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What is Wallenberg's Syndrome?

What is Wallenberg's Syndrome?

  • Wallenberg's Syndrome: A rare neurological condition caused by a stroke (involving the cerebellar artery) and resulting in symptoms such as facial paralysis or weakness on one side of body.
  • Wallenberg's Syndrome: Infarction of the dorsolateral aspect of the medulla due to occlusion of the vertebral artery and/or the posterior inferior cerebellar artery. Clinical manifestations vary with the size of infarction, but may include loss of pain and temperature sensation in the ipsilateral face and contralateral body below the chin; ipsilateral HORNER SYNDROME; ipsilateral ATAXIA; DYSARTHRIA; VERTIGO; nausea, hiccup; dysphagia; and VOCAL CORD PARALYSIS. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p801)
    Source - Diseases Database

Wallenberg's Syndrome is listed as a "rare disease" by the Office of Rare Diseases (ORD) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). This means that Wallenberg's Syndrome, or a subtype of Wallenberg's Syndrome, affects less than 200,000 people in the US population.
Source - National Institutes of Health (NIH)

Wallenberg's Syndrome: Introduction

Types of Wallenberg's Syndrome:

Broader types of Wallenberg's Syndrome:

How serious is Wallenberg's Syndrome?

Prognosis of Wallenberg's Syndrome: spontaneous recovery with complete recovery in months except for neuralgia which can persist longer
Complications of Wallenberg's Syndrome: see complications of Wallenberg's Syndrome
Prognosis of Wallenberg's Syndrome: Individuals with Wallenberg's syndrome may experience a lessening of their symptoms as a result of medical intervention. For some patients, symptoms dissipate after a few weeks of treatment. (Source: excerpt from NINDS Wallenberg's Syndrome Information Page: NINDS)

What causes Wallenberg's Syndrome?

Causes of Wallenberg's Syndrome: see causes of Wallenberg's Syndrome
Cause of Wallenberg's Syndrome: Artery blockage in a vertebra or in the brain.

What are the symptoms of Wallenberg's Syndrome?

Symptoms of Wallenberg's Syndrome: see symptoms of Wallenberg's Syndrome

Complications of Wallenberg's Syndrome: see complications of Wallenberg's Syndrome

Onset of Wallenberg's Syndrome: usually over 40 years of age

Wallenberg's Syndrome: Testing

Diagnostic testing: see tests for Wallenberg's Syndrome.

Misdiagnosis: see misdiagnosis and Wallenberg's Syndrome.

How is it treated?

Doctors and Medical Specialists for Wallenberg's Syndrome: Neurologist ; see also doctors and medical specialists for Wallenberg's Syndrome.
Treatments for Wallenberg's Syndrome: see treatments for Wallenberg's Syndrome
Research for Wallenberg's Syndrome: see research for Wallenberg's Syndrome

Organs Affected by Wallenberg's Syndrome:

Organs and body systems related to Wallenberg's Syndrome include:

Name and Aliases of Wallenberg's Syndrome

Main name of condition: Wallenberg's Syndrome

Other names or spellings for Wallenberg's Syndrome:

Lateral Medullary Syndrome, Posterior inferior cerebellar artery syndrome, PICA syndrome, Vertebral artery syndrome, Vieseaux-Wallenberg syndrome, cerebellar artery syndrome, posterior inferior, cerebellar peduncle, dorsolateral medullary

Posterior inferior cerebellar artery syndrome, Lateral medullary syndrome Source - Diseases Database

Lateral Medullary syndrome, PICA syndrome, Posterior inferior cerebellar artery syndrome, Vertebral artery syndrome, PICA syndrome, Posterior inferior cerebellar artery syndrome, Vertebral artery syndrome
Source - Office of Rare Diseases (ORD) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH)

Wallenberg's Syndrome: Related Conditions

Research the causes of these diseases that are similar to, or related to, Wallenberg's Syndrome:

 

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