nodes and in particular, is located in the nasal region. This particular type of lymphoma is rare but tends to be aggressive. It is often associated with the Epstein-Barr virus.
  • Extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma, nasal type: A form of lymphoma that occurs externally to the lymph nodes. It usually in the nasal area but can also occur in the gastrointestinal tract, trachea or skin. This particular type of lymphoma is rare but tends to be aggressive. Specific symptoms will vary depending on the exact location of the tumor.
  • Face symptoms: Symptoms affecting the face
  • Fallopian tube symptoms: Symptoms affecting the female fallopian tubes
  • False cactus poisoning: False cactus is a spiny, cactus-like plant found mainly in gardens in India. The plant contains diterpene esters which is mildly toxic if eaten. Skin irritation can also occur on skin exposure.
  • Febrile Ulceronecrotic Mucha-Habermann disease: A very rare skin disease characterized by bleeding skin ulcers and fever. There is no obvious cause of the condition. The skin ulcers spread and can cover most of the body. Sepsis and death is more likely in adults.
  • Fingerprints absence -- congenital milia: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by the absence of fingerprints, webbed toes and milia.
  • Fingerprints absence -- syndactyly -- milia: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by the absence of fingerprints, webbed toes and milia.
  • Fire Coral poisoning: The Fire Coral is a type of jellyfish with a seaweed-like appearance, found in warmer oceans around the world. The fire coral has stinging cells which can deliver a sting to humans. The fire coral has a hard skeletal portion which can also deliver cuts to the skin if it is brushed up against.
  • Fire coral larvae envenomation: The tiny stinging larvae of fire coral can release a toxin if they are put under pressure. Thus, any larvae trapped under swimming bathers or caps can cause toxins to be released. The skin develops an allergic response to the toxin and a rash forms. Swimming clothes contaminated by the stinging cells can produce a reaction even weeks after they have been washed and dried as the toxins are still able to be released from trapped stinging cells. Rubbing, showering in fresh water and wearing contaminated bathing suits for a long time after getting out of the water tend make the rash worse. Symptoms other than those involving the skin may occur occasionally. The condition most often occurs in places such as Japan and Eastern Russia.
  • Fishtail palm poisoning: The fishtail palm is a type of palm with unusual fishtail-shaped leaves. It bears a fruit that contains calcium oxalate crystals which causes severe mouth irritation if eaten. The seed kernels inside the fruit are actually edible but the fleshy portion causes mouth irritation.
  • Flavimonas oryzihabitans: A very rare bacterial infection that is most likely to occur in immunocompromised patients or through the use of catheters. Flavimonas oryzihabitans was previous known as Pseudomonas oryzihabitans.
  • Flowering spurge poisoning: The flowering spurge is a slender plant which bears little white flowers. The plant is sometimes used for medicinal purposes by native Americans to treat conditions such as skin infections and gonorrhea but the milky sap of the plant contains diterpene esters which can cause unwanted symptoms. The plant is considered to have a relatively low level of toxicity if eaten and can also cause skin irritation on exposure.
  • Fluke infections: An infection caused by flukes
  • Food Additive Adverse reaction -- chocolate: An intolerance to chocolate is an adverse reaction (not an immune response) by the body to chocolate. The adverse reaction results from the body's inability to metabolize the food. The amount of chocolate required to trigger the onset of symptoms and the nature and severity of symptoms may vary considerably between patients.
  • Food Additive Adverse reaction -- sulphite: An intolerance to sulphite is an adverse reaction (not an immune response) by the body to sulphite. The adverse reaction results from the body's inability to metabolize the substance. The amount of sulphite required to trigger the onset of symptoms and the nature and severity of symptoms may vary considerably between patients.
  • Fournier Gangrene: A necrotizing bacterial infection of the skin on the genitals and perineum. The condition progresses rapidly and immediate medical attention is vital to prevent the bacteria entering the blood steam and resulting in death. It is usually the male genitals that are affected. The risk of the condition is increased by surgery, extreme obesity, diabetes mellitus, alcoholism, leukemia and immune system disorders.
  • Fresh Mangrove caterpillar poisoning: Contact with the poisonous hairs or spines of the Fresh Mangrove caterpillar can cause skin rashes or even a hypersensitivity reaction in some cases.
  • Frostbite: damage to skin, soft tissues and blood vessels due to extreme cold
  • Functioning pancreatic endocrine tumor: Tumors that develop in the pancreas and cause excessive secretion of one or more pancreatic hormones such as insulin, somatostatin, glucagons, gastrin, ACTH (corticosteroids) and vasoactive intestinal peptidase.
  • Garden chrysanthemum poisoning: Garden chrysanthemums are ornamental flowering plants with pretty flowers of varying color and size. The leaves and flowers contain alantolactone which can cause severe skin irritation on skin exposure.
  • Gas gangrene: Infection of deep tissues with anaerobic bacteria due to introduction of bacteria through a penetrating injury such as a battlefield or surgical wound; the bacterial kill the surrounding tissues and release gas within the tissues.
  • Generalized pustular psoriasis: This is a rare form of psoriasis is also known as von Zumbusch psoriasis. It can be life-threatening especially in the elderly. It is characterized by the development of pustules in the flexural areas - the backs of the knees, the insides of the elbows, the armpits and the groin. These pustules continue to spread and soon they join to form lakes of pus. The pustules rupture easily and can become infected. This condition can be fatal if the patient gets dehydrated, or the infection spreads to the bloodstream. Generalized pustular psoriasis is often triggered by stopping topical or oral steroids.
  • Genital herpes: Sexually transmitted infection of the genital region.
  • Gestational pemphigoid: A rare autoimmune skin blistering disorder that occurs during pregnancy onset during second trimester with severe form recurring after delivery during menstruation.
  • Giant silkworm poisoning: A pale, yellow-green caterpillar with red legs which has poisonous green spines on parts of its back. It is commonly found in North America.
  • Ginger lily poisoning: The ginger lily is a perennial herb with reed-like stems. The plant originated in Australia and Asia and is often used as an ornamental garden plant. The leaves, roots and stems of the plant contain chemicals which can cause symptoms if eaten. Skin exposure can also result in minor skin irritation. The plant is considered to have a relatively low level of toxicity.
  • Glanders: An infectious disease caused by a bacterium (Burkholderia mallei). It is usually a disease that affects horses and mules but can also infect other animals and humans. Human infection usually occurs in laboratory settings or in those with prolonged contact with infected animals. Symptoms are determined by whether infection occurs through the skin or via the lungs or blood stream. Bloodstream infections are the most severe and usually result in death within weeks.
  • Glucagonoma syndrome: A rare condition characterized by a tumor which secretes glucagon and a characteristic spreading rash, diabetes mellitus and various other symptoms.
  • Gnathostoma Infection: Infection with a type of round worm (Gnathostoma spinigerum and Gnathostoma hispidum). Infection typically occurs through eating undercooked fish or poultry containing the roundworm larvae or by drinking contaminated water. The symptoms are determined by which tissues the worms migrate through. The worms tend to migrate mainly through the skin.
  • Granuloma inguinale: Granulomous disease spread sexually.
  • Grapeleaf skeletonizer caterpillar poisoning: Contact with the poisonous hairs or spines of the grapeleaf skeletonizer caterpillar can cause skin rashes or even a hypersensitivity reaction in some cases.
  • Grover's disease: A rare skin condition characterized by small, raised, red lesions and blisters that occur only temporarily.
  • Gypsy moth caterpillar poisoning: Contact with the poisonous hairs or spines of the Gypsy moth caterpillar can cause skin rashes or even a hypersensitivity reaction in some cases.
  • HIV related skin conditions: Skin conditions which occur in case of HIV due to decreased body immunity.
  • HIV/AIDS: HIV is a sexually transmitted virus and AIDS is the progressive immune failure that HIV causes.
  • Hailey-Hailey disease: A rare autoimmune skin disorder characterized by clusters of small blisters that erupt in high friction areas such as the armpits and groin and neck. Hot, humid weather, skin infections and UV radiation often trigger the condition.
  • Hand-Foot-Mouth Syndrome: An infectious viral disease caused by the coxsackievirus A. The disease is characterized by the development of blisters in the mouth and on hands and feet. The disease is spread by contact with body fluids from an infected person and the incubation period is 3 - 7 days. The infection is most common in children under the age of ten but can occur in teenagers and sometimes in adults.
  • Handgrips induced allergies: Handgrips induced allergies are an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to the latex in handgrips. Symptoms usually involve the hands.
  • Head symptoms: Symptoms affecting the head or brain
  • Heliotrope poisoning: The Heliotrope is a herbaceous plant which bears small white, purple or blue flowers. The plant can be found growing in the wild and is also used indoors and outdoors as an ornamental plant. The leaves contain chemicals which can cause symptoms if eaten or skin irritation upon skin exposure. The plant is considered to have a low level of toxicity and large amounts would have to be eaten to cause symptoms. The leaves are sometimes used to make a tea.
  • Helminth infections: The infection by a parasitic worm
  • Herbal Agent adverse reaction -- Clove: Clove can be used as a herbal agent that can be used topically for tooth pain or as a local anesthetic in dentistry. The herbal agent can cause an adverse reaction or even anaphylaxis in some people.
  • Herbal Agent adverse reaction -- Ginkgo biloba: Ginkgo biloba can be used as a herbal agent to treat conditions such as tinnitus, brain trauma, vertigo, blood vessel diseases and any other problems which benefit from the blood vessel dilating action of the herbal agent. Ginkgo biloba can cause adverse reactions in some people.
  • Herbal Agent adverse reaction -- Nettles: The root extracts from nettle plants can be used as a herbal agent to treat rheumatic disorders and urinary problems related to enlarged prostate. The root extract can cause an adverse reaction in some people.
  • Herbal Agent adverse reaction -- Passion Flower: Passion Flower can be used as a herbal agent to treat insomnia, nerve painand anxiety. The herbal agent contains various chemicals which can cause an adverse reaction in some people.
  • Herbal Agent overdose -- Chaste Tree: Chaste tree can be used as a herbal agent to treat menstrual problems and breast pain. The herbal agent can cause an adverse reaction in some patients. It is important to note that this herb may inhibit the effect of the birth control pill.
  • Herbal Agent overdose -- Garlic: Garlic can be used as a herbal agent to treat cholesterol problems, high blood pressure and to reduce inflammation and the risk of blood clots. The bulb of the garlic plant contain alliin and ajoene which can cause an adverse reaction in some people or various symptoms if excessive amounts are ingested.
  • Herpes: Virus with one subtype causing cold sores and another causing genital herpes.
  • Hickory tussock moth caterpillar poisoning: Contact with the poisonous hairs or spines of the Hickory tussock moth caterpillar can cause skin rashes or even a hypersensitivity reaction in some cases.
  • Homozygous protein C deficiency: A rare, potentially lethal disorder involving a severe deficiency of protein C which results in excessive blood clotting. It is characterized by skin lesions that tend to occur on the limbs mainly but may affect the buttocks, abdomen, scrotum and scalp.
  • Hops poisoning: The hop plant is a herbaceous flowering vine which grows in the wild but is also cultivated as a food source. The leaves, flowers and pollen of the plant can cause skin irritation upon skin exposure.
  • Hot pepper poisoning: Hot pepper is a plant which bears small, elongated fruit which can be red, green or yellow. The fruit and leaves contain chemicals such as capsaicin and can cause severe skin, eye and mouth irritation. Eating large amounts can also cause gastrointestinal symptoms.
  • Hydroa vacciniforme: A rare skin disorder characterized the development of crusting skin eruptions following exposure to the sun.
  • Hydroid poisoning: Hydroids are a type of jellyfish commonly found in the warmer oceans of the world.
  • Hyper-IgE Syndrome: A condition characterized by an excess of immunoglobulin E
  • Hyperimmunoglobulinemia E: A rare inherited immunodeficiency disorder characterized by frequent pus-producing infections. The body's ability to fight infection is affected by a lack of normal functioning neutrophils.
  • Hypomelanosis of Ito: A rare genetic neurocutaneous disorder characterized by unusual patterns of depigmented skin and associated disorders such as seizures, psychomotor retardation and eye abnormalities.
  • Hypopigmented lesions in children: Hypopigmented lesions in children refers are sores or ulcers that are colorless or have lost color in a child.
  • Ichthyosis bullosa of Siemens: A rare inherited form of the genetic skin blistering disorder called ichthyosis bullosa. The condition is characterized by widespread reddening, blistering and peeling of fragile skin that starts at birth. Symptoms tend to improve with age
  • IgA Pemphigus: Pemphigus is an autoimmune skin blistering disease which affects mainly the skin - mucous membranes are rarely affected. Usually the autoimmune reaction is mediated by IgG antibodies but in IgA pemphigus, IgA antibodies are involved. This form of the condition is generally quite harmless and responds well to medication.
  • Immune deficiency conditions: Any of various diseases that suppress the immune system.
  • Impetigo: Contagious skin rash from bacteria
  • Incontinentia Pigmenti: A rare genetic skin pigmentation disorder characterized by eye, teeth, bone, nail and hair malformations as well as central nervous abnormalities and mental deficiency.
  • Invasive group A Streptococcal disease: Infection with Group A Streptococcal bacteria
  • Isothiazolinone allergy: An Isothiazolinone mix allergy refers to an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to Isothiazolinone mix which is used mainly as a preservative in products such as cosmetics, toiletries and laundry products. Exposure is usually through skin contact and hence results in skin symptoms.
  • Japanese poinsettia poisoning: The Japanese poinsettia is a shrubby plant with thick, succulent, green stems. The flowers form on the ends of the branches and are red. The plant is often used indoors and outdoors as an ornamental plant. The sap from the plant contains diterpene esters which can cause symptoms if eaten. Skin contact with the sap can also cause skin irritation. The plant is considered to have a relatively low level of toxicity.
  • Jones-Hersh-Yusk syndrome: A rare congenital disorder characterized by missing toes, cleft palate, blistered skin and absent patches of skin at birth.
  • Kaposi's Sarcoma: Kaposi's sarcoma is a cancerous tumor of the connective tissue, and is often associated with AIDS.
  • Keratosis palmoplantaris -- corneal dystrophy: A rare condition where a deficiency of a liver enzyme (tyrosinase aminotransferase) causes tyrosine levels in the blood to increase and result in eye problems, mental retardation and horny skin lesions which develop on pressure points on the hands and feet.
  • Kraemer syndrome: A rare disorder caused by an abscess in the sclera which results in eye problems.
  • Latex allergies: When a person has an allergic reaction to latex
  • Latex catheters induced allergies: Latex catheters induced allergies are an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to the latex in catheters. Symptoms may vary depending on the location of the catheter.
  • Leatherwood poisoning: Leatherwood is a shrubby plant which bears elongated clusters of flowers. The plant is usually found growing in the wild. The plant contains resin which can cause symptoms if eaten. The plant is considered to have a relatively low level of toxicity. Skin irritation can also result from skin exposure.
  • Leishmaniasis: A rare infectious disease caused by any of a number of parasitic Leishmania species. Infection can cause any of three different manifestations: cutaneous leishmaniasis, mucosal leishmaniasis and visceral leishmaniasis.
  • Lepidopterism: A systemic illness caused by contact with certain poisonous caterpillar spines or urticating hairs.
  • Leprosy, susceptibility to, 1: A chronic, progressive infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae which causes skin sores and also affects the eyes, mucous membranes and peripheral nerves. The range of manifestations and severity of symptoms is quite variable. Researchers have discovered a number of genetic mutations linked to an increased susceptibility to leprosy. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome 10p13.
  • Leprosy, susceptibility to, 2: A chronic, progressive infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae which causes skin sores and also affects the eyes, mucous membranes and peripheral nerves. The range of manifestations and severity of symptoms is quite variable. Researchers have discovered a number of genetic mutations linked to an increased susceptibility to leprosy. Type 2 is linked to a defect on chromosome 6q25.2-q27.
  • Leprosy, susceptibility to, 3: A chronic, progressive infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae which causes skin sores and also affects the eyes, mucous membranes and peripheral nerves. The range of manifestations and severity of symptoms is quite variable. Researchers have discovered a number of genetic mutations linked to an increased susceptibility to leprosy. Type 3 is linked to a defect on chromosome 4q32 and 4p14.
  • Leprosy, susceptibility to, 4: A chronic, progressive infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae which causes skin sores and also affects the eyes, mucous membranes and peripheral nerves. The range of manifestations and severity of symptoms is quite variable. Researchers have discovered a number of genetic mutations linked to an increased susceptibility to leprosy. Type 4 is linked to a defect on chromosome 6p21.3.
  • Leukemia: Cancer of the blood cells, usually white blood cells.
  • Linear IgA dermatosis: A rare autoimmune skin condition characterized by blistered skin. The condition may occur after using certain drugs, following infection or there may be no apparent cause. It tends to occur in the non-reproductive years and most often affects the limbs, face or genital regions but may occur anywhere. The blisters may occur separately, in clusters or various other formations.
  • Lion's mane jellyfish poisoning: The Lion's mane jellyfish is a large stinging jellyfish found in the colder waters of the Atlantic, Arctic and Pacific Oceans. The jellyfish can deliver a painful sting with skin burning and blistering. Prolonged skin exposure can result in breathing problems, muscle cramps and even death.
  • Lipoid proteinosis of Urbach and Wiethe: A rare congenital lipoid storage disease where lipids, carbohydrates and proteins are deposited onto blood vessel walls and other tissues.
  • Listeriosis -- granulomatous infantiseptica: Listeria monocytogenes infection that is transmitted from a pregnant woman to the fetus.
  • Loiasis: A disease caused by the Loa Loa eye worm which work there way through the skin to the eye where they cause irritation and congestion.
  • Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis: A rare, progressive blood vessel disease where nodular lesions destroy blood vessels - lungs, skin and nervous system are mainly involved.
  • Maidenhair tree poisoning: Maidenhair tree is a deciduous tree which bear fan-shaped leaves and green to yellow-brown fruit. The ripe fruit has a revolting smell. The fruit and the raw seed kernels contain chemicals which can cause symptoms if large quantities are eaten. Skin irritation can result form skin exposure in sensitive people. The seeds are edible if properly prepared - washed and boiled or roasted.
  • Majeed syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by blood abnormality and recurring bone infections.
  • Malnutrition: Any disorder that relates to inadequate intake of nutrients.
  • Marsh marigold poisoning: Marsh marigold is a low growing plant with rounded leaves and small yellow flowers. The plant can be found growing in the wild or in gardens. The leaves from the plant contain a chemical called protoanemonin which can cause symptoms if large quantities are eaten. The young leaves are actually edible if they are boiled with frequent changes of water.
  • Mayapple poisoning: The Mayapple is a small flowering plant which is often found growing naturally. It bears small single flowers and apple-like fruit which turns yellow when ripe. The unripe fruit and leaves contain a chemical called podophyllin which can cause poisoning if eaten. The plant is considered highly toxic and death can occur if sufficient quantities are eaten. The leaves, roots and unripe fruit are toxic but the ripe fruit is edible. The plant has been used to treat venereal warts.
  • McGrath Syndrome:
  • Melioidosis: Bacterial infection from soil or water.
  • Mental retardation -- arachnodactyly -- hypotonia -- telangiectasia: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by mental retardation, short fingers, reduced muscle tone and spider veins (telangiectasia).
  • Mercaptobenzothiazole allergy: A Mercaptobenzothiazole allergy refers to an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to Mercaptobenzothiazole which is used mainly in the manufacturing process of rubber. Exposure routes can include skin contact or inhalation.
  • Mesquite Buck moth caterpillar poisoning: Contact with the poisonous hairs or spines of the Mesquite Buck moth caterpillar can cause skin rashes or even a hypersensitivity reaction in some cases.
  • Mesquite stinger caterpillar poisoning: Contact with the poisonous hairs or spines of the Mesquite stinger caterpillar can cause skin rashes or even a hypersensitivity reaction in some cases.
  • Milkbush poisoning: The milkbush is an unusual succulent bush which has green branches with groups of leaves at the top of the branches. It originates from Africa and India. The sap contains diterpene which can cause symptoms if eaten or skin irritation if skin exposure occurs. The plant is considered to have a low level of toxicity if eaten.
  • Millipede poisoning: Millipedes are multi-segmented arthropods that have numerous legs. They can secrete poisonous substances from their body and some can squirt the poison at their predator. Death due to millipede poisoning has not been reported though the poison can cause skin symptoms.
  • Moccasin snake poisoning: The Moccasin snake is a poisonous snake found mainly in America and Asia. Moccasin snakes include the copperhead, cottonmouth and the Siberian, Central Asian and Malayan pit vipers. They are considered less venomous than rattlesnakes The snake venom contains toxins which affect the blood and tissues rather than the nervous system. Children tend to suffer more severe symptoms due to their smaller body size. Rapid swelling of the skin around the site of the bite is a sign of a more severe poisoning.
  • Moon Jellyfish poisoning: Contact with the Moon Jellyfish can result in various mild to moderate skin symptoms.
  • Morgellons Disease: A rare disorder involving a variety of skin symptoms such as unusual sensations, skin lesions and the presence of fiber-like particles in or on the skin. There is still dissension over whether this is an actual disorder or whether it is a psychotic disorder or a skin disorder. Further research is being planned.
  • Mouth ulcers: Ulcers or sores in the mouth region.
  • Moynahan syndrome III: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by short stature, defective tooth enamel, clubfoot, skin problems and a variety of other anomalies. Blisters tend to occur during the warmer months of the year.
  • Mycobacterium haemophilum: A form of mycobacterium
  • Mycosis fungoides: Mycosis fungoides is a rare form of T-cell lymphoma of the skin. The disease is typically slowly progressive and chronic.
  • NOMID syndrome: A rare autoinflammatory disease characterized by fever, rash, arthritic changes, eye problems and chronic meningitis.
  • Nakajo syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by skin problems, various head anomalies and loss of fat in parts of the body.
  • Nakajo-Nishimura syndrome: A rare disorder involving muscle degeneration, loss of skin fat and impaired immune functioning.
  • Necrotizing fasciitis: A severe, progressive skin infection which causes progressive destruction of skin and underlying tissue. It is caused by certain bacteria and has a high mortality rate.
  • Neonatal herpes, type 1 virus: A very rare disorder where a newborn becomes infected with the herpes simplex virus usually through contact with a parent during or soon after the birth. The type 1 virus is severe compared to type 2
  • Neonatal herpes, type 2 virus: A very rare disorder where a newborn becomes infected with the herpes simplex virus usually through contact with a parent during or soon after the birth. The type 2 virus is mild compared to the type 1 virus.
  • Nerve symptoms: Symptoms affecting the nerves
  • Neuropathy, Hereditary Sensory, Type IV: A rare disorder characterized mainly by insensitivity to pain and inability to sweat.
  • Nevus Comedonicus: A rare condition characterized by the development of large comedones which can occur in groups or linear arrangements. If it is associated with other congenital malformations, it is called Nevus comedonicus syndrome.
  • Nevus comedonicus syndrome: A rare condition characterized by the development of large comedones which can occur in groups or linear arrangements. The skin lesions tend to occur mainly on the face, neck, arms and trunk. If it is associated with other congenital malformations, it is called a syndrome. There are a variety of possible malformations that can occur in the syndromic form e.g. skeletal defects, brain anomalies and eye problems such as cataracts.
  • Nicolaides-Baraitser syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by short stature, reduced hair, short fingers, epilepsy and abnormal bone development.
  • Nocardiosis: A rare infectious disease caused by the bacteria Nocardia asteroides which primarily affects the lung but may also involve the brain, soft tissues and other organs.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- mosquito: A mosquito allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to mosquito bites. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Oculocutaneous tyrosinemia: A rare condition where a deficiency of a liver enzyme (tyrosinase aminotransferase) causes tyrosine levels in the blood to increase and result in eye problems, mental retardation and horny skin lesions.
  • Oleander caterpillar poisoning: Contact with the poisonous hairs or spines of the Oleander caterpillar can cause skin rashes or even a hypersensitivity reaction in some cases.
  • Olindias sp poisoning: The Olindias is a type of hyrdozoan jellyfish found mainly in South American waters. It can deliver a relatively harmless but painful sting to humans.
  • Open wounds: cut or punctured wound.
  • Orf: A contagious viral skin disease contracted from infected sheep and goats. It results in painless vesicles that may become red, weeping sores which form a crust and then heal.
  • Osteomyelitis: An infection that occurs in bone
  • P-Phenylenediamine allergy: A p-Phenylenediamine allergy refers to an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to p-Phenylenediamine which is used mainly as a dye in hair colorants. Exposure usually occurs through skin contact and hence results in skin symptoms. In the case of hair colorants, skin reactions may be localized but can occasionally spread to other parts of the body. Very rare cases can result in anaphylaxis.
  • Pachyonychia congenita recessive: A rare, recessively inherited disorder where the nails is white and the skin is blistered.
  • Pacifiers induced allergies: Pacifiers induced allergies are an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to the latex in pacifiers. Symptoms usually involve the mouth.
  • Paget's Disease: Breast carcinoma involving nipple and areola.
  • Pale tussock moth caterpillar poisoning: Contact with the poisonous hairs or spines of the Pale tussock moth caterpillar can cause skin rashes or even a hypersensitivity reaction in some cases.
  • Paming moth caterpillar poisoning: Contact with the poisonous hairs or spines of the Paming moth caterpillar can cause skin rashes or even a hypersensitivity reaction in some cases.
  • Paragonimiases -- lung infection: Infection by a parasitic worm, Paragonimus westermani, which are a type of lung fluke which invade the lungs and other organs where they cause problems. Infection occurs through eating freshwater crabs and crayfish which have not been cooked sufficiently.
  • Paragonimiasis: Infection by a parasitic worm, Paragonimus westermani, which are a type of lung fluke which invade the lungs, and sometimes other organs, where they cause problems. Occasionally the parasites infect the brain which can occasionally result in death. Infection occurs through eating freshwater crabs and crayfish which have not been cooked sufficiently.
  • Parasitic appendicitis: Appendicitis is inflammation of the inner lining of the vermiform appendix that spreads to its other parts. Appendicitis may occur for several reasons, with parasitic diseases being one of the causes.
  • Peanut allergies: A hypersensitive state that is due to exposure to an allergen contained in peanuts
  • Pediculosis: Medical name for infection with lice (see head lice)
  • Pellagra-like syndrome: A rare disorder where the body is unable to metabolise tryptophan which causes a distinctive skin rash and neurological symptoms.
  • Pemphigus: A rare group of autoimmune skin disorders where blisters or raw sores develop on the skin and mucous membranes. The bodies immune system destroys proteins the hold skin cells together resulting in blistering. The condition can be life-threatening if untreated.
  • Pemphigus Foliaceus: A relatively milder form of the autoimmune skin disorder called pemphigus. Blisters occur on the skin but usually the mucous membranes are unaffected.
  • Pemphigus Vulgaris: A severe autoimmune skin disease characterized by blistering of the skin including the mucous membranes inside the mouth and esophagus.
  • Pemphigus and fogo selvagem: An autoimmune skin disease characterized by skin blisters and a burning sensation. It is endemic particularly in Brazil but may also occur in other countries.
  • Pemphigus paraneoplastic: A rare type of autoimmune skin blistering disease which affects the skin and/or mucous membranes and occurs in patients with cancer.
  • Pemphigus vulgaris, familial: A very rare skin blistering disorder caused by an autoimmune reaction. The mucous membranes as well as the skin is affected. Soft fragile blisters usually start in the mouth and on the scalp. Healed blisters leave no scarring.
  • Penicillin allergy: Taking penicillin (a type of antibiotic) can cause an allergic response in some people. It involves the body's immune system overreacting to the drug. The type and severity of symptoms can vary considerable though skin symptoms are the most common allergic response to drugs. Penicillin allergy is one of the more common types of drug allergies.
  • Periorbital cellulitis: Bacterial infection of the superficial tissues surrounding the eyes, often following a conjunctivitis or middle ear infection
  • Peruvian lily poisoning: Peruvian lily is a herbaceous flowering plant often used indoors and outdoors as an ornamental plant. The plant contains tuliposide which can cause severe skin and eye irritation upon exposure.
  • Pfiesteria piscicida infection: Pfiesteria piscicida is a tiny marine organism called a dinoflagellate that is found in waters where fresh and salt water mix e.g. at river mouths. It is believed to be responsible for killing fish as well as health problems in humans.
  • Phenylketonuria: A metabolic disorder where there is a deficiency of the enzyme phenylalanine hydroxylase which leads to a harmful buildup of the phenylalanine in the body. Normally the phenylalanine is converted into tyrosine. The severity of the symptoms can range from severe enough to cause mental retardation to mild enough not to require treatment. Severity is determined by the level of impairment of enzyme activity of phenylalanine hydroxylase.
  • Phototoxic eczema: Phototoxic eczema is skin irritation and inflammation which occurs as an abnormal response to exposure to UV light radiation. The cause of this sensitivity may result from the use of certain drugs or exposure various other photosensitizing substances such as certain plants.
  • Piggyback plant poisoning: Piggyback plant is a herbaceous plant which has green leaves mottled with a light color and spikes of small flowers which are usually brownish. It is often used indoors and outdoors as an ornamental plant. The plant can cause allergic skin reaction in susceptible people.
  • Pityriasis lichenoides et varioliformis acuta: An acute inflammatory skin condition possible caused by abnormal immune system functioning. It involves the development of a skin rash consisting of small skin bumps which eventually blister and form crusted red-brown spots.
  • Plague: Any epidemic disease with a high death rate.
  • Plant poisoning -- Euphorbiaceae: Euphorbiaceae is a family of flowering plants called spurges. They contain various chemicals (alkaloids, glycosides and diterpene ester) which can cause symptoms if ingested.
  • Plumbago poisoning: Plumbago is a shrubby plant which bears white, pink or blue flowers. It is often used as an ornamental indoor or outdoor plant. The plant contains plumbagin which can cause severe skin irritation upon skin exposure.
  • Poikiloderma of Kindler: A rare disorder characterized by fragile skin which blisters easily even after a mild trauma as well as photosensitivity and striated skin pigmentation (diffuse poikiloderma striate.
  • Poikiloderma of Rothmund-Thomson: A rare disease which causes sufferers to have a senile-like appearance with skin, growth, hair and eye abnormalities.
  • Poinsettia poisoning: The poinsettia is shrubby plant which bears large leaves with small flowers nestled in bright red large leaves. The plant contains diterpene esters in the sap which can cause symptoms if eaten or skin irritation if skin contact occurs. The plant is considered to have a relatively low level of toxicity.
  • Poison sumac poisoning: Poison sumac is a large shrub or tree which has large leaves with reddish stems and a white fruit. It is usually found growing in the wild. The plant contains a chemical called urushiol which can cause severe skin irritation in some people.
  • Pollen allergy: An allergic reaction that occurs due to exposure to pollen
  • Pompholyx (dyshidrotic eczema): Pompholyx is an itchy skin condition characterized by small fluid-filled blisters. The condition tends to predominantly affect the fingers, toes, palms and soles. This form of eczema is relatively uncommon.
  • Popcorn tree poisoning: Popcorn tree is a deciduous tree which bears elongated clusters of yellowish fruit and seed capsules containing large whitish seeds. The plant can be found growing in the wild or in gardens. The sap from the plant and the unripe fruit contain chemicals which can cause gastrointestinal symptom if eaten or skin irritation upon skin exposure. The plant is considered to have a relatively low level of toxicity.
  • Porphyria: A group of disorders characterized by excess production of porphyrin or its precursors which affects the skin and/or nervous system.
  • Portugese Man-of-War larvae envenomation: The tiny stinging larvae of the Portugese Man-of-War can release a toxin if they are put under pressure. Thus, any larvae trapped under swimming bathers or caps can cause toxins to be released. The skin develops an allergic response to the toxin and a rash forms. Swimming clothes contaminated by the stinging cells can produce a reaction even weeks after they have been washed and dried as the toxins are still able to be released from trapped stinging cells. Rubbing, showering in fresh water and wearing contaminated bathing suits for a long time after getting out of the water tend make the rash worse. Symptoms other than those involving the skin may occur occasionally. The condition most often occurs in the Atlantic Ocean.
  • Pregnancy symptoms: Symptoms related to pregnancy.
  • Primrose poisoning: Primrose is a herbaceous plant which has hairy leaves and stems. It is often used indoors and outdoors as an ornamental plant. Skin contact with the hairy leaves or stems can result in an allergic skin reaction in susceptible people.
  • Processionary tree caterpillar poisoning: A dark, grey-black caterpillar which can cause varying symptoms on contact with its hairs or spines.
  • Prostatic tuberculosis: Tuberculous prostatitis must be viewed as a systemic disease, and the treatment is primarily medical. Hospitalization is usually unnecessary but may be required to treat noncompliant patients.
  • Protoporphyria: An inherited disorder where an enzyme defect causes excess protoporphyrin to build up in the skin. The protoporphyrin reacts to light and causes a painful burning sensation on the skin.
  • Pseudomonas pseudomallei: A form of pseudomonas
  • Psoriasis: Psoriasis is an inflammatory skin condition where the defective immune system causes skin cells to grow rapidly. It affects a significant number of people. Arthritis, which can be severe, is associated with the psoriasis in up to a third of cases. Not all patients who are susceptible to the condition will develop it - roughly 10% of those susceptible will actually develop the condition. There are various environmental factors which can trigger the onset of the disease e.g. strep throat (common trigger), some medication, stress and cold weather. Once the disease develops, it may resolve on its own or with treatment or may become a persistent chronic condition. The severity and duration of symptoms is variable.
  • Pus: White or yellow oozing fluid
  • Pustular rash: The occurrence of a rash which is composed of pustular lesions
  • Ramsay Hunt syndrome Type II: A condition caused by a reactivation of the herpes simplex virus and resulting in facial paralysis, ear pain and skin blistering.
  • Randa's Eyed Silk moth caterpillar poisoning: Contact with the poisonous hairs or spines of the Randa's Eyed Silk moth caterpillar can cause skin rashes or even a hypersensitivity reaction in some cases.
  • Rat-bite fever: A disease caused by a rat bite where the patient becomes infected by a bacteria (causes skin ulceration and recurrent fever) or a fungus (causes skin inflammation, muscle pain and vomiting). Also called sodokosis.
  • Rattle snake poisoning: The Rattle snake is a poisonous snake found mainly in America. They are distinguished by a characteristic rattle at the tip of their tail.
  • Recurring Boil: A boil is an infected hair follicle located on the skin. The lesion is full of pus and can be quite painful. A recurring boil is one that reoccurs.
  • Red Whelk poisoning: Red Whelk are colorful, carnivorous snail found mainly in Britain and Japan. The salivary gland of some whelks contains tetramine which can cause symptoms in humans if eaten. Raw, cooked or canned whelk can cause poisoning. Red whelk have the highest concentration of toxins in the summer. Whelk is often used as fish bait.
  • Rheumatoid vasculitis: A rare disorder where sufferers of rheumatoid arthritis with joint inflammation develop inflammation of small and medium sized blood vessels. It tends to mostly affect the blood vessels in the skin. The symptoms are determined by which part of the body is affected.
  • Rhodococcus equi: A rare form of bacterial infection that usually affects horses and foals but can cause infection mainly in immunocompromised people. Infection usually starts at the site of some sort of trauma. Symptoms and severity may vary considerably depending on the location and extent of the infection.
  • Ritter syndrome: A rare infantile skin disorder involving severe redness, inflammation, blistering and peeling of skin and mucous membranes which can result from a variety of infections, malignancies and drugs.
  • Rodent ulcer: Facial ulcer not actually related to rodents
  • Rothmund-Thomson Syndrome: A syndrome which is characterized by atrophy, pigmentation and telangiectasia of the skin.
  • Roundworm: A worm of the class nematode
  • SCID: Major failure of the immune system, usually genetic.
  • Satin moth caterpillar poisoning: Contact with the poisonous hairs or spines of the Satin moth caterpillar can cause skin rashes or even a hypersensitivity reaction in some cases.
  • Scabbing skin: The occurrence of scabbing that is located on the skin
  • Scabs: Skin crusting over to form scans
  • Scaly eruptions: The occurrence of scaly like eruptions that are located on the skin
  • Sea anemone larvae envenomation: The tiny stinging larvae of certain sea anemone (Edwardsiella lineata) can release a toxin if they are put under pressure. Thus, any larvae trapped under swimming bathers or caps can cause toxins to be released. The skin develops an allergic response to the toxin and a rash forms. Swimming clothes contaminated by the stinging cells can produce a reaction even weeks after they have been washed and dried as the toxins are still able to be released from trapped stinging cells. Rubbing, showering in fresh water and wearing contaminated bathing suits for a long time after getting out of the water tend make the rash worse. Symptoms other than those involving the skin may occur occasionally.
  • Sea bather's eruption: A rash that can develop sometimes when swimming in the ocean. The rash forms on the skin covered by the bathing suit and is caused by an allergic response to stinging cells from the larvae of certain sea anemones and thimble jellyfish which become trapped under the bathers. Stings are most likely to occur in summer. Swimming clothes contaminated by the stinging cells can produce a reaction even weeks after they have been washed and dried as the toxins are still able to be released from trapped stinging cells. Rubbing, showering in fresh water and wearing contaminated bathing suits for a long time after getting out of the water tend make the rash worse. Symptoms other than those involving the skin may occur occasionally. The condition most often occurs in Thailand, Brazil, the Bahamas and the Philippines.
  • Sea onion poisoning: Sea onion is a bulbous herb which has long narrow leaves and tall stems of small, usually white, flowers. The plant is often used indoors or outdoors as an ornamental plant. The plant contains cardiac glycoside which causes gastrointestinal symptoms if eaten. The plant is considered to have a relatively low level of toxicity. Skin irritation can also result from skin exposure to the juice from the bulb.
  • Sea thimble larvae envenomation: The tiny stinging larvae of the sea thimble can release a toxin if they are put under pressure. Thus, any larvae trapped under swimming bathers or caps can cause toxins to be released. The skin develops an allergic response to the toxin and a rash forms. Swimming clothes contaminated by the stinging cells can produce a reaction even weeks after they have been washed and dried as the toxins are still able to be released from trapped stinging cells. Rubbing, showering in fresh water and wearing contaminated bathing suits for a long time after getting out of the water tend make the rash worse. Symptoms other than those involving the skin may occur occasionally.
  • Sea wasp poisoning: The sea wasp can deliver a serious sting and can be found in the waters of Northern Australia and the Philippines. Death can occur in as little as a few minutes if a person is severely stung.
  • Sea wasp poisoning (Chiropsalmus quadrigatus): The Chiropsalmus quadrigatus jellyfish can deliver a serious sting and can be found in the waters of Northern Australia and the Philippines. Death can occur in as little as a few minutes if a person is severely stung.
  • Sea wasp poisoning -- Chironex fleckeri: The Chironex fleckeri jellyfish is one of the deadliest jellyfish in the world. It can deliver a serious sting and can be found mainly in the waters of Northern Australia and the Philippines. Death can occur in as little as a few minutes if a person is severely stung.
  • Sebaceous cyst: Cyst producing sebum.
  • Senecio poisoning: Senicio is a herbaceous plant which bears groups of small, usually yellow flowers. The plant can be found growing in the wild and is also used indoors and outdoors as an ornamental plant. The leaves contain chemicals which can cause symptoms if eaten or skin irritation upon skin exposure. The plant is considered to have a low level of toxicity.
  • Sensations: Changes to sensations or the senses
  • Sepsis: The presence of microorganisms in the blood circulation
  • Septicemia: A systemic inflammatory response to an infection.
  • Shingles: Infectious viral infection occuring years after chickenpox infection.
  • Short limbs subluxed knees cleft palate: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by short limbs, partially dislocated knees and a cleft palate.
  • Sialadenitis: Inflammation of a salivary gland.
  • Sickle Cell Anemia: Sickle cell anemia is an inherited blood disorder characterized by red blood cells which are crescent-shaped rather than the normal doughnut shape. These abnormally shaped red blood cells are unable to function normally and tend to undergo premature destruction which leads to anemia. If the genetic defect which causes the condition is inherited from both parents the condition can be quite severe whereas if it is inherited from only one parent, often there are no symptoms. The abnormally shaped red blood cells can cause problems when they clump together and block blood vessels.
  • Sigmoid diverticulitis: Colonic diverticulitis is a condition resulting from the perforation of a colonic diverticulum which leads to inflammatory changes occurring mainly in the pericolic structures.
  • Silky Oak poisoning: The silky oak is a tree that bears orange-red, bottlebrush-like flowers. It is found in Australia and contains a chemical called resorcinol which can cause severe skin irritation on exposure.
  • Silver Spotted Tiger moth caterpillar poisoning: Contact with the poisonous hairs or spines of the Silver Spotted Tiger moth caterpillar can cause skin rashes or even a hypersensitivity reaction in some cases.
  • Skin Cancer: The occurrence of a malignancy that is located on the skin
  • Skin Diseases, Vesiculobullous: Skin diseases involving blisters which may occur in small localized areas of the skin or be spread over large areas of skin.
  • Skin Diseases, Viral: Any condition affecting the skin and caused by a virus. There is a range of viruses that can affect the skin in a number of ways Epstein-Barr, Fifth disease, viral warts, shingles, measles and herpes.
  • Skin allergies: A reaction to the exposure of the skin to an allergen
  • Skin allergy: A skin allergy is an adverse response by the body's immune system to an allergen. The response may occur when the allergen comes into contact with the skin or when it is inhaled or ingested. A skin allergy manifests in skin symptoms such as hives and itchy skin. The severity of the response is variable.
  • Skin blistering: The occurrence of blistering on the skin
  • Skin cancer: The occurrence of a malignancy that is located on the skin
  • Skin conditions: Any condition that affects the skin
  • Skin lesion: Lesions appearing on the skin.
  • Skin problems: Any condition that affects the skin
  • Skin rash: Change in the skin which affects the color, appearance or texture.
  • Skin sores: The occurrence of sores that are located on the skin
  • Skin symptoms: Symptoms affecting the skin.
  • Snake bite: When a person is bitten by a snake
  • Sneddon-Wilkinson disease: A rare chronic condition involving the development of blisters and pustules, usually on the trunk, armpits and flexural areas. It is often associated with conditions such as thyroid problems, lupus and rheumatoid arthritis. The condition tends to flare up for a few weeks and the clear up for months or years before recurring.
  • Snow-on-the-mountain poisoning: Snow-on-the-mountain is a herbaceous plant which grows in the wild in North America but can also be used in gardens as an ornamental plant. The milky sap from the plant contains diterpene esters which can cause gastrointestinal symptoms if eaten and skin irritation upon skin exposure.
  • Soap allergy: An immune-mediated reaction to exposure to soap. Soap allergy tends to be more common in children and symptoms can vary in nature and severity.
  • Sores: Sores affecting the skin.
  • Sparse hair -- short stature -- skin anomalies: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by sparse hair, short stature and skin anomalies.
  • Spinal cord injury: spinal cord injury causes myelopathy or damage to white matter or myelinated fiber tracts that carry sensation and motor signals to and from the brain
  • Spiny elm caterpillar poisoning: Contact with the poisonous hairs or spines of the Spiny Elm caterpillar can cause skin rashes or even a hypersensitivity reaction in some cases.
  • Spirometra erinace-ieuropaei infection: Infection with a tapeworm species called Spirometra erinace-ieuropaei. Infection usually results from ingesting contaminated food or water. The parasite can migrate to any part of the body but usually resides under the skin where it develops into a nodule.
  • Spirometra mansoni infection: Infection with a tapeworm species called Spirometra mansoni. Infection usually results from ingesting contaminated food or water. The parasite can migrate to any part of the body but usually resides under the skin where it develops into a nodule.
  • Spirometra mansonoides infection: Infection with a tapeworm species called Spirometra mansonoides. Infection usually results from ingesting contaminated food or water. The parasite can migrate to any part of the body but usually resides under the skin where it develops into a nodule.
  • Spirometra theileri infection: Infection with a tapeworm species called Spirometra theileri. Infection usually results from ingesting contaminated food or water. The parasite can migrate to any part of the body but usually resides under the skin where it develops into a nodule.
  • Spirurida Infections: Infection with a nematode (worm) from the spirurida order. Nematodes from this order include Loa eyeworm, wuchereria and mansonella. The symptoms are determined by which species is involved. Some cases can result in severe complication if the nematode invades and organ or compresses vital nerves or blood vessels.
  • Sporotrichosis: A fungal skin infection caused by the fungus Sporothrix schenckii. Usually only the skin is infected but bones, lungs and central nervous system can rarely be affected also. Transmission usually occurs through infection of a skin wound.
  • Spots: The occurrence of spots
  • Spurge poisoning: Spurge is a plant which has purplish discoloration along the stem and in a spot near the base of the leaves. It bears small flowers where the leaf joins the stem. The plant contains dieterpene esters in its sap and can cause skin irritation on exposure to the skin or symptoms if eaten. The plant is considered to have a relatively low level of toxicity.
  • Squamous Cell Skin Cancer: Aggressive skin cancer arising due to sun exposure; lesions are locally invasive to surrounding tissues and may metastasise
  • Staphylococcal infection: Any infection caused by the bacteria staphylococcal
  • Stevens Johnson syndrome: A rare but serious condition involving inflammation and blistering of the skin and mucous membranes. It is believed to be an allergic reaction that can occur in response to some drugs or infectious diseases.
  • Stinging Bark caterpillar poisoning: Contact with the poisonous hairs or spines of the Stinging Bark caterpillar can cause skin rashes or even a hypersensitivity reaction in some cases.
  • Stinging Nettle caterpillar poisoning: Contact with the poisonous hairs or spines of the Stinging Nettle caterpillar can cause skin rashes or even a hypersensitivity reaction in some cases.
  • Stinging Rose caterpillar poisoning: Contact with the poisonous hairs or spines of the Stinging Rose caterpillar can cause skin rashes or even a hypersensitivity reaction in some cases.
  • Striped Blister Beetle poisoning: The striped blister beetle is native to many parts of America and Canada. Animals that accidentally eat the beetles can become quite ill and they can also cause symptoms in humans if accidentally ingested. The beetles contain toxic substances called cantharidin and pederin which can cause symptoms through skin or eye exposure as well as through ingestion.
  • Sun allergy: An immune system reaction to sun exposure which usually takes the form of a red itchy skin rash.
  • Sunburn: A skin inflammatory reaction due to overexposure to sun
  • Sunscreen allergy: An immune-mediated reaction to exposure to sunscreen. Sunscreen allergy tends to be more common in children and symptoms can vary in nature and severity.
  • Syphilis: A sexually transmitted disease caused by a bacteria (Treponema pallidum). The condition is often asymptomatic in the early stages but one or more sores may be present in the early stages. Untreated syphilis usually results in remission of visible symptoms but further severe damage may occur to internal organs and other body tissues which can result in death.
  • Taeniasis: An infection with a type of tapeworm
  • The clap: A sexually transmitted infection by the bacteria Neisseria gonorrhoeae.
  • Thimbleweed poisoning: Thimbleweed is a herbaceous plant which has a variety of flower colors depending on the species. It is most often used as an ornamental garden plant. The plant contains a chemical called protoanemonin which can cause various symptoms if eaten in large quantities. Skin irritation can also occur upon skin exposure.
  • Tinea: A condition which is characterized by an infection caused by a fungus
  • Toxic epidermal necrolysis: A skin condition causing widespread blisters to erupt over greater than 30% of the body.
  • Transient bullous dermolysis of the newborn: A rare blistering skin disorder that affects infants and is inherited in a dominant manner. The blistering usually only occurs during the first year of life. The blisters tend to occur mainly on the extremities and other parts of the body that receive more friction.
  • Trichinosis: Worm infection usually caught from pigs
  • True Jellyfish larvae envenomation: The tiny stinging larvae of true jellyfish (such as Linuche unguiculata) can release a toxin if they are put under pressure. Thus, any larvae trapped under swimming bathers or caps can cause toxins to be released. The skin develops an allergic response to the toxin and a rash forms. Swimming clothes contaminated by the stinging cells can produce a reaction even weeks after they have been washed and dried as the toxins are still able to be released from trapped stinging cells. Rubbing, showering in fresh water and wearing contaminated bathing suits for a long time after getting out of the water tend make the rash worse. Symptoms other than those involving the skin may occur occasionally. The jellyfish most often occur in the colder oceans of the world.
  • Trypanosomiasis:
  • Tuberculosis: Bacterial infection causing nodules forming, most commonly in the lung.
  • Tulip poisoning: Tulips are an ornamental bulbous plant which contain a toxin called tulipalin. The chemical can cause symptoms if eaten but the plant is considered to have a relatively low level of toxicity. The plant may also cause skin irritation.
  • Tussock moth caterpillar poisoning: A hairy, bright-colored caterpillar which can cause skin symptoms on contact with the hair. Inhalation of the hairs can cause respiratory symptoms and eye exposure can also result in symptoms. Patients with pre-existing asthma or atopic allergies may suffer more severe symptoms.
  • Ulcer: The sloughing of necrotic inflammatory tissue causing a local defect in the surface of an organ or tissue
  • Ulcerative colitis: Ulcerative colitis (Colitis ulcerosa, UC) is a form of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Ulcerative colitis is a form of colitis, a disease of the intestine, specifically the large intestine or colon, that includes characteristic ulcers, or open sores, in the colon.
  • Upper Aerodigestive Tract NK/T cell lymphoma: A form of lymphoma that occurs externally to the lymph nodes but is located in the upper aerodigestive tract. It includes tumors in the nasopharynx, nasal cavity as well as the upper aerodigestive tract. This particular type of lymphoma is rare but tends to be aggressive.
  • Varicose veins: Appearance of veins in the skin
  • Variegate porphyria: A rare metabolic disorder characterized by a deficiency of a certain enzyme which results in a build-up in the body of porphyrins or their precursors. This form of hepatic porphyria causes the sufferer to have acute attacks as well as skin sensitivity.
  • Vasculitis hypersensitivity: A condition which is characterised by a reaction that results in the inflammation of the blood vessels
  • Vibrio infection -- Vibrio alginolyticus: An infectious disease caused by a bacteria called Vibrio alginolyticus. This bacterium tends to cause ear and wound infections.
  • Vibrio infection -- Vibrio damsela: An infectious disease caused by a bacteria called Vibrio damsela. The nature and severity of symptoms can vary considerably depending on the type of infection caused - gastroenteritis, wound infection or septicemia. Wound infection is the most common disease associated with this bacteria and septicemia and gastroenteritis is relatively rare. Infection usually occurs through consumption of contaminated seafood or exposure of a wound to contaminated water. The elderly and very young tend to suffer more severe symptoms.
  • Vibrio infection -- Vibrio fluvialis: An infectious disease caused by a bacteria called Vibrio fluvialis. The nature and severity of symptoms can vary considerably depending on the type of infection caused - gastroenteritis, wound infection or septicemia. Gastroenteritis is the most common disease associated with this bacteria and septicemia is relatively rare. Infection usually occurs through consumption of contaminated seafood or exposure of a wound to contaminated water. The elderly and very young tend to suffer more severe symptoms.
  • Vibrio infection -- Vibrio furnissii: An infectious disease caused by a bacteria called Vibrio furnissii. The nature and severity of symptoms can vary considerably depending on the type of infection caused - gastroenteritis, wound infection or septicemia. Gastroenteritis is the most common disease associated with this bacteria and septicemia and wound infection is relatively rare. Infection usually occurs through consumption of contaminated seafood or exposure of a wound to contaminated water. The elderly and very young tend to suffer more severe symptoms.
  • Vibrio infection -- Vibrio holisae: An infectious disease caused by a bacteria called Vibrio holisae. The nature and severity of symptoms can vary considerably depending on the type of infection caused - gastroenteritis, wound infection or septicemia. Gastroenteritis is the most common disease associated with this bacteria and septicemia is relatively rare. Infection usually occurs through consumption of contaminated seafood or exposure of a wound to contaminated water. The elderly and very young tend to suffer more severe symptoms.
  • Vibrio infection -- Vibrio metschnikovii: An infectious disease caused by a bacteria called Vibrio metschnikovii. The nature and severity of symptoms can vary considerably depending on the type of infection caused - gastroenteritis, wound infection or septicemia. Gastroenteritis is the most common disease associated with this bacteria and septicemia is relatively rare. Infection usually occurs through consumption of contaminated seafood or exposure of a wound to contaminated water. The elderly and very young tend to suffer more severe symptoms.
  • Vibrio infection -- Vibrio mimicus: An infectious disease caused by a bacteria called Vibrio mimicus. The nature and severity of symptoms can vary considerably depending on the type of infection caused - gastroenteritis, wound infection or septicemia. Gastroenteritis is the most common disease associated with this bacteria and septicemia and wound infection is relatively rare. Infection usually occurs through consumption of contaminated seafood or exposure of a wound to contaminated water. The elderly and very young tend to suffer more severe symptoms.
  • Vibrio infection -- Vibrio parahaemolyticus: An infectious disease caused by a bacteria called Vibrio parahaemolyticus. The nature and severity of symptoms can vary considerably depending on the type of infection caused - gastroenteritis, wound infection or septicemia. Gastroenteritis is the most common disease associated with this bacteria and septicemia is relatively rare. Infection usually occurs through consumption of contaminated seafood or exposure of a wound to contaminated water. The elderly and very young tend to suffer more severe symptoms.
  • Vibrio infections: Infection by a bacteria which occurs naturally in seawater and in the stomach of many seawater animals. It is a serious infection and accounts for most seafood-related deaths. It causes severe gastrointestinal symptoms and can also cause wound infection.
  • Vibrio vulnificus: Bacteria commonly infecting oysters and seafood.
  • Warts: Wart growths on the skin or genital area.
  • Weals: Drug reaction, allergy, infection, lupus, overactive thyroid, polycythemia, rheumatic fever, blisters, amyloidosis, progesterone increase, Still's Disease, pregnancy, vasculitis
  • Wegener's granulomatosis: A rare disease involving blood vessel inflammation which can affect the blood flow to various tissues and organs and hence cause damage. The respiratory system and the kidneys are the main systems affected.
  • Wells syndrome: A rare disorder affecting the skin and characterized by a flame-shaped patch of raised red skin which eventually undergoes changes such as blistering and altered color.
  • Werner syndrome: A form of premature aging where sufferers start aging during adolescence or soon after and appear old by the time they reach their 30's or 40's. Milder forms of the condition may also occur.
  • West African Trypanosomiasis: West African sleeping sickness from the tsetse fly
  • White marked tussock moth caterpillar poisoning: Contact with the poisonous hairs or spines of the White marked tussock moth caterpillar can cause skin rashes or even a hypersensitivity reaction in some cases.
  • Wound drains and tubes induced allergies: Wound drains and tubes induced allergies are an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to the latex in wound drains and tubes which are often used during surgery. Symptoms may vary depending on the location of the wound drains and tubes.
  • Xanthogranulomatous sialadenitis: A form of salivary gland inflammation and obstruction.
  • Yaws: A rare infections disease caused by the spiral-shaped bacteria Treponema pertenue. The disease consists of three phases: skin lesions are followed by bone, joint and widespread skin symptoms and finally by inflammation and destruction of cartilage in the nose, pharynx and palate. Transmission can be through direct contact with infected skin, insect bites or sex.

Conditions listing medical symptoms: Sores:

The following list of conditions have 'Sores' or similar listed as a symptom in our database. This computer-generated list may be inaccurate or incomplete. Always seek prompt professional medical advice about the cause of any symptom.

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Conditions listing medical complications: Sores:

The following list of medical conditions have 'Sores' or similar listed as a medical complication in our database.

 

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