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Treatments for Urinary tract infections

Treatments for Urinary tract infections:

The first step in treating urinary tract infections is prevention. Prevention measures include drinking plenty of fluids, urinating as soon as possible when the urge is felt, and drinking cranberry juice, which may have infection-fighting qualities.

For women, prevention measures include urinating promptly after having sexual intercourse, wiping the genital area from front to back after urinating or defecating, and not using douches or deodorant feminine products. These can be irritating to the genitals.

Early recognition and treatment of bladder infections often result in a cure without complications in generally healthy people. Treatment includes an antibiotic medication, such as amoxicillin or ciprofloxacin, nitrofurantoin, or sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim. Bacterial prostatitis and pyelonephritis are also treated with antibiotics if the infecting microorganism is bacterial.

For urinary tract infections that have resulted in complications, such as kidney damage or sepsis, hospital care is generally necessary. This may include intravenous antibiotics and intensive care and life support in some cases. People most likely to be hospitalized include the elderly, people who live in long-term care, and those with chronic conditions that affect the immune system, such as HIV/AIDS or diabetes.

Treatment List for Urinary tract infections

The list of treatments mentioned in various sources for Urinary tract infections includes the following list. Always seek professional medical advice about any treatment or change in treatment plans.

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Drugs and Medications used to treat Urinary tract infections:

Note:You must always seek professional medical advice about any prescription drug, OTC drug, medication, treatment or change in treatment plans.

Some of the different medications used in the treatment of Urinary tract infections include:

  • Cephalosporin Antibiotic Drugs
  • Cefaclor
  • Ceclor
  • Cefadroxil
  • Duricef
  • Ultracef
  • Cefixime
  • Suprax
  • Cefprozil
  • Cefzil
  • Ceftriaxone
  • Rocephin
  • Cefuroxime
  • Ceftin
  • Kefurox
  • Zinaxef
  • Cephalexin
  • Apo-Cephalex
  • Cefanex
  • Ceporex
  • Keflet
  • Keflex
  • Keftab
  • Novo-Lexin
  • Nu-Cephalex
  • Loracarbef
  • Lorabid
  • Flucytosine - mainly used to treat urinary tract infections caused by Candida or Cryptococcus
  • 5-fluorocytosine - mainly used to treat urinary tract infections caused by Candida or Cryptococcus
  • 5-FC - mainly used to treat urinary tract infections caused by Candida or Cryptococcus
  • Ancobon - mainly used to treat urinary tract infections caused by Candida or Cryptococcus
  • Ancotil - mainly used to treat urinary tract infections caused by Candida or Cryptococcus
  • Novo-triphyl - mainly used to treat urinary tract infections caused by Candida or Cryptococcus
  • Fluoroquinolone antibiotic
  • Trovafloxacin
  • Floxin Uropak
  • Trimethoprim
  • Alti-Trimethoprim
  • Apo-Sulfatrim
  • Apo-Sulftarim DS
  • Bactrim
  • Bactrim DS
  • Bethaprim
  • Comoxol
  • Coptin
  • Cotrim
  • Novo-Trimel
  • Novo-Trimel DS
  • Nu-Cotrimox
  • Proloprim
  • Protrin
  • Protrin DF
  • Roubac
  • Septra
  • Septra DS
  • SMZ-TMP
  • Sulfatrim D//s
  • Trimpex
  • Uroplus DS
  • Uroplus SS
  • Acetohydroxamic Acid
  • Lithostat
  • DisperMox
  • Utimox
  • Amoxifur
  • Pro-Amox
  • Moxilin
  • Gen-Amoxicillin
  • Lin-Amox
  • PMS-Amoxicillin
  • Nandrolone
  • Acroxil
  • Amobay
  • Amoxil
  • Amoxinovag
  • Amoxisol
  • Amoxivet
  • Ampliron
  • Ardine
  • Flemoxon
  • Gimalxina
  • Grunicina
  • Hidramox
  • Moxlin
  • Penamox
  • Polymox
  • Servamox
  • Solciclina
  • Xalyn-Or
  • Amoxicillin and Clavulanate Potassium
  • Augmentin ES-600
  • Augmentin XR
  • Alti-Amoxi-Clav
  • Apo-Amoxi-Clav
  • Eumetinex
  • Aztreonam
  • Azactam
  • Carbenicillin
  • Geocillin
  • Carbecin Inyectable
  • Ceclor CD
  • Raniclor
  • Apo-Cefaclor
  • Novo-Cefaclor
  • Nu-Cefaclor
  • PMS-Cefaclor
  • Cefazolin
  • Ancef
  • Cefzol
  • Cefamezin
  • Cefepime
  • Maxipime
  • Denvar
  • Cefotaxime
  • Claforan
  • Benaxima
  • Blosint
  • Cefadril
  • Clatoran
  • Fotexina
  • Taporin
  • Viken
  • Cefotetan
  • Cefotan
  • Cefoxitin
  • Mefoxin
  • Ceftizoxime
  • Cefizox
  • Amcel
  • Benaxona
  • Cefaxona
  • Ceftrex
  • Tacex
  • Terbac
  • Triaken
  • Cipro XR
  • Ciprol XL
  • Cimogal
  • Ciprobiotic
  • Ciproflox
  • Ciprofur
  • Ciproxina
  • Eni
  • Kenzoflex
  • Microrgan
  • Mitroken
  • Nivoflox
  • Novoquin
  • Opthaflox
  • Quinoflox
  • Sophixin
  • Suiflox
  • Zipra
  • Demeclocycline
  • Declomycin
  • Ledemicina
  • Fosfomycin
  • Monurol
  • Fostocil
  • Genoptic
  • Gentak
  • Alcomicin
  • Diogent
  • Garamycin
  • Minim's Gentamicin 0.3%
  • SAB-Gentamicin
  • Garamicina
  • Genemicin
  • Genkova
  • Genrex
  • Gentabac
  • Gentacin
  • Genta Grin
  • Gentarim
  • Gentazaf
  • F.I
  • Ikatin
  • Servigenta
  • Tondex
  • Yectamicina
  • Imipenem and Cilastatin
  • Primaxin
  • Tienam
  • Meropenem
  • Merrem
  • Merrem I.V
  • Methenamine
  • Hiprex
  • Mandelamine
  • Urex
  • Dehydral
  • Utrasal
  • Nalidixic Acid
  • NegGram
  • Nitrofurantoin
  • Macrodantina
  • Apo-Nitrofurantoin
  • Macrobid
  • Macrodantin
  • Novo-Furantoin
  • Furadantin
  • Penicillin V Potassium
  • Veetids
  • Apo-Pen VK
  • Nadopen-V
  • Novo-Pen-VK
  • Nu-Pen-VK
  • PVF K
  • Phenazopyridine
  • Azo-Gesic
  • Azo-Standard
  • Prodium
  • Pyridium
  • ReAzo
  • Uristat
  • UTI Relief
  • Phenazo
  • Azo Wintomylon
  • Madel
  • Urovalidin
  • Piperacillin and Tazobactam Sodium
  • Zosyn
  • Tazocin
  • Piperacillin
  • Pipracil
  • Pivampicillin
  • Pondocillin
  • Sulfadiazine
  • Ticarcillin
  • Ticar
  • Ticarcillin and Clavulanate Potassium
  • Timentin
  • Primsol
  • Apo-Trimethoprim
  • Bactilen
  • Bactiver
  • Bactropin
  • Bateral
  • Dibaprim
  • Maxtrim
  • Septrin
  • Servitrim
  • Trimexazol
  • Trimexole-F
  • Ralodantin
  • Echinacea

Hospital statistics for Urinary tract infections:

These medical statistics relate to hospitals, hospitalization and Urinary tract infections:

  • 0.11% (13,865) of hospital consultant episodes were for infections of genitourinary tract in pregnancy in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 98% of hospital consultant episodes for infections of genitourinary tract in pregnancy required hospital admission in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 100% of hospital consultant episodes for infections of genitourinary tract in pregnancy were for women in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 10% of hospital consultant episodes for infections of genitourinary tract in pregnancy required emergency hospital admission in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 1.2 days was the mean length of stay in hospitals for infections of genitourinary tract in pregnancy in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • more hospital information...»

Hospitals & Medical Clinics: Urinary tract infections

Research quality ratings and patient incidents/safety measures for hospitals and medical facilities in specialties related to Urinary tract infections:

Hospital & Clinic quality ratings »

Choosing the Best Treatment Hospital: More general information, not necessarily in relation to Urinary tract infections, on hospital and medical facility performance and surgical care quality:

Discussion of treatments for Urinary tract infections:

Urinary Tract Infections in Adults: NIDDK (Excerpt)

UTIs are treated with antibacterial drugs. The choice of drug and length of treatment depend on the patient's history and the urine tests that identify the offending bacteria. The sensitivity test is especially useful in helping the doctor select the most effective drug. The drugs most often used to treat routine, uncomplicated UTIs are trimethoprim (Trimpex), trimethoprim/ sulfamethoxazole (Bactrim, Septra, Cotrim), amoxicillin (Amoxil, Trimox, Wymox), nitrofurantoin (Macrodantin, Furadantin), and ampicillin. A class of drugs called quinolones includes four drugs approved in recent years for treating UTI. These drugs include ofloxacin (Floxin), norfloxacin (Noroxin), ciprofloxacin (Cipro), and trovafloxin (Trovan).

Often, a UTI can be cured with 1 or 2 days of treatment if the infection is not complicated by an obstruction or nervous system disorder. Still, many doctors ask their patients to take antibiotics for a week or two to ensure that the infection has been cured. Single-dose treatment is not recommended for some groups of patients, for example, those who have delayed treatment or have signs of a kidney infection, patients with diabetes or structural abnormalities, or men who have prostate infections. Longer treatment is also needed by patients with infections caused by Mycoplasma or Chlamydia, which are usually treated with tetracycline, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (TMP/SMZ), or doxycycline. A followup urinalysis helps to confirm that the urinary tract is infection-free. It is important to take the full course of treatment because symptoms may disappear before the infection is fully cleared.

Severely ill patients with kidney infections may be hospitalized until they can take fluids and needed drugs on their own. Kidney infections generally require several weeks of antibiotic treatment. Researchers at the University of Washington found that 2-week therapy with TMP/SMZ was as effective as 6 weeks of treatment with the same drug in women with kidney infections that did not involve an obstruction or nervous system disorder. In such cases, kidney infections rarely lead to kidney damage or kidney failure unless they go untreated.

Various drugs are available to relieve the pain of a UTI. A heating pad may also help. Most doctors suggest that drinking plenty of water helps cleanse the urinary tract of bacteria. For the time being, it is best to avoid coffee, alcohol, and spicy foods. (And one of the best things a smoker can do for his or her bladder is to quit smoking. Smoking is the major known cause of bladder cancer.) (Source: excerpt from Urinary Tract Infections in Adults: NIDDK)

Urinary Tract Infections in Adults: NIDDK (Excerpt)

A woman who has frequent recurrences (three or more a year) should ask her doctor about one of the following treatment options:

  • Take low doses of an antibiotic such as TMP/SMZ or nitrofurantoin daily for 6 months or longer. (If taken at bedtime, the drug remains in the bladder longer and may be more effective.) NIH-supported research at the University of Washington has shown this therapy to be effective without causing serious side effects.

  • Take a single dose of an antibiotic after sexual intercourse.

  • Take a short course (1 or 2 days) of antibiotics when symptoms appear.
(Source: excerpt from Urinary Tract Infections in Adults: NIDDK)

Urinary Tract Infections in Adults: NIDDK (Excerpt)

Usually, doctors recommend lengthier therapy in men than in women, in part to prevent infections of the prostate gland.

Prostate infections (chronic bacterial prostatitis) are harder to cure because antibiotics are unable to penetrate infected prostate tissue effectively. For this reason, men with prostatitis often need long-term treatment with a carefully selected antibiotic. UTIs in older men are frequently associated with acute bacterial prostatitis, which can be fatal if not treated immediately. (Source: excerpt from Urinary Tract Infections in Adults: NIDDK)

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