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Symptoms » Weals » Glossary
 

Glossary for Weals

Medical terms related to Weals or mentioned in this section include:

  • Abalone poisoning: Abalone are a shellfish that are commonly eaten by humans. The internal organs of the abalone sometimes contain toxins which can cause various symptoms. The toxins are believed to originate from toxic components in the abalones diet.
  • Acquired angioedema: A rare disorder characterized by recurring episodes of swelling of parts of the skin or mucous membranes. Sometimes internal organs may be involved. The disorder occurs in patients with lymphoproliferative or autoimmune disorders which result in the dysfunction of a complex blood protein called C1 inhibitor.
  • Allergic contact dermatitis: An allergic contact dermatitis is where the body's immune system causes a skin reaction in response to direct contact with an allergen. Symptoms usually only affect the skin directly in contact with the allergen but in severe cases, symptoms may spread around the contact site or even become widespread across the body.
  • Allergic reaction: A hypersensitivity reaction produced by the body, which results in an exaggerated or inappropriate immune reaction to a particular substance.
  • Allergies: Immune system over-reaction to various substances.
  • Anaphylaxis: An immediate hypersensitivity reaction due to the exposure of a specific antigen to a sensitized individual
  • Angioedema: oedema of the skin, mucous and submucous tissues of the body
  • Asian Dendorlimus pini caterpillar poisoning: A chronic illness caused by contact with certain a poisonous caterpillar called Dendorlimus pini. Contact with the cocoon can also cause symptoms. These caterpillars can be found in Asia, north Africa and eastern Europe.
  • Aspirin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Aspirin during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Autoimmune Vasculitis: A inflammation of the blood vessels caused by an autoimmune reaction
  • Autoimmune progesterone dermatitis: A skin rash that appears to be a result of the body's immune reaction to progesterone. As progesterone production is linked to menstrual cycles, the rash occurs usually in the week before menstruation until a few days after menstruation starts.
  • Bahemuka Brown syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized by spastic paraplegia and skin pigmentation irregularities.
  • Blisters: Blistering of the skin.
  • Bristleworm poisoning: Bristleworms are a type of marine worm covered in bristles which they can use to sting. The bristles are strong enough to break human skin and cause symptoms.
  • Browntail moth caterpillar poisoning: A hairy, bright-colored caterpillar which can cause skin symptoms on contact with the hair. Inhalation of the hairs can cause respiratory symptoms and eye exposure can also result in symptoms. Patients with pre-existing asthma or atopic allergies may suffer more severe symptoms.
  • Callistin shellfish poisoning: The Callistin shellfish (Japanese Callista) is found primarily in Japan. Eating the whole shellfish can cause poisoning symptoms in humans. It is believed that the ovaries contain high levels of choline during spawning season which makes them toxic to humans. The symptoms that manifest are similar to a severe allergic reaction. Avoiding eating the ovaries is the best way to prevent poisoning - cooking does not destroy the toxin.
  • Candidiasis: Fungal infection of moist areas such as mouth or vagina
  • Captopril -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Captopril during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Caterpillar complication poisoning: The spines on certain caterpillars can cause a skin reaction as well as systemic symptoms if ingested. The nature of the symptoms vary depending on the species of caterpillar involved. Some only produce skin reactions whereas others can produce systemic symptoms.
  • Ceftriaxone -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Ceftriaxone (an antibiotic) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Ammonia: Ammonia is a chemical used mainly in household cleaning products and bleach. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Formaldehyde: Formaldehyde is a chemical used mainly in blues, lacquers, fireproofing, electrical insulation, leather tanning products and embalming. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Palladium: Palladium is a chemical which is very widely used in manufactured goods: jewelry, electronics, dentistry, medicine, groundwater treatment and fuel cells . Palladium carries a high risk of sensitization. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Platinum: Platinum is a metal used mainly in jewelry, electrical contacts, dentistry, laboratory equipment and vehicle emission control devices. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Rhodium: Rhodium is metallic element used mainly in platinum and palladium alloys and vehicle catalytic converters. It is also used in jewelry, high quality pens, and as a catalyst in various industrial processes. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Tetramethylammonium Hydroxide: Tetramethylammonium Hydroxide is a chemical used mainly in the production of a variety of electronic components. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chirodropidae poisoning: Chirodropidae are jellyfish-like marine organisms found mainly in the Indian and Pacific Oceans. They can deliver a painful sting which can be life-threatening in some cases. The box jellyfish, Irukundji jellyfish and some sea wasps are all members of this class.
  • Cholinergic urticaria: Cholinergic urticaria are hives caused by heat or exertion.
  • Churg-Strauss Syndrome: A rare allergy related disease involving clumping of excess eosinophils which cause inflammation of smaller arteries and veins (granulomatosis). This has a negative effect on the circulatory system and the lungs resulting in asthma and organ damage.
  • Ciprofloxacin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Ciprofloxacin (a fluoroquinolone antibiotic) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Cocky Apple stinging caterpillar poisoning: Contact with the poisonous hairs or spines of the Cocky Apple stinging caterpillar can cause skin rashes or even a hypersensitivity reaction in some cases.
  • Cold-like symptoms: Symptoms similar to the common cold.
  • Common Woolly Bear moth caterpillar poisoning: Contact with the poisonous hairs or spines of the Common Woolly Bear moth caterpillar can cause skin rashes or even a hypersensitivity reaction in some cases.
  • Dendrolimiasis: A chronic illness caused by contact with certain poisonous caterpillar spines or urticating hairs.
  • Dermatitis herpetiformis: A condition which is characterized by a chronic pruritic dermatitis
  • Dialyzer hypersensitivity syndrome: An anaphylactic reaction that occurs in some patients who are dialyzed on artificial kidneys. A compound (ethylene oxide) used to dry sterilize artificial kidneys is a likely allergen.
  • Diphenhydramine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Diphenhydramine during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Dipylidium: The dog tapeworm
  • Dipylidium caninum infection: A tapeworm (Dipylidium caninum) infection. Transmission can occur when infected animal fleas are accidentally ingested.
  • Doxepin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Doxepin during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Drug Allergies: Allergies to medications or other drugs.
  • Eczema: Skin rash usually from allergic causes.
  • Enalapril -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Enalapril (an ACE inhibitor) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Erythrokeratodermia ataxia: A rare inherited condition characterized by skin and nervous system disorders
  • Familial Cold Autoinflammatory Syndrome (FCAS): An inherited inflammatory disorder which causes periods of fever, rash and pain in joints after being exposed to cold conditions. Symptoms last less than a day and start within hours of exposure to the cold.
  • Fluke infections: An infection caused by flukes
  • Food Additive Adverse reaction -- chocolate: An intolerance to chocolate is an adverse reaction (not an immune response) by the body to chocolate. The adverse reaction results from the body's inability to metabolize the food. The amount of chocolate required to trigger the onset of symptoms and the nature and severity of symptoms may vary considerably between patients.
  • Food Additive Adverse reaction -- sulphite: An intolerance to sulphite is an adverse reaction (not an immune response) by the body to sulphite. The adverse reaction results from the body's inability to metabolize the substance. The amount of sulphite required to trigger the onset of symptoms and the nature and severity of symptoms may vary considerably between patients.
  • Food allergies: a food allergy is an adverse immune response to a food protein
  • Food allergy: adverse immune response to a food protein
  • Fresh Mangrove caterpillar poisoning: Contact with the poisonous hairs or spines of the Fresh Mangrove caterpillar can cause skin rashes or even a hypersensitivity reaction in some cases.
  • Giant silkworm poisoning: A pale, yellow-green caterpillar with red legs which has poisonous green spines on parts of its back. It is commonly found in North America.
  • Grapeleaf skeletonizer caterpillar poisoning: Contact with the poisonous hairs or spines of the grapeleaf skeletonizer caterpillar can cause skin rashes or even a hypersensitivity reaction in some cases.
  • Graves Disease: A condition which is an autoimmune disease that affects the thyroid resulting hyperthyroidism
  • Gypsy moth caterpillar poisoning: Contact with the poisonous hairs or spines of the Gypsy moth caterpillar can cause skin rashes or even a hypersensitivity reaction in some cases.
  • Head symptoms: Symptoms affecting the head or brain
  • Helminth infections: The infection by a parasitic worm
  • Hepatitis B: Viral liver infection spread by sex or body fluids.
  • Herbal Agent adverse reaction -- Clove: Clove can be used as a herbal agent that can be used topically for tooth pain or as a local anesthetic in dentistry. The herbal agent can cause an adverse reaction or even anaphylaxis in some people.
  • Herbal Agent adverse reaction -- Ginkgo biloba: Ginkgo biloba can be used as a herbal agent to treat conditions such as tinnitus, brain trauma, vertigo, blood vessel diseases and any other problems which benefit from the blood vessel dilating action of the herbal agent. Ginkgo biloba can cause adverse reactions in some people.
  • Herbal Agent adverse reaction -- Nettles: The root extracts from nettle plants can be used as a herbal agent to treat rheumatic disorders and urinary problems related to enlarged prostate. The root extract can cause an adverse reaction in some people.
  • Herbal Agent adverse reaction -- Passion Flower: Passion Flower can be used as a herbal agent to treat insomnia, nerve painand anxiety. The herbal agent contains various chemicals which can cause an adverse reaction in some people.
  • Herbal Agent overdose -- Chaste Tree: Chaste tree can be used as a herbal agent to treat menstrual problems and breast pain. The herbal agent can cause an adverse reaction in some patients. It is important to note that this herb may inhibit the effect of the birth control pill.
  • Hereditary angioedema: An inherited disorder where a blockage in a lymphatic vessel or blood vein causes temporary swelling of affected parts of the body which sometimes includes organs.
  • Hickory tussock moth caterpillar poisoning: Contact with the poisonous hairs or spines of the Hickory tussock moth caterpillar can cause skin rashes or even a hypersensitivity reaction in some cases.
  • Hives: Specific type of skin rash
  • Hydatid disease: Rare multi-organ tapeworm infection caught from animals.
  • Hydroid poisoning: Hydroids are a type of jellyfish commonly found in the warmer oceans of the world.
  • Hydroxyzine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Hydroxyzine (an antihistamine) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Infantile multisystem inflammatory disease: A rare autoinflammatory disease characterized by fever, rash, arthritic changes, eye problems and chronic meningitis.
  • Latex allergies: When a person has an allergic reaction to latex
  • Lupus: chronic autoimmune disease that can be fatal, though with recent medical advances, fatalities are becoming increasingly rare.
  • Lyme disease: Lyme disease is an emerging infectious disease caused by at least three species of bacteria belonging to the genus Borrelia.
  • Lymphatic Filariasis: Parasitic worm infection of the lympatic system
  • Lymphoma: Any neoplastic disorder that occurs in lymphoid tissue
  • Mastocytosis: A disorder where excessive amounts of mast cells proliferate in organs such as the skin, liver, bone, spleen and gastrointestinal tract. Mast cells occur in connective tissue and defend the body against disease by releasing histamine to stimulate the immune system.
  • Mebendazole -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Mebendazole during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Mental retardation -- arachnodactyly -- hypotonia -- telangiectasia: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by mental retardation, short fingers, reduced muscle tone and spider veins (telangiectasia).
  • Mesquite Buck moth caterpillar poisoning: Contact with the poisonous hairs or spines of the Mesquite Buck moth caterpillar can cause skin rashes or even a hypersensitivity reaction in some cases.
  • Mesquite stinger caterpillar poisoning: Contact with the poisonous hairs or spines of the Mesquite stinger caterpillar can cause skin rashes or even a hypersensitivity reaction in some cases.
  • Mononucleosis: Common infectious virus.
  • Moon Jellyfish poisoning: Contact with the Moon Jellyfish can result in various mild to moderate skin symptoms.
  • Muckle-Wells syndrome: An inherited condition characterized by amyloidosis (protein deposits), deafness, hives and limb pain.
  • NOMID syndrome: A rare autoinflammatory disease characterized by fever, rash, arthritic changes, eye problems and chronic meningitis.
  • Nakajo syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by skin problems, various head anomalies and loss of fat in parts of the body.
  • Nakajo-Nishimura syndrome: A rare disorder involving muscle degeneration, loss of skin fat and impaired immune functioning.
  • Nalidixic Acid -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Nalidixic Acid during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Nerve symptoms: Symptoms affecting the nerves
  • Nicolaides-Baraitser syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by short stature, reduced hair, short fingers, epilepsy and abnormal bone development.
  • Norfloxacin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Norfloxacin during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Oleander caterpillar poisoning: Contact with the poisonous hairs or spines of the Oleander caterpillar can cause skin rashes or even a hypersensitivity reaction in some cases.
  • Olindias sp poisoning: The Olindias is a type of hyrdozoan jellyfish found mainly in South American waters. It can deliver a relatively harmless but painful sting to humans.
  • Pale tussock moth caterpillar poisoning: Contact with the poisonous hairs or spines of the Pale tussock moth caterpillar can cause skin rashes or even a hypersensitivity reaction in some cases.
  • Paming moth caterpillar poisoning: Contact with the poisonous hairs or spines of the Paming moth caterpillar can cause skin rashes or even a hypersensitivity reaction in some cases.
  • Paragonimiases -- lung infection: Infection by a parasitic worm, Paragonimus westermani, which are a type of lung fluke which invade the lungs and other organs where they cause problems. Infection occurs through eating freshwater crabs and crayfish which have not been cooked sufficiently.
  • Paragonimiasis: Infection by a parasitic worm, Paragonimus westermani, which are a type of lung fluke which invade the lungs, and sometimes other organs, where they cause problems. Occasionally the parasites infect the brain which can occasionally result in death. Infection occurs through eating freshwater crabs and crayfish which have not been cooked sufficiently.
  • Peanut allergies: A hypersensitive state that is due to exposure to an allergen contained in peanuts
  • Pellagra-like syndrome: A rare disorder where the body is unable to metabolise tryptophan which causes a distinctive skin rash and neurological symptoms.
  • Penicillin allergy: Taking penicillin (a type of antibiotic) can cause an allergic response in some people. It involves the body's immune system overreacting to the drug. The type and severity of symptoms can vary considerable though skin symptoms are the most common allergic response to drugs. Penicillin allergy is one of the more common types of drug allergies.
  • Pollen allergy: An allergic reaction that occurs due to exposure to pollen
  • Possible human carcinogenic exposure -- Propylthiouracil: Some evidence indicates that exposure to Propylthiouracil has a possible link to an increased risk of developing cancer in humans. The carcinogenicity of the substance may be influenced by the duration and level of exposure. Propylthiouracil is a pharmaceutical drug used to treat hyperthyroidism.
  • Processionary tree caterpillar poisoning: A dark, grey-black caterpillar which can cause varying symptoms on contact with its hairs or spines.
  • Randa's Eyed Silk moth caterpillar poisoning: Contact with the poisonous hairs or spines of the Randa's Eyed Silk moth caterpillar can cause skin rashes or even a hypersensitivity reaction in some cases.
  • Rash: Rash of any type affecting the skin.
  • Red Whelk poisoning: Red Whelk are colorful, carnivorous snail found mainly in Britain and Japan. The salivary gland of some whelks contains tetramine which can cause symptoms in humans if eaten. Raw, cooked or canned whelk can cause poisoning. Red whelk have the highest concentration of toxins in the summer. Whelk is often used as fish bait.
  • Roundworm: A worm of the class nematode
  • Satin moth caterpillar poisoning: Contact with the poisonous hairs or spines of the Satin moth caterpillar can cause skin rashes or even a hypersensitivity reaction in some cases.
  • Scabies: Mite infection of the skin common in institutions.
  • Schnitzler syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by the association of chronic urticaria as well as a blood abnormality called macroglobulinemia.
  • Sensations: Changes to sensations or the senses
  • Serum sickness: Type of allergic reaction to certain medications or serums
  • Short limbs subluxed knees cleft palate: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by short limbs, partially dislocated knees and a cleft palate.
  • Silver Spotted Tiger moth caterpillar poisoning: Contact with the poisonous hairs or spines of the Silver Spotted Tiger moth caterpillar can cause skin rashes or even a hypersensitivity reaction in some cases.
  • Skin allergies: A reaction to the exposure of the skin to an allergen
  • Skin conditions: Any condition that affects the skin
  • Skin lesion: Lesions appearing on the skin.
  • Skin problems: Any condition that affects the skin
  • Skin rash: Change in the skin which affects the color, appearance or texture.
  • Skin symptoms: Symptoms affecting the skin.
  • Skin ulcer: The occurrence of an ulcer that is located on the skin
  • Solar urticaria: A form of hives that occurs in response to sun exposure. Symptoms usually occur within minutes of the sun exposure. Symptoms usually persist for between half an hour to two hours.
  • Sores: Sores affecting the skin.
  • Sparse hair -- short stature -- skin anomalies: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by sparse hair, short stature and skin anomalies.
  • Spiny elm caterpillar poisoning: Contact with the poisonous hairs or spines of the Spiny Elm caterpillar can cause skin rashes or even a hypersensitivity reaction in some cases.
  • Spirometra erinace-ieuropaei infection: Infection with a tapeworm species called Spirometra erinace-ieuropaei. Infection usually results from ingesting contaminated food or water. The parasite can migrate to any part of the body but usually resides under the skin where it develops into a nodule.
  • Spirometra mansoni infection: Infection with a tapeworm species called Spirometra mansoni. Infection usually results from ingesting contaminated food or water. The parasite can migrate to any part of the body but usually resides under the skin where it develops into a nodule.
  • Spirometra mansonoides infection: Infection with a tapeworm species called Spirometra mansonoides. Infection usually results from ingesting contaminated food or water. The parasite can migrate to any part of the body but usually resides under the skin where it develops into a nodule.
  • Spirometra theileri infection: Infection with a tapeworm species called Spirometra theileri. Infection usually results from ingesting contaminated food or water. The parasite can migrate to any part of the body but usually resides under the skin where it develops into a nodule.
  • Stinging Bark caterpillar poisoning: Contact with the poisonous hairs or spines of the Stinging Bark caterpillar can cause skin rashes or even a hypersensitivity reaction in some cases.
  • Stinging Nettle caterpillar poisoning: Contact with the poisonous hairs or spines of the Stinging Nettle caterpillar can cause skin rashes or even a hypersensitivity reaction in some cases.
  • Stinging Rose caterpillar poisoning: Contact with the poisonous hairs or spines of the Stinging Rose caterpillar can cause skin rashes or even a hypersensitivity reaction in some cases.
  • Strongyloidiasis: A parasitic infectious disease involving the intestines and caused by the nematode Strongyloides stercoralis. Infection usually occurs in crowded, unsanitized populations.
  • Systemic Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis: Onset of JRA with fevers and systemic symptoms
  • Systemic lupus erythematosus: chronic autoimmune disease that can be fatal, though with recent medical advances, fatalities are becoming increasingly rare.
  • Taeniasis: An infection with a type of tapeworm
  • Thyrotoxicosis: hypermetabolic clinical syndrome resulting from serum elevations in thyroid hormone levels, specifically free thyroxine (T4), triiodothyronine (T3), or both.
  • Trichinosis: Worm infection usually caught from pigs
  • Tussock moth caterpillar poisoning: A hairy, bright-colored caterpillar which can cause skin symptoms on contact with the hair. Inhalation of the hairs can cause respiratory symptoms and eye exposure can also result in symptoms. Patients with pre-existing asthma or atopic allergies may suffer more severe symptoms.
  • Urticaria: Drug reaction, allergy, infection, lupus, overactive thyroid, polycythemia, rheumatic fever, blisters, amyloidosis, progesterone increase, Still's Disease, pregnancy, vasculitis
  • Vasculitis: A condition which is characterized by inflammation to blood vessels
  • Vasculitis hypersensitivity: A condition which is characterised by a reaction that results in the inflammation of the blood vessels
  • Viral Hepatitis: hepatitis describes inflammation of the liver. Hepatitis may be caused by alcohol, drugs, autoimmune diseases, metabolic diseases, and viruses. Viral infection accounts for more than half the cases of acute hepatitis.
  • Weals: Drug reaction, allergy, infection, lupus, overactive thyroid, polycythemia, rheumatic fever, blisters, amyloidosis, progesterone increase, Still's Disease, pregnancy, vasculitis
  • Weals in pregnancy: Well circumscribed, reddened oedematous patches of the skin, often with a paler centre, a woman who is pregnant.
  • Wells syndrome: A rare disorder affecting the skin and characterized by a flame-shaped patch of raised red skin which eventually undergoes changes such as blistering and altered color.
  • White marked tussock moth caterpillar poisoning: Contact with the poisonous hairs or spines of the White marked tussock moth caterpillar can cause skin rashes or even a hypersensitivity reaction in some cases.

Conditions listing medical symptoms: Weals:

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Conditions listing medical complications: Weals:

The following list of medical conditions have 'Weals' or similar listed as a medical complication in our database.

 

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